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Thirty Talks Weird Love

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Out of nowhere, a lady comes up to Anamaría and says she’s her, from the future. But Anamaría’s thirteen, she knows better than to talk to some weirdo stranger. Girls need to be careful, especially in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico—it’s the 90’s and fear is overtaking her beloved city as cases of kidnapped girls and women become alarmingly common. This thirty-year-old “future” lady Out of nowhere, a lady comes up to Anamaría and says she’s her, from the future. But Anamaría’s thirteen, she knows better than to talk to some weirdo stranger. Girls need to be careful, especially in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico—it’s the 90’s and fear is overtaking her beloved city as cases of kidnapped girls and women become alarmingly common. This thirty-year-old “future” lady doesn’t seem to be dangerous but she won’t stop bothering her, switching between cheesy Hallmark advice about being kind to yourself, and some mysterious talk about saving a girl. Anamaría definitely doesn’t need any saving, she’s doing just fine. She works hard at her strict, grade-obsessed middle school—so hard that she hardly gets any sleep; so hard that the stress makes her snap not just at mean girls but even her own (few) friends; so hard that when she does sleep she dreams about dying—but she just wants to do the best she can so she can grow up to be successful. Maybe Thirty’s right, maybe she’s not supposed to be so exhausted with her life, but how can she ask for help when her city is mourning the much bigger tragedy of its stolen girls? This thought-provoking, moving verse novel will lead adult and young adult readers alike to vital discussions on important topics—like dealing with depression and how to recognize this in yourself and others—through the accessible voice of a thirteen-year-old girl.


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Out of nowhere, a lady comes up to Anamaría and says she’s her, from the future. But Anamaría’s thirteen, she knows better than to talk to some weirdo stranger. Girls need to be careful, especially in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico—it’s the 90’s and fear is overtaking her beloved city as cases of kidnapped girls and women become alarmingly common. This thirty-year-old “future” lady Out of nowhere, a lady comes up to Anamaría and says she’s her, from the future. But Anamaría’s thirteen, she knows better than to talk to some weirdo stranger. Girls need to be careful, especially in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico—it’s the 90’s and fear is overtaking her beloved city as cases of kidnapped girls and women become alarmingly common. This thirty-year-old “future” lady doesn’t seem to be dangerous but she won’t stop bothering her, switching between cheesy Hallmark advice about being kind to yourself, and some mysterious talk about saving a girl. Anamaría definitely doesn’t need any saving, she’s doing just fine. She works hard at her strict, grade-obsessed middle school—so hard that she hardly gets any sleep; so hard that the stress makes her snap not just at mean girls but even her own (few) friends; so hard that when she does sleep she dreams about dying—but she just wants to do the best she can so she can grow up to be successful. Maybe Thirty’s right, maybe she’s not supposed to be so exhausted with her life, but how can she ask for help when her city is mourning the much bigger tragedy of its stolen girls? This thought-provoking, moving verse novel will lead adult and young adult readers alike to vital discussions on important topics—like dealing with depression and how to recognize this in yourself and others—through the accessible voice of a thirteen-year-old girl.

30 review for Thirty Talks Weird Love

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Set in Ciudad Juarez in 1999, Anamaria, who is 13, runs into her 30-year-old self while at the movies changing her pad in the bathroom. She's annoyed and suspicious: how could this be her? More, in a community where girls regularly go missing, she's worried that this 30-year-old version of her may not be who she claims to be. Written in a combination of Spanish and English, this verse novel is a compelling and hard-edged story about female friendship, about the challenges of being "the best," exp Set in Ciudad Juarez in 1999, Anamaria, who is 13, runs into her 30-year-old self while at the movies changing her pad in the bathroom. She's annoyed and suspicious: how could this be her? More, in a community where girls regularly go missing, she's worried that this 30-year-old version of her may not be who she claims to be. Written in a combination of Spanish and English, this verse novel is a compelling and hard-edged story about female friendship, about the challenges of being "the best," experiencing and understanding depression, and about living in a reality where safety is of constant concern. Anamaria loves science but finds herself falling for poetry throughout the book, which surprises her. She was put off by her 30-year-old self being a poet and saw it as a waste of time and talent. But it's through her poetry that young Anamaria can unravel the challenges she's set upon herself to be the top student, as well as to be unlike some of the other girls in her class who she finds so distasteful. And then when her best friend goes missing -- something her father worried about constantly, as Margarita lived in a rougher part of town -- things only get more and more challenging for her, and poetry is a tremendous reprieve. . . as is her 30-year-old self's wisdom. The setup is pretty fascinating, and because Anamaria is not really interested in getting to know her 30-year-old self, her 30-year-old self is less about offering guidance and more about helping Anamaria tap into what it is she needs and wants for herself and her life. At the end, her older self is able to encourage her younger self to seek help for depression in a way that's not preachy but rather from a place of tremendous love. It may be a short read, but it's packed with themes begging for discussion. Pair this with Under the Mesquite.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tomes And Textiles

