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The Whisper on the Night Wind: The True History of a Wilderness Legend

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NATIONAL BESTSELLER Spellbinding adventure from Canada's most beloved modern-day explorer. Traverspine is not a place you will find on most maps. A century ago, it stood near the foothills of the remote Mealy Mountains in central Labrador. Today it is an abandoned ghost town, almost all trace of it swallowed up by dark spruce woods that cloak millions of acres. In the early NATIONAL BESTSELLER Spellbinding adventure from Canada's most beloved modern-day explorer. Traverspine is not a place you will find on most maps. A century ago, it stood near the foothills of the remote Mealy Mountains in central Labrador. Today it is an abandoned ghost town, almost all trace of it swallowed up by dark spruce woods that cloak millions of acres. In the early 1900s, this isolated little settlement was the scene of an extraordinary haunting by large creatures none could identify. Strange tracks were found in the woods. Unearthly cries were heard in the night. Sled dogs went missing. Children reported being stalked by a terrifying grinning animal. Families slept with cabin doors barred and axes and guns at their bedsides. Tales of things that go bump in the night are part of the folklore of the wilderness, told and retold around countless campfires down through the ages. Most are easily dismissed by skeptics. But what happened at Traverspine a hundred years ago was different. The eye-witness accounts were detailed, and those who reported them included no less than three medical doctors and a wildlife biologist. Something really did emerge from the wilderness to haunt the little settlement of Traverspine. Adam Shoalts, decorated modern-day explorer and an expert on wilderness folklore, picks up the trail from a century ago and sets off into the Labrador wild to investigate the tale. It is a spine-tingling adventure, straight from a land steeped in legends and lore, where Vikings wandered a thousand years ago and wolves and bears still roam free. In delving into the dark corners of Canada's wild, The Whisper on the Night Wind combines folklore, history, and adventure into a fascinating saga of exploration.


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NATIONAL BESTSELLER Spellbinding adventure from Canada's most beloved modern-day explorer. Traverspine is not a place you will find on most maps. A century ago, it stood near the foothills of the remote Mealy Mountains in central Labrador. Today it is an abandoned ghost town, almost all trace of it swallowed up by dark spruce woods that cloak millions of acres. In the early NATIONAL BESTSELLER Spellbinding adventure from Canada's most beloved modern-day explorer. Traverspine is not a place you will find on most maps. A century ago, it stood near the foothills of the remote Mealy Mountains in central Labrador. Today it is an abandoned ghost town, almost all trace of it swallowed up by dark spruce woods that cloak millions of acres. In the early 1900s, this isolated little settlement was the scene of an extraordinary haunting by large creatures none could identify. Strange tracks were found in the woods. Unearthly cries were heard in the night. Sled dogs went missing. Children reported being stalked by a terrifying grinning animal. Families slept with cabin doors barred and axes and guns at their bedsides. Tales of things that go bump in the night are part of the folklore of the wilderness, told and retold around countless campfires down through the ages. Most are easily dismissed by skeptics. But what happened at Traverspine a hundred years ago was different. The eye-witness accounts were detailed, and those who reported them included no less than three medical doctors and a wildlife biologist. Something really did emerge from the wilderness to haunt the little settlement of Traverspine. Adam Shoalts, decorated modern-day explorer and an expert on wilderness folklore, picks up the trail from a century ago and sets off into the Labrador wild to investigate the tale. It is a spine-tingling adventure, straight from a land steeped in legends and lore, where Vikings wandered a thousand years ago and wolves and bears still roam free. In delving into the dark corners of Canada's wild, The Whisper on the Night Wind combines folklore, history, and adventure into a fascinating saga of exploration.

30 review for The Whisper on the Night Wind: The True History of a Wilderness Legend

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Walsh

    4.5 stars. I wish to thank NetGalley and Penguin Random House Canada for this entertaining, gripping, true wilderness adventure. It should interest anyone interested in backwoods hiking, wilderness exploration, or involve the armchair reader in exciting, arduous journeys, the history of remote Canadian settlements, and appeal to those fascinated by cryptozoology and folklore. Adam Shoalts is considered the greatest of modern-day Canadian explorers for observing our remote northern forests and ri 4.5 stars. I wish to thank NetGalley and Penguin Random House Canada for this entertaining, gripping, true wilderness adventure. It should interest anyone interested in backwoods hiking, wilderness exploration, or involve the armchair reader in exciting, arduous journeys, the history of remote Canadian settlements, and appeal to those fascinated by cryptozoology and folklore. Adam Shoalts is considered the greatest of modern-day Canadian explorers for observing our remote northern forests and rivers. He is also a naturalist, historian, archaeologist, sharing his outdoor adventures with the reader through his well-written, compelling, informative, and witty accounts. He evokes an atmospheric and vivid sense of place. One feels they are hiking and canoeing beside him without the flies, biting insects, chills, dampness, dangerous cliffs, treacherous river currents, and marshy ground. He sets out on this exciting journey (or ordeal to some) with a friend from schooldays who turns out to be an exceptional travel companion. Their destination is the long-deserted settlement of Traverspene, now a ghost town swallowed by the forest. It was situated at the foothills of the remote Mealy Mountains in the wilds of Labrador. In the early 1900s, the isolated settlement was said to be haunted by large unidentified creatures. Their eerie cries at night frightened the inhabitants, followed their children, and drove off their working dogs. People slept uneasily with the doors barred and guns and axes at the ready. Three medical doctors and a wildlife biologist were among those interviewing the frightened settlers, reporting statements of witnesses and observing the creature's footprints but came to no firm conclusion as to what this monster could be. Because of the strenuous, exhausting journey ahead, they brought only a canoe, a minimum of survival gear, and a night camera. Shoalts also brings along printouts about the early days in the area and copies of accounts and speculation of what sort of creature was frightening the inhabitants. Shoalts studied these accounts in his tent and speculated whether the unknown creature actually existed deep in the forests. He also discusses how stories about cryptids (creatures yet undiscovered and unproven) came to be and developed over the years ( the yeti, Sasquatch, Loch Ness monster, bunyip). He does not dismiss some of the stories and mentions previously unknown mammals and reptiles that have been discovered very recently. He also looks into the origins of longtime folklore legends such as werewolves and the windigo and how these stories became more elaborate and changed over the centuries. It is little wonder that with these discussions, the men became overalert to eerie sounds of the wind rustling in the trees, echos from the churning river, and known animals wandering near their tents at night. They do come up with a reasonable and believable hypothesis for what was lurking about Traverspene and scaring people a century before. I had not read previous books by Adam Shoalts based on his previous explorations, but I am now anxious to add these to my reading list. He impresses one with the importance of leaving large stretches of wilderness undeveloped and in their natural state

