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Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed: 15 Voices from the Latinx Diaspora

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Edited by The Bronx Is Reading founder Saraciea Fennell and featuring an all-star cast of Latinx contributors, an anthology unlike any other in the young adult market now. In Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed, bestselling and award-winning authors as well as up-and-coming voices interrogate the different myths and stereotypes about the Latinx diaspora. These 15 original pieces de Edited by The Bronx Is Reading founder Saraciea Fennell and featuring an all-star cast of Latinx contributors, an anthology unlike any other in the young adult market now. In Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed, bestselling and award-winning authors as well as up-and-coming voices interrogate the different myths and stereotypes about the Latinx diaspora. These 15 original pieces delve into everything from ghost stories and superheroes, to memories in the kitchen and travels around the world, to addiction and grief, to identity and anti-Blackness, to finding love and speaking your truth. Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed features bestselling and award-winning authors as well as new, up-and-coming voices, including: Elizabeth Acevedo Cristina Arreola Ingrid Rojas Contreras Naima Coster Natasha Diaz Kahlil Haywood Zakiya Jamal Janel Martinez Jasminne Mendez Meg Medina Mark Oshiro Julian Randall Lilliam Rivera Ibi Zoboi Full of both sorrow and joy, Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed is an essential celebration of this rich and diverse community.


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Edited by The Bronx Is Reading founder Saraciea Fennell and featuring an all-star cast of Latinx contributors, an anthology unlike any other in the young adult market now. In Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed, bestselling and award-winning authors as well as up-and-coming voices interrogate the different myths and stereotypes about the Latinx diaspora. These 15 original pieces de Edited by The Bronx Is Reading founder Saraciea Fennell and featuring an all-star cast of Latinx contributors, an anthology unlike any other in the young adult market now. In Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed, bestselling and award-winning authors as well as up-and-coming voices interrogate the different myths and stereotypes about the Latinx diaspora. These 15 original pieces delve into everything from ghost stories and superheroes, to memories in the kitchen and travels around the world, to addiction and grief, to identity and anti-Blackness, to finding love and speaking your truth. Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed features bestselling and award-winning authors as well as new, up-and-coming voices, including: Elizabeth Acevedo Cristina Arreola Ingrid Rojas Contreras Naima Coster Natasha Diaz Kahlil Haywood Zakiya Jamal Janel Martinez Jasminne Mendez Meg Medina Mark Oshiro Julian Randall Lilliam Rivera Ibi Zoboi Full of both sorrow and joy, Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed is an essential celebration of this rich and diverse community.

30 review for Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed: 15 Voices from the Latinx Diaspora

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zoraida

    Review for shelf awarenness.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Giveaway Win!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ness (Vynexa)

    Thank you Flatiron Books for providing me with an early copy of Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed! When I came across this anthology on my twitter timeline, I immediately wanted an early copy of it. I digitally ran over to Netgalley and requested it the second I saw it up. Unfortunately, I am still waiting to see if I have been approved or not. Luckily, I came across a few instagram giveaways that were providing early physical copies and you know I had to enter all of them. Somehow, my entry was picked a Thank you Flatiron Books for providing me with an early copy of Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed! When I came across this anthology on my twitter timeline, I immediately wanted an early copy of it. I digitally ran over to Netgalley and requested it the second I saw it up. Unfortunately, I am still waiting to see if I have been approved or not. Luckily, I came across a few instagram giveaways that were providing early physical copies and you know I had to enter all of them. Somehow, my entry was picked and I became the proud owner of one. This collection of non-fiction stories by authors from the Latinx diaspora is so important for many reasons. However, the most important reason is due to the majority of the authors selected are Afro-Latinx/Black/Indigenous, who are historically forgotten when speaking about Latinx people/history. It was amazing getting to read their life stories, especially since my brother on my mom's side is Afro-Cuban. Even though we come from the same mother, our lives and walks through it are on two different spectrums. It helped him understand what life for him was most likely like, as we've never really spoken about it. Apart from that, this was my first anthology in a very long time. It was enjoyable seeing many authors and their stories along with their writings come together, allowing me to get to know them. There are many authors I'd never read anything from, but am intrigued to check their other works out. I recommend this anthology to every one, even other Latinx folks, especially white/white passing Latinx. Many of us need to learn and reflect on how we abide by White Supremacy while being quick to correct people when they say we are white. OVERALL RATING: ⭐️4 STARS⭐️