    WOW. Full review to come!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    A touching semi-autobiographical novel in verse about a thirteen year old girl in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico in 1999 who's visited by her thirty year old self. I loved fierce and fragile Anamaria, all her fight, and how she grapples authentically with Thirty's weird ideas about self love, poetry, and asking for help. Cw for suicide, disordered eating, femicide A touching semi-autobiographical novel in verse about a thirteen year old girl in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico in 1999 who's visited by her thirty year old self. I loved fierce and fragile Anamaria, all her fight, and how she grapples authentically with Thirty's weird ideas about self love, poetry, and asking for help. Cw for suicide, disordered eating, femicide

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Enjoyed hearing the author read this little story. It pushed the edge of my Spanish listening comprehension, but I liked how the stories of magic, mental health, social conflict, coming of age, and missing & murdered women came together.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    I can't say I've read many novels or books set in Mexico. This was definitely pretty different for me, set in a place and time I'm unfamiliar with, with a lot of language I didn't understand, too. But the story was still relatable, as was the main character, Anamaria. This is written as a series of poems and letters. As I mentioned above, Anamaria writes in a combination of English and Spanish. The book covers an array of topics, including race, bullying, murder, depression and suicide, and femi I can't say I've read many novels or books set in Mexico. This was definitely pretty different for me, set in a place and time I'm unfamiliar with, with a lot of language I didn't understand, too. But the story was still relatable, as was the main character, Anamaria. This is written as a series of poems and letters. As I mentioned above, Anamaria writes in a combination of English and Spanish. The book covers an array of topics, including race, bullying, murder, depression and suicide, and feminism. Many of these things are brought to Anamaria's attention by Thirty, a stranger who appears one day claiming to be Anamaria from seventeen years in the future (aged thirty). She talks to young Anamaria about self love, depression, and the importance of getting help. As she tries to help Anamaria and another mystery girl, clear differences between Thirty's life and Anamaria's become apparent. This addressed such important topics in a great way. It was simple and easy to read, even if I didn't understand some of it (I didn't get very far in Spanish class). It would likely be a fantastic book for young girls from similar backgrounds, suffering with depression, bullying or other problems - or for anyone, honestly. I'm rounding my rating up to 4 stars; I appreciated the messages this book carries and was able to relate to Anamaria in a few ways, but other things were kind of lost on me (which isn't the books fault!).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Starting out, I really felt that I would dnf this one. For one, I was just not vibing with the parts written in verse. Also, our main character's thought process was confusing me immensely and frustrating me. I thought part of the problem was that there were a lot of Spanish references, but then I realized that there were translations (or at least context that helped) for everything that wasn't a proper noun. As I kept reading, I found things I really enjoyed. The dialogue is no written traditio Starting out, I really felt that I would dnf this one. For one, I was just not vibing with the parts written in verse. Also, our main character's thought process was confusing me immensely and frustrating me. I thought part of the problem was that there were a lot of Spanish references, but then I realized that there were translations (or at least context that helped) for everything that wasn't a proper noun. As I kept reading, I found things I really enjoyed. The dialogue is no written traditionally, it's instead in either italics or in script form. I personally liked that element because, when characters are verbally communicating, it's tempting for me to skip over the parts in between their actual quotes. There were times that the italics made it difficult to differentiate between the two characters conversing, but it didn't take me out of the story too much. Along with the dialogue style, I liked how there were no "chapters", just short segments with headings. This made it easy to split my reading up throughout my day without getting lost in where I was, or having to review the context. There was also no info dump at any point, which I didn't like at first, but it turned out to be a good thing because we find that the main character is just as confused by the busyness of her life and we were learning right along with her. The topics discussed in the short book were very relevant to someone of her age; 13-16. She puts too much pressure on herself to be the best academically, and this causes her mental health to spiral out of control. There were also short discussions about feminism, racism, and fatphobia with points that really give good insight into how people her age view these things. The element of her thirty-year-old self coming back to warn her about certain things really gives a reflective tone to her story and highlighted the importance of thinking things through in your life and appreciating what you have, even the little things.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ness (Vynexa)