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Forsyth

    I think Shoalts is on to a winning formula here. I wrote about how his last book, BEYOND THE TREES, could only inspire me to admiration, and I think a good part of that was that a travel narrative (as impressive as that one was) gets old very quickly for me. Here, he’s layered a few additional elements to that narrative that keep the book moving between three or four different levels so that you’re never trapped in an endless portage. The first and most significant added layer is the history pie I think Shoalts is on to a winning formula here. I wrote about how his last book, BEYOND THE TREES, could only inspire me to admiration, and I think a good part of that was that a travel narrative (as impressive as that one was) gets old very quickly for me. Here, he’s layered a few additional elements to that narrative that keep the book moving between three or four different levels so that you’re never trapped in an endless portage. The first and most significant added layer is the history piece, and it’s by far the most winning piece of this book for me. If Shoalts wants to make a career out of investigating strange local spook stories, I’m entirely on board. He’s never felt more like a real-life Indiana Jones to me as when he’s camped out in a moonlit forest, poring over photocopies of old trapper journals and maps, trying to ascertain the answers to what the strange creature or Traverspine was. I absolutely adored it, and the scenes of him finding the old settlement come alive in a really thrilling way. The second added piece is travelling with his friend Zach, which allows for banter and a relationship piece that brings the insane stuff they’re doing to a more human level. Thirdly, there’s a wry sense of humour that comes out more in this book, which also helps relieve some of the tension of the adventure. If you read BEYOND THE TREES and were unsure if you could handle another book like that, I’m here to heartily recommend THE WHISPER ON THE NIGHT WIND - I want dozens of books like this from Mr. Shoalts, and I can’t wait for his next one!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel Rich

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The geography was the only believable part. Tortuously fabricated dialogue, absurd placement of a revelation about the mystery, and what is, at it's core, a story of a guy's canoe trip. I am not certain the sidekick Zack actually exists, and isn't just a conversational mirror. And the mystery? I'm going to spoil it right here. I wouldn't, but the quality of the book demands I save others the strain of surviving to the end. Wolverines, and moose that wandered into an area they didn't traditionally o The geography was the only believable part. Tortuously fabricated dialogue, absurd placement of a revelation about the mystery, and what is, at it's core, a story of a guy's canoe trip. I am not certain the sidekick Zack actually exists, and isn't just a conversational mirror. And the mystery? I'm going to spoil it right here. I wouldn't, but the quality of the book demands I save others the strain of surviving to the end. Wolverines, and moose that wandered into an area they didn't traditionally occupy. Two critters, mixed up sightings.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    As a fellow Canadian, I am enamoured by the immensity of our forests and millions of lakes but have never been to Labrador. Adventurer and author Adam Shoalts read and heard about fascinating legends and folklore surrounding haunting sounds, unidentifiable creatures and unusual tracks in the Mealy Mountain forests going back hundreds of years. Some of the most detailed eyewitness accounts were recorded in the early 1900s. But in his view what set this apart from Sasquatch sightings, for example, As a fellow Canadian, I am enamoured by the immensity of our forests and millions of lakes but have never been to Labrador. Adventurer and author Adam Shoalts read and heard about fascinating legends and folklore surrounding haunting sounds, unidentifiable creatures and unusual tracks in the Mealy Mountain forests going back hundreds of years. Some of the most detailed eyewitness accounts were recorded in the early 1900s. But in his view what set this apart from Sasquatch sightings, for example, was the credibility of these accounts. As it was September with winter on the horizon, Shoalts had little time to plan a trip to explore the possibilities. He contacted an old acquaintance and adventurer Zach and off they went to seek out creatures some legends called werewolves, others Carcajou and windigos. Were they animals which existed or something undiscovered? The latter is possible in vast forests which are explored very little. The little-known Traverstine area was the goal. Adam took printouts of accounts of haunting sounds, unidentifiable creatures and unusual tracks along with his small canoe and survival gear. He and Zach tented on rugged and difficult terrain and had to sometimes scale cliffs for fresh water. Adam describes seeing whisky jacks, bear tracks, spongy sphagnum moss, pintails and eating lingonberries and cowberries. But what got me in particular...aside from nature which I love...are the descriptions of the eerie night sounds after Zach and the author disappeared into their tents for the night and Adam read his printouts. When I used to wilderness tent every screech and branch scratch and leaf dropping had me on high alert so I can relate to a point. But I wasn't searching for monsters! The dark atmosphere gave me goosebumps. The author is a great storyteller...he kept me riveted and on edge. And that ending! If you have an adventurous spirit or wish you did, this book is for you. It is spine tingling, in a good way, and mesmerizing. I hung onto every word, anxious to read about what happened next. And the thing is, this adventure is real. The quotes at the beginning of the chapters are so apt and add to the atmosphere