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mallory

    This book was really well done. It deals with very heavy topics, but the voices telling their stories were excellent. I loved the variety of experiences that were captured in this collection. Books of essays aren’t typically my first go to, but I am so glad I won a copy of this book on Goodreads. I am not Lantinix, but it was excellent to get to read about some of the perspectives to help me understand this culture better. I highly recommend this book which I devoured in one day.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    These are more essays than short stories. Which is on me. I didn’t think about how “anthology” can mean many things. I think this is good. I think it will get recommended a lot. But it’s also a book that is very clearly not for me. Which is okay. I think it’s going to mean a lot to readers seeing themselves for the first time. Although it’s marketed as YA and has a really stellar lineup of YA authors, I’d push back on this being strictly YA. This feels a lot like something that would be assigned These are more essays than short stories. Which is on me. I didn’t think about how “anthology” can mean many things. I think this is good. I think it will get recommended a lot. But it’s also a book that is very clearly not for me. Which is okay. I think it’s going to mean a lot to readers seeing themselves for the first time. Although it’s marketed as YA and has a really stellar lineup of YA authors, I’d push back on this being strictly YA. This feels a lot like something that would be assigned in a hip college course (and maybe an ambitious high school course) which is good because nonfiction like that is hard to find. I’m not sure who the actual audience for this book will be. It will, of course, be an invaluable mirror to Latinx teens and be a window for other readers. But even with the snazzy cover and the author lineup I question how many teens browsing a library or bookstore will pick this one up on their own.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Graciella Delgado

    A beautiful collection of writing pieces across numerous perspectives and voices from our expansive and broad diaspora. The book of 15 writers and stories to tell covers what it means to be recognized for one's identity by those within and outside of the diaspora. It covers death and grief. It covers womanhood and navigating queerness and religion. There is so much love and struggle explored that hits so close to home, with other stories broadening our understanding of what it truly means to be A beautiful collection of writing pieces across numerous perspectives and voices from our expansive and broad diaspora. The book of 15 writers and stories to tell covers what it means to be recognized for one's identity by those within and outside of the diaspora. It covers death and grief. It covers womanhood and navigating queerness and religion. There is so much love and struggle explored that hits so close to home, with other stories broadening our understanding of what it truly means to be a community and support one another. In this exploration of race, ethnicity, language, politics, and layered connections to cultural identity, we are presented with something very raw and honest.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Hillis

    Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed features personal stories from a variety of Latinx authors. Themes: identity, sexuality, racism, Black experience, Latinx experience, colonialism, immigration, assimilation, imposter syndrome, language trauma, mental health, agency over one’s body and life Writers from across the Latinx diaspora interrogate the different myths and stereotypes about this rich and diverse community. Eres Un Pocho by Mark Oshiro The Price of Admission by Naima Coster Caution Song by Natasha Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed features personal stories from a variety of Latinx authors. Themes: identity, sexuality, racism, Black experience, Latinx experience, colonialism, immigration, assimilation, imposter syndrome, language trauma, mental health, agency over one’s body and life Writers from across the Latinx diaspora interrogate the different myths and stereotypes about this rich and diverse community. Eres Un Pocho by Mark Oshiro The Price of Admission by Naima Coster Caution Song by Natasha Diaz The Mark of a Good Man by Meg Medina #Julian4SpiderMan by Julian Randall Half In, Half Out by Saraciea J. Fennell Haitian Sensation by Ibi Zoboi The Land, The Ghosts, and Me by Cristina Arreola Paraíso Negro by Kahlil Haywood Cuban Imposter Syndrome by Zakiya N. Jamal More Than Nervios by Lilliam Rivera Alaiyo by Jasminne Mendez Invisible by Ingrid Rojas Contreras Abuela’s Greatest Gift by Janel Martinez A Mi Orden: A Meditation on Dichos by Elizabeth Acevedo This is a book that will make many feel seen, heard, and empowered. Do yourself a favor, and read it. I’ll definitely be checking out other works by these authors. CW: racism, racial slurs, colorism, microaggressions, substance use, homophobia, suicidal thoughts/ideation/attempt