    Thank you Cinco Puntos via Edelweiss for providing an early copy of Thirty Talks Weird Love. TW: Negative Body Image Ideas, Thoughts of Suicide, Suicide Attempts, Eating Disorders, Academic Obsessive Traits, Missing Girls and Women, Murder of Girls and Women. I would like to start this review off by saying that this story took me for a ride. While reading the summary and the first verses, I couldn't have imagined how heavy this story was going to be. This story is told in verse, which is one of my f Thank you Cinco Puntos via Edelweiss for providing an early copy of Thirty Talks Weird Love. TW: Negative Body Image Ideas, Thoughts of Suicide, Suicide Attempts, Eating Disorders, Academic Obsessive Traits, Missing Girls and Women, Murder of Girls and Women. I would like to start this review off by saying that this story took me for a ride. While reading the summary and the first verses, I couldn't have imagined how heavy this story was going to be. This story is told in verse, which is one of my favorite formats to consume. Not only because it is quicker to get through, but because it flows like poetry. For me, novels written in verse grab me quicker and keep me there until the end. Which is exactly what Thirty Talks Weird Love did to me. For some reason, I thought this was going to be a cute little novel about a thirteen year old meeting her thirty year old self. But my was I wrong. Please go into this story with caution. Review my trigger warnings before starting the story. While it was beautiful, it was heart wrenching, as well. By reading about the author at the end of the book, it seems that a lot of details are based off of her life, but not 100% sure if all of the details are inspired by true events. I will definitely buy a physical copy and add it to my collection. This is a story I would read multiple times throughout my life.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ap

    I have recieved an ARC for this book. Thirty Talks Weird Love takes place in Cuidad Juárez, Mexico, where Anamaria, a thirteen-year-old lives. One day a woman comes up to Anamaria claiming that she is the future self of her. The future woman, Thirty requests for help and offers advice to thirteen-year-old Anamaria. The plot of this book was medium, not too fast or too slow. I really liked the structure of the book. The structure would include conversations between Thirty and Anamaria, poems, and I have recieved an ARC for this book. Thirty Talks Weird Love takes place in Cuidad Juárez, Mexico, where Anamaria, a thirteen-year-old lives. One day a woman comes up to Anamaria claiming that she is the future self of her. The future woman, Thirty requests for help and offers advice to thirteen-year-old Anamaria. The plot of this book was medium, not too fast or too slow. I really liked the structure of the book. The structure would include conversations between Thirty and Anamaria, poems, and verses. What I enjoyed was how caring and sweet Anamaria's parents were to her. I found it wonderful for the reasons how she had ended up naming her parents Chachita and Papiringo. My favorite scene in this book was from a conversation Thirty and Anamaria were having and the book title popped up. That scene was lighthearted. Thirty Talks Weird Love covered many topics such as race, feminism, depression, femicides, and more. This book is about learning how to accept yourself. Overall this book was beautiful and sweet. Important Characters: Anamaria: a thirteen-year-old living in Mexico Thirty: future version of Anamaria Chachita: Anamaria's mother Papiringo: Anamaria's father