  8. 4 out of 5

    Oscreads

    There were some really standout essays in this collection. I loved seeing so many new and exciting Latinx voices in this book. Can’t wait to see what else they put out.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Julith Perry

    My heart. This was such a beautiful anthology. I cried for most of it because I just felt so much of the words written here. I think everyone needs to read this book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Celadon Phoenix

    There is no other book that is quite like Wild Tongues Can’t be Tamed. More than just essays from people in the Latinx diaspora this book also has a lot to say about Afro-Latinx intersectionality. Either through my lack of searching or simply lack of books I have never read a book with so much Afro-Latinx representation. I took the most pleasure in slowing down and gently unfolding and listening to the stories being told. I found that I connected so much with a lot of the struggles depicted in th There is no other book that is quite like Wild Tongues Can’t be Tamed. More than just essays from people in the Latinx diaspora this book also has a lot to say about Afro-Latinx intersectionality. Either through my lack of searching or simply lack of books I have never read a book with so much Afro-Latinx representation. I took the most pleasure in slowing down and gently unfolding and listening to the stories being told. I found that I connected so much with a lot of the struggles depicted in these stories even though I am not a member of the Latinx community. I thought it was a wonderful way of showing struggle and also having community, culture, resources, and hope to fall back on. Every of this book is a masterpiece from the way the stories are arranged to the words that build to moments of clarity. I wish there were more books like this one in the world. If there were, the world would probably be a more honest place. I really believe in having places to let minorities speak freely and allow themselves to tell and to be listened to and I feel like this is a step towards that being an intrinsic part of our society. This book should be on everyone's bookshelf. —Thank You High Five Books for providing this ARC—

  11. 5 out of 5

    Caylie Ratzlaff

    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this eARC of the anthology (for which I was SUPER excited for). 4/5 stars. This was WAY more critical in terms of theory and positionality than I expected. I was honestly expecting this to be geared more YA, but I would expect these texts to be read at a critical level in college courses or DEI courses. I do think high schoolers could handle them -- and need to read them -- but it would require a lot of frontloading of information for them to understand Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this eARC of the anthology (for which I was SUPER excited for). 4/5 stars. This was WAY more critical in terms of theory and positionality than I expected. I was honestly expecting this to be geared more YA, but I would expect these texts to be read at a critical level in college courses or DEI courses. I do think high schoolers could handle them -- and need to read them -- but it would require a lot of frontloading of information for them to understand it. Past my teacher perspective -- this book is not and was not meant for me. I say this honestly as a white woman. It was eye opening and I knew and can understand many of the problems and critical theory within the text, but I am not meant to connect with it. I am not the target audience for this text -- and that is okay. I also was thrilled with the inclusion of Black voices within the Latinx diaspora. I was not expecting the dynamic and varied amount of voices. It was beautiful. It provided a critical look at the foundations in the Latinx community, the anti-Blackness within the community, and the work that needs to be done. The essays were powerful and poignant. SUCH a good read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    An anthology of reflections on what it means to be Latinx, with a specific focus on the diversity and under representation of the Afro-Latinx experience. “I think about what we lose when we deny the complexity of our stories, our families, and ourselves in service of some victorious narrative-the desire to declare ourselves triumphant, worthy, palatable to whiteness. I think about the testimonies and self-expression we lose, as well as the opportunities to accept ourselves and connect to one ano An anthology of reflections on what it means to be Latinx, with a specific focus on the diversity and under representation of the Afro-Latinx experience. “I think about what we lose when we deny the complexity of our stories, our families, and ourselves in service of some victorious narrative-the desire to declare ourselves triumphant, worthy, palatable to whiteness. I think about the testimonies and self-expression we lose, as well as the opportunities to accept ourselves and connect to one another.” -Naima Coster

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nawal Q Casiano

    Important collection of Latinx diaspora voices and all the gorgeous texture that immigration and exploration of roots cultivates. There are essays on beauty, alcoholism, colorism, proximity to whiteness, mental health stigma, relationships with fathers, uncles and in-laws. The whole purpose of this collection is to platform voices not traditionally represented on the shelves, and it does just that. Beautifully curated and incredibly important addition to our reading lives.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Yessica

    A wonderful read that hits close to the heart and shows the immense diversity of the Latinx experience. Invisible by Ingrid Rojas Contreras hit the closest and got me to tears and rage. Made me realize how much healing I have to be from growing up and navigating within white suprematist racist families. Also has inspired me to write about my own experiences, a great feeling to have when you finish a piece.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Thank you to the author, publisher, and NetGalley for the ARC of this title. Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed is a beautifully curated anthology. The collection of voices is powerful. It is labeled as Teens and YA, but it is heavy on theory.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Thank you Flatiron Books for sending me an ARC in exchange of my honest opinion. This anthology is a gem, and I need everyone to read it. It collects stories from many perspectives of the Latinx diaspora, focusing mainly on Afro-Latines and Indigenous-Latines. They delve into gender identity, sexual orientation, race, culture, among other topics that are present in our day by day. I loved every single essay since it presented the experience of each author while navigating their identity. My f Thank you Flatiron Books for sending me an ARC in exchange of my honest opinion. This anthology is a gem, and I need everyone to read it. It collects stories from many perspectives of the Latinx diaspora, focusing mainly on Afro-Latines and Indigenous-Latines. They delve into gender identity, sexual orientation, race, culture, among other topics that are present in our day by day. I loved every single essay since it presented the experience of each author while navigating their identity. My favorite essays were Elizabeth Acevedo’s, Zakiya N. Jamal’s, Janel Martinez’s, Mark Oshiro’s, and Saraciea J. Fennell’s.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tim Oldakowski

    Fascinating. I learned so much from these writers.

  18. 4 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed is a collection of essays about being more than stereotypes. It showcases variety, introduces conversations, and features a fantastic list of authors. For you, it may serve as a list of favorites or inspire a TBR. For me, it's a combination of both with some of my all time favorites like Mark Oshiro as well as newer authors to me. As a whole, Wild Tongues C (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed is a collection of essays about being more than stereotypes. It showcases variety, introduces conversations, and features a fantastic list of authors. For you, it may serve as a list of favorites or inspire a TBR. For me, it's a combination of both with some of my all time favorites like Mark Oshiro as well as newer authors to me. As a whole, Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed is full of heart, vulnerability, and love. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lacey Book Bug

    I mean…this is the best book I’ve read all year. 5 Perfect Stars! When I tell you, half of this book is highlighted…I am not exaggerating. I took something away from EACH essay. Some of these stories so perfectly captured experiences I had never fully confronted, that it brought me to tears. This book is a necessity for all people, but as an Afro-Latina, this book is necessary for those of us who often felt they couldn’t fully claim Latinidad because we were Black. We aren’t alone. We were never I mean…this is the best book I’ve read all year. 5 Perfect Stars! When I tell you, half of this book is highlighted…I am not exaggerating. I took something away from EACH essay. Some of these stories so perfectly captured experiences I had never fully confronted, that it brought me to tears. This book is a necessity for all people, but as an Afro-Latina, this book is necessary for those of us who often felt they couldn’t fully claim Latinidad because we were Black. We aren’t alone. We were never alone. These essays capture so much more than just race, culture and ethnicity. These stories cover queer experiences, gender roles, confronting generational hurt, and navigating the Americas in the midst of all of this. Perfection. I’m gifting a hardcover of this book to each of my family members and friends that I know will be so grateful to read stories that validate their experiences and to feel comforted in knowing we have never been alone.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Boss