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ivana

    “‘Ciudad Juárez es                    la frontera más fabulosa                    y bella del mundo,’ Juan                    Gabriel, our sweet prince of sung border love, sings.                    I feel his words in my bones.                   despite all the death,                    fear and potholes, I                    see my city as a her, a second mami: black    braids cover her brown head ten times. Wrinkles                    like flowers bloom from                    her desert and cement ey “‘Ciudad Juárez es                    la frontera más fabulosa                    y bella del mundo,’ Juan                    Gabriel, our sweet prince of sung border love, sings.                    I feel his words in my bones.                   despite all the death,                    fear and potholes, I                    see my city as a her, a second mami: black    braids cover her brown head ten times. Wrinkles                    like flowers bloom from                    her desert and cement eyes.                    her heart is carved with                    cacti nests where we,                    Juarenses, eat from                    the prickly pears she grows like breasts. I      never could spit her                   milk because she feeds me every day, because                    she’s my beloved home.”                    ~~ From THIRTY TALKS WEIRD LOVE                                 This novel-in-verse by Alessandra Narváez Varela captures what it’s like to both love & fear your home. It follows a white 13-year-old Mexican girl named Anamaría, who recounts living with the daily threat of becoming another statistic in the femicides taking place in Juárez. Anamaría’s an overachiever who has a hard time with her mental health. She meets her thirty-year-old self, who tries to set her on a better path.                                      This book was refreshing & touching. I tandem read & audiobooked it & LOVED that the author narrated it herself. She has a slight accent, which I appreciated, since it broadens the representation of populations whose stories we don’t normally get to hear. Some of us who were raised outside the U.S. do have accents. I also liked the setting & that many of her poems had some español. What I most loved was that it was semi-autobiographical & a way for the author to bear witness to the horrors of femicide.                                       This one’s a #BeyondtheBestsellers pick that more folks should read!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    In 1990s Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, girls were being kidnapped from the streets, so Anamaria’s parents were very careful about where she was in the city and what she was doing. She spends most of her time studying and trying to get top rank in her class at a private middle school, since she plans to be a doctor. Then one day, a limping woman who claims to be Anamaria from the future arrives to change the past. She is by turns frightening, cheesy and just plain strange. The woman also says that she i In 1990s Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, girls were being kidnapped from the streets, so Anamaria’s parents were very careful about where she was in the city and what she was doing. She spends most of her time studying and trying to get top rank in her class at a private middle school, since she plans to be a doctor. Then one day, a limping woman who claims to be Anamaria from the future arrives to change the past. She is by turns frightening, cheesy and just plain strange. The woman also says that she is a poet, not a doctor, something that Anamaria can’t even comprehend. She also insists that Anamaria needs help and needs to change the way she is living and get help. The wild title and cover lead readers to an exploration of depression and overwork in young people in schools. Written in verse, the book also shows the power of being willing to take a chance and find a way to express yourself in poetry and words. Varela chillingly captures the smallness of Varela’s world, a toxic trudge of schoolwork and messed up friendships and working for her parents. Even as everyone works to protect her from the dangers of the streets, they are unaware that the real danger may be invisible and inside Anamaria herself. The writing here is marvelous. Varela shows how halting first attempts at poetry grow into true self expression and a way to release internal pressures. Anamaria shows herself to be deep and thoughtful, far more interesting than the girl striving to beat everyone at school. The author uses clever poetic formats to transform larger poems into something altogether different and drawings combined with words to create apologies and new connections. A deep delve into depression and the power of poetry. Appropriate for ages 10-13.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Porter

    YA, loving ones self Written in verse, this book has a good message, love your self, flaws and all. But for me, the poetry was not easy to understand; the author knew what she wanted to say, but I often couldn't understand what she intended, or I just got lost in the poetry. From Amazon "Out of nowhere, a lady comes up to Anamaria and says she’s her, from the future. But Anamaria’s 13, she knows better than to talk to a stranger. Girls need to be careful, especially in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico - it’s YA, loving ones self Written in verse, this book has a good message, love your self, flaws and all. But for me, the poetry was not easy to understand; the author knew what she wanted to say, but I often couldn't understand what she intended, or I just got lost in the poetry. From Amazon "Out of nowhere, a lady comes up to Anamaria and says she’s her, from the future. But Anamaria’s 13, she knows better than to talk to a stranger. Girls need to be careful, especially in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico - it’s the '90s, and fear is overtaking her beloved city as cases of kidnapped girls and women become alarmingly common. This 30-year-old “future” lady doesn’t seem to be dangerous, but she won’t stop bothering her, switching between cheesy Hallmark advice about being kind to yourself and some mysterious talk about saving a girl. Anamaria definitely doesn’t need any saving, she’s doing just fine. She works hard at her strict, grade-obsessed middle school - so hard that she hardly gets any sleep; so hard that the stress makes her snap not just at mean girls, but even her own (few) friends; so hard that when she does sleep she dreams about dying - but she just wants to do the best she can so she can grow up to be successful. Maybe Thirty’s right, maybe she’s not supposed to be so exhausted with her life, but how can she ask for help when her city is mourning the much bigger tragedy of its stolen girls?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Anamaria is thirteen, the top of her class at a private school, and trying to manage the stress that comes with impressing her hard-working parents and peers. When she meets a woman who claims to be her older self, a door is opened within her to explore what this worry has done to her, edging her closer to a depression that threatens to consume her life. Set in Ciudad Juarez in the late 90s, the city she loves watches girls like her disappear over and over again. Anamaria must also wrestle with Anamaria is thirteen, the top of her class at a private school, and trying to manage the stress that comes with impressing her hard-working parents and peers. When she meets a woman who claims to be her older self, a door is opened within her to explore what this worry has done to her, edging her closer to a depression that threatens to consume her life. Set in Ciudad Juarez in the late 90s, the city she loves watches girls like her disappear over and over again. Anamaria must also wrestle with love for the city as she looks for ways she can love herself to fight her life. Alessandra Narváez Varela writes with a clear focus on voice, capturing Anamaria’ sinner dialogue with a heart and wit that kept me drawn in. Written in verse, she uses the titles of each section to keep the narrative moving and to locate the reader in space/time. She doesn’t shy away from the tangled thoughts that complicate mental health, and doesn’t give Anamaria a linear journey to self-love. Instead, we see the push-pull, the joys, the grief. We are able to watch how everyday occurrences shift the fragile mental development of a preteen. This care and honesty is what makes this book so important.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Yona