    this beautiful collection of short stories is 🔥 each story is a personal exploration of the Latinx diaspora from the writer’s point-of-view and lived experiences. many of the writers were simultaneously sharing their exploration of the Black diaspora and all of the stereotypes and racism and biases and identity confusion. it’s really wonderful! coming out November 2nd!! 🎉 thank you so much to @canessacozt for hosting the giveaway and to @flatiron for the ARC! “and the idea that we can our dignit this beautiful collection of short stories is 🔥 each story is a personal exploration of the Latinx diaspora from the writer’s point-of-view and lived experiences. many of the writers were simultaneously sharing their exploration of the Black diaspora and all of the stereotypes and racism and biases and identity confusion. it’s really wonderful! coming out November 2nd!! 🎉 thank you so much to @canessacozt for hosting the giveaway and to @flatiron for the ARC! “and the idea that we can our dignity is deceptive. when has virtue ever been sufficient to save Black and brown lives? who gets to decide what virtue is or who is virtuous? and aren’t we all all much more multidimensional and messy than ‘bad’ or ‘good’? or is that complexity reserved only for white people - US citizens?” - Naima Coster

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Morris

    This was a Goodreads Giveaway win book for me! I was so happy to have received this advanced copy in the mail!! I stepped out of my Black YA box and read stories by Latinx writers. Let me tell you…These 15 stories were AMAZING! I couldn’t put this book down. I enjoyed using Google Translate to look up words and phrases used in these stories. There’s so many different Latinxs-Honduran, Dominican, Afro-Latina and so much more and they each have their own style and differences but similarities at t This was a Goodreads Giveaway win book for me! I was so happy to have received this advanced copy in the mail!! I stepped out of my Black YA box and read stories by Latinx writers. Let me tell you…These 15 stories were AMAZING! I couldn’t put this book down. I enjoyed using Google Translate to look up words and phrases used in these stories. There’s so many different Latinxs-Honduran, Dominican, Afro-Latina and so much more and they each have their own style and differences but similarities at the same time. ALL Latinxs will appreciate this beautiful body of work. As someone who is not, I learned so much and appreciated a different type of culture that I’m not a part of. Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful!

  22. 5 out of 5

    goldenbookhunter

    Saraciea and all the authors included in this anthology about the Latinx Diaspora did their thing…y’all this is a must read! I dog-eared this book like crazy because there are so many great points. 100% going to reread this & there will be several future posts highlighting this book because there’s so much to say Individually, each written story is powerful, but combined they’re ultra powerful. Together they show the diverse experience of the Afro-Latin community that has been overlooked and unde Saraciea and all the authors included in this anthology about the Latinx Diaspora did their thing…y’all this is a must read! I dog-eared this book like crazy because there are so many great points. 100% going to reread this & there will be several future posts highlighting this book because there’s so much to say Individually, each written story is powerful, but combined they’re ultra powerful. Together they show the diverse experience of the Afro-Latin community that has been overlooked and undervalued For those who don’t know, Afro-Latin is a term that includes people from Latin American countries with African ancestry The absolute beauty of this collection of stories, is that they showcase some of the shared experiences of Afro-Latinx while also giving space for differing opinions. For example, several authors talk about how their acceptance by the Latinx community was/is a challenge because they don’t speak Spanish and/or their skin is considered too dark or hair too curly. There’s a common struggle for Afro-Latinx people to be Latinx enough because society has created and normalized a specific phenotype associated with Latinx that completely disregards the reality of African slave trade. No matter how the media continues to portray one type of Latin, THERE ARE BLACK PEOPLE THAT HAVE LONG BEEN ROOTED IN LATIN COUNTRIES. The anti-Black and colorist sentiment in this community is truly shameful and saddening On the flip side, there are some authors who wrote that they embrace the term Afro-Latinx and others who don’t and are instead in favor of identifying as Black. I love that this book didn’t skew one way or another. Instead, it allowed the authors to voice and stand in their truths while respecting that other authors included may think differently. I always advocate for more than diversity based on outward appearance because our lives experiences and personalities…etc exist on a spectrum. There isn’t just one or two ways to be Black or Afro-Latinx or a woman or LGBTQIA+ I highly recommend!!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tanisha