    This novel in verse was quick but not necessarily easy. It reminds me a lot of books like The Poet X or Gabi: Girl in Pieces, where a young Latinx girl turns to poetry to help her navigate her self-discovery. However, Anamaria is a much younger protagonist at age 13, and where Xiomara and Gabi are dealing with boys and strained relationships with their moms, she’s instead dealing with depression, anxiety, and low-self esteem. With repeating themes of the missing and murdered girls of Juarez and This novel in verse was quick but not necessarily easy. It reminds me a lot of books like The Poet X or Gabi: Girl in Pieces, where a young Latinx girl turns to poetry to help her navigate her self-discovery. However, Anamaria is a much younger protagonist at age 13, and where Xiomara and Gabi are dealing with boys and strained relationships with their moms, she’s instead dealing with depression, anxiety, and low-self esteem. With repeating themes of the missing and murdered girls of Juarez and suicide, this book goes to some dark places, but it also offers a path through the darkness, tackling the topic of self love just as hard. I can imagine Thirty Talks Weird Love as part of a classroom activity to write a letter to your future (or past) self or a lesson on poetry. The book includes a lot of Spanish wordplay, which will make Latinx readers feel right at home. Non-Spanish speakers won’t be left too in the dark though, since most phrases are translated right away. I enjoyed that the audiobook was written by the author, but I also wish I would’ve been able to read a paper copy of the book to look at the shape of the poems on the page.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    This is a powerful novel in verse that tackles things like body image issues, female friendships, and the constant drive to be the best at something. Written as a series of poems and letters, in a mix of Spanish and English, it's easy to get hooked into the story. It's a quick read, but that doesn't take away from the overall messages of the book. Like with most verse novels, I would actually recommend the audiobook because once again, it is read by the author herself. Honestly, I think all verse This is a powerful novel in verse that tackles things like body image issues, female friendships, and the constant drive to be the best at something. Written as a series of poems and letters, in a mix of Spanish and English, it's easy to get hooked into the story. It's a quick read, but that doesn't take away from the overall messages of the book. Like with most verse novels, I would actually recommend the audiobook because once again, it is read by the author herself. Honestly, I think all verse novels should be read by the author because poetry is so much more effective if read by the person who wrote it. I highly recommend reading/listening to the author's note at the end because she explains her inspiration for the book and how it relates to her own life. There are little gems in there, too! While I don't necessarily think the cover does this book any favors, it's a book that you definitely won't forget after reading it. There are ample opportunities for discussion and I would recommend it for teens who love poetry and hard hitting topics.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Justin Hall

    This was a weird but pretty inspiring book. Weird might not be the right word...unconventional? Thanks for PRHAudio always taking me out of my comfort reading/listening experience. This book deals with some heavy subjects and basically argues that we should be honest and careful with ourselves and love ourselves. Part scifi and part motivation story, Anamaria our main character is struggling in junior high with self esteem and body issues among other external issues. She is visited by a woman fr This was a weird but pretty inspiring book. Weird might not be the right word...unconventional? Thanks for PRHAudio always taking me out of my comfort reading/listening experience. This book deals with some heavy subjects and basically argues that we should be honest and careful with ourselves and love ourselves. Part scifi and part motivation story, Anamaria our main character is struggling in junior high with self esteem and body issues among other external issues. She is visited by a woman from claiming to be her from the future. Thirty( Anamaria from the future) goes back in time to her 13 year old self and gives hope and inspiration to change her life path. Was a quick listen and very entertaining.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Arlette

    Honestly, it's a travesty this book isn't getting the love it deserves. A fantasy YA novel-in-verse set in 1999 Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. We meet 13-year-old Anamaria as she navigates through school, friendships, and her burgeoning adolescence when she is visited by a woman claiming to be her 30-year-old self. Most featured themes are universally felt while providing insights into growing up in Ciudad Juarez where a startling number of missing girls and women and femicides occur. The seamless weavin Honestly, it's a travesty this book isn't getting the love it deserves. A fantasy YA novel-in-verse set in 1999 Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. We meet 13-year-old Anamaria as she navigates through school, friendships, and her burgeoning adolescence when she is visited by a woman claiming to be her 30-year-old self. Most featured themes are universally felt while providing insights into growing up in Ciudad Juarez where a startling number of missing girls and women and femicides occur. The seamless weaving of Spanish and English speaks to bilingual readers as it also maintains an inclusive space for the English-only audience. 4.75/5 stars

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    This is one of those books where the message is powerful, and there are glimmers of great writing, but the overall effect left me wanting more. The blackout poems are my favorite: they're emotional gut punches. I love the overall premise of Anamaria's 30-year-old self interacting with her 13-year-old-self, and I love how the book voices the lost girls/women of Ciudad Juarez. I just wish the writing had been more consistently excellent. This is one of those books where the message is powerful, and there are glimmers of great writing, but the overall effect left me wanting more. The blackout poems are my favorite: they're emotional gut punches. I love the overall premise of Anamaria's 30-year-old self interacting with her 13-year-old-self, and I love how the book voices the lost girls/women of Ciudad Juarez. I just wish the writing had been more consistently excellent.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alma

    Anamaria’s story is told in verse, and is one that will resonate with young teens. It would pair well with a book club, as questions can be asked and issues discussed that may help anyone who might be feeling the same issues as Anamaria. Read more about this powerful book on my blog: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress.... Anamaria’s story is told in verse, and is one that will resonate with young teens. It would pair well with a book club, as questions can be asked and issues discussed that may help anyone who might be feeling the same issues as Anamaria. Read more about this powerful book on my blog: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress....

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Bizarre, but in the good-interesting kind of way. Time travel that makes no attempt to explain itself, which kind of fits with the story, even if I didn't appreciate it. Sad, upsetting, vaguely hopeful. This is a good book for ennui. The audiobook narration by the author is beautiful, worth the short listen. Bizarre, but in the good-interesting kind of way. Time travel that makes no attempt to explain itself, which kind of fits with the story, even if I didn't appreciate it. Sad, upsetting, vaguely hopeful. This is a good book for ennui. The audiobook narration by the author is beautiful, worth the short listen.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Markulik

    I'm very familiar with Ciudad Juárez in that time period as i grew up in El Paso. I initially didn't want to read bc i thought it'd be too "heavy.". This book tackled a hard hitting topic beautifully. The audiobook read by the author was awesome. I'm very familiar with Ciudad Juárez in that time period as i grew up in El Paso. I initially didn't want to read bc i thought it'd be too "heavy.". This book tackled a hard hitting topic beautifully. The audiobook read by the author was awesome.

  21. 5 out of 5

    kim baccellia

    Powerful free verse novel of a young Mexican girl who learns from her future self that there is more to life than being first on an honor roll list. Addresses subjects such as depression, body awareness, friendship, and guilt in such a way that it's sure to resonate with readers. Powerful free verse novel of a young Mexican girl who learns from her future self that there is more to life than being first on an honor roll list. Addresses subjects such as depression, body awareness, friendship, and guilt in such a way that it's sure to resonate with readers.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    This book is unlike anything else I’ve ever read. It’s a combination of poetry and prose, and is incredibly nuanced.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Carmensutra

    I finished this book at the perfect moment in time and it made it so much more impactful for me. Rull review to come, but this novel-in-verse time travel book was exceptional.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Linda Stack-Nelson

    13-year-old each of us deserves to be met where we are, to have our grief listened to, and to do it all in honest verse.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    Utterly original novel in verse that had me so engrossed I finished it in one sitting.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Raven Black

    The journey of perfection and how we see imperfection is truly perfection. Deep thoughts nicely created in poetic imagery.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Luciana Herman

    Truly brilliant and poignant. This masterpiece is poetic beyond the verse in which it is written. Brava, Alessandra Narváez Varela!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Great Books

    Reviewer #14

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Oswald

    Just not a fan of the writing style. I found it hard to follow.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Natty S

    Beautiful.

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