    Favorite Quotes: "This is what has surprised me about motherhood--how near mourning is to joy." P.29 (The Price of Admission by Naima Coster) "Men only love their children through their wives." P.38 (The Mark of a Good Man by Meg Medina) "Invisibility can be your only refuge. Like every refuge, invisibility can be taken away. The consequence of being seen is that you're seen." P. 63 (#JulianforSpiderMan by Julian Randall "Inclusion in today's society should be used to inform all decisions. Being Favorite Quotes: "This is what has surprised me about motherhood--how near mourning is to joy." P.29 (The Price of Admission by Naima Coster) "Men only love their children through their wives." P.38 (The Mark of a Good Man by Meg Medina) "Invisibility can be your only refuge. Like every refuge, invisibility can be taken away. The consequence of being seen is that you're seen." P. 63 (#JulianforSpiderMan by Julian Randall "Inclusion in today's society should be used to inform all decisions. Being inclusive is not only applicable to balance and consideration of race and ethnicity. Inclusion should take into account the sensitivies and opinions of genders, educational levels, and ages." P. 132 (Paraiso Negro by Kahlil Haywood) "Depression is a luxury only afforded to people with wealth....Seeking medical help for anything dwelling in the mind is really meant only for a privileged few." P. 161 ( More Than Nervios by Lilliam Rivera) "I didn't know back then, but I know now, this is how the worst of whiteness works. Insults are tied up in acts of kindness. Judgments are laced under cover of benevolence. No harm done is ever done on purpose. There is an excuse for everything." P. 194 (Invisible by Ingrid Rojas contreras) "Not only does Latinidad erase Blackness and Indigenity, but it also relies on one's proximity to whiteness, as well as how much privilege one has based on gender, sexual preference, socioeconomic status, immigrant status, language spoken, and mobility, among other things. Those who find themselves closest to what's "socially acceptable" benefit most." P. 226 (Abuela's Greatest Gift by Janel Martinez)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sacha

    5 stars I loved this and hope there is another installment coming soon. In fact, I'd like to see a whole series! YA has many merits, but variety within subgenres isn't really on that list. That's just a part of why this collection is so fantastic. Full disclosure: I wanted to read this because of the cover and the all-star list of writers. I did not lose out in my laziness this time, so readers taking a similar approach should know that it may actually work! The essays here present intersectiona 5 stars I loved this and hope there is another installment coming soon. In fact, I'd like to see a whole series! YA has many merits, but variety within subgenres isn't really on that list. That's just a part of why this collection is so fantastic. Full disclosure: I wanted to read this because of the cover and the all-star list of writers. I did not lose out in my laziness this time, so readers taking a similar approach should know that it may actually work! The essays here present intersectional identities and heterogeneous experiences that are riveting. One struggle with collections is usually that some of the entries blow your mind and others are just okay. For me, every entry here is really strong, and a few of them will stay with me for years. While I read part of the book on my Kindle, I received an audio version about 1/4 of the way into my adventure, and I HIGHLY recommend that. Each author voices their own text, and that makes an incredible impact, especially in the personal narrative format. It's one thing to imagine a persona's emotion and a whole other to actually feel it coming through your speakers. I will recommend this highly to students and apt audiences for a long time and will absolutely consider teaching chunks of it. What a gem! *Special thanks to NetGalley and Flatiron for the arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. The opinions expressed here are my own. Added thanks to Libro.fm for the audio, which is awesome.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    She stepped into a garden. A garden filled with many vibrant flowers. Luscious pinks, golden yellows, burnished reds, calming purples… a rainbow of colors erupting in her field of vision. Amongst the flowers were people from all walks of life. Those of different ages and cultures. A beautiful gathering of humans amongst the garden. She smiled as she took it all in… smelling the heady fragrance of the flowers as she watched each person and tried to imagine their story. Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed She stepped into a garden. A garden filled with many vibrant flowers. Luscious pinks, golden yellows, burnished reds, calming purples… a rainbow of colors erupting in her field of vision. Amongst the flowers were people from all walks of life. Those of different ages and cultures. A beautiful gathering of humans amongst the garden. She smiled as she took it all in… smelling the heady fragrance of the flowers as she watched each person and tried to imagine their story. Wild Tongues Can’t Be Tamed is an anthology filled with personal essays from many writers, including a favorite of mine, Elizabeth Acevedo. Each story tells the story of the writer and their exploration of their culture, their sexuality, and their identity. Each author shares their personal tale of what it was like to grow up and how they grappled with learning about who they were as an individual and how their background and culture shapes them now. I loved getting an in depth look into their inner thoughts and getting immersed into a variety of cultures as I learned some background into each author. Now, as with any short story collection, I enjoyed some more than others, but each was unique and I wanted more. If you’re a fan of short story collections and want to learn more about Black and Latinx culture, then don’t miss out on this anthology! *No Rating for Nonfiction as these are all personal stories. TW: Racism, Racial Slurs, Micro aggressions, Drug/Alcohol Use, Homophobia, Suicidal Thoughts/Ideation/Attempt. *I received a gifted copy of this book from the publisher for my honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Black

    📚 So, here you are too foreign for home, too foreign for here. Never enough for both 📚 - Diaspora Blues I’m so glad that I was approved for a copy of WILD TONGUES CAN'T BE TAMED. It has been a book I really needed as a diaspora myself searching to find the balance between the two cultures that define me. I’m Guatemalan by birth and American by way of adoption. I didn’t grow up in a home where Spanish was spoken nor any traditional dishes were cooked or I grew up hearing cultural stories and lore. A 📚 So, here you are too foreign for home, too foreign for here. Never enough for both 📚 - Diaspora Blues I’m so glad that I was approved for a copy of WILD TONGUES CAN'T BE TAMED. It has been a book I really needed as a diaspora myself searching to find the balance between the two cultures that define me. I’m Guatemalan by birth and American by way of adoption. I didn’t grow up in a home where Spanish was spoken nor any traditional dishes were cooked or I grew up hearing cultural stories and lore. And I didn’t really care to learn either until recently when I started to realize a part of me was missing. A part that longed to belong to the culture of my past but felt too disconnected to do anything about it or even know how to go about that. It’s confusing. It hurts. And messes with your head. I’m so grateful for this book and I cried when I read the first chapter because I finally felt heard. My feelings were validated. I wasn’t crazy for feeling like this. I’m honestly just so excited for the people this book is going to help heal and the bridges it’s going to connect. With prolific voices from Elizabeth Acevedo to Mark Oshiro, the collection of stories and vibrant prose from authors from all different Latin diasporic backgrounds is sure to leave you breathless, seen, and understood. ⭐️ 4.5/5 Stars!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    On my quest to read more short pieces for my American lit classes, I've stumbled upon a few anthologies with some great writing, this one being no exception. "Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed" (after "How to Tame a Wild Tongue" by Gloria Anzaldua) is an anthology of 15 essays written by some of today's well-known Latinx writers, mostly YA. Each author tells their story of growing up in America, faced with difficulties brought upon them by racism, colorism, sexism, and more. I enjoyed many of these es On my quest to read more short pieces for my American lit classes, I've stumbled upon a few anthologies with some great writing, this one being no exception. "Wild Tongues Can't Be Tamed" (after "How to Tame a Wild Tongue" by Gloria Anzaldua) is an anthology of 15 essays written by some of today's well-known Latinx writers, mostly YA. Each author tells their story of growing up in America, faced with difficulties brought upon them by racism, colorism, sexism, and more. I enjoyed many of these essays, and even found a few I could use in my classroom this year! But like every anthology, there were a few pieces that didn't work for me. Some of the themes in the essay were repetitive, which perhaps is more of a statement about the United States than it is the writing of the authors, but perhaps a different organization would have broken up some of the more similar pieces in the middle, making it read a bit faster through the middle. If you're an educator looking for some short narrative creative nonfiction, definitely think of adding a few of these stories to your curriculum.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    In this rich collection of essays edited by contributor Saraceia J. Fennell, the world of the Latinx experience talks about the unseen side of diversity in the international community. She was inspired by the lack of representation of her own community. The essays cover everything from love and addiction to topics like mental health and LGBTQ identities. I loved the voices in this book. Entire worlds and experiences opened up to me through these essays about people who rarely get a platform. Fro In this rich collection of essays edited by contributor Saraceia J. Fennell, the world of the Latinx experience talks about the unseen side of diversity in the international community. She was inspired by the lack of representation of her own community. The essays cover everything from love and addiction to topics like mental health and LGBTQ identities. I loved the voices in this book. Entire worlds and experiences opened up to me through these essays about people who rarely get a platform. From the eyes of gifted, deep, and insightful writers, these gorgeous gave me a glimpse into different experiences from Mexico, Honduras, Cuba, and beyond. I was particularly touched by the coming of age and coming out stories. This book is an essential read for anyone looking to expand their horizons to a wider world. To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/sar...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leslie Zampetti

    Brilliant! Fennell's collection of essays brings together writers with often similar, yet uniquely individual, perspectives on the Latinx Diaspora. Each essay should be savored in its richness. This collection brings voices to the table who have long been shunted aside or ignored in the kitchen. And while it may speak strongest to those who belong to the communities represented here, all readers would benefit from reading these vivid and thoughtful explorations of culture, community, family, and Brilliant! Fennell's collection of essays brings together writers with often similar, yet uniquely individual, perspectives on the Latinx Diaspora. Each essay should be savored in its richness. This collection brings voices to the table who have long been shunted aside or ignored in the kitchen. And while it may speak strongest to those who belong to the communities represented here, all readers would benefit from reading these vivid and thoughtful explorations of culture, community, family, and home. As a white Jewish woman, Ingrid Rojas Contreras's "Invisible" resonated so strongly with me in its depiction of family-by-marriage dynamics that strive to silence those who are different and her struggle with in-laws who raised her husband who loves her, yet cannot understand why their beliefs, actions - even their love - is anathema and poisonous to her.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura Lou

    I have such a hard time with anthologies. Some stories are five stars and phenomenal, others fall flat. Overall I was surprised by limited the representation was in the book. Nearly half the stories share a theme about struggling to understand the identity of being both Black and Latinx. That’s wonderful! But if that’s the focus of the book, then make it the whole focus? Instead it just feels like too many people wrote about the same story? I think some of these stories could be used in school t I have such a hard time with anthologies. Some stories are five stars and phenomenal, others fall flat. Overall I was surprised by limited the representation was in the book. Nearly half the stories share a theme about struggling to understand the identity of being both Black and Latinx. That’s wonderful! But if that’s the focus of the book, then make it the whole focus? Instead it just feels like too many people wrote about the same story? I think some of these stories could be used in school to help unpack identity! I enjoyed listening to the stories by the authors. If you like anthologies or you’re seeking to understand the complexities with being both Black and Latinx then this would be a great book for you!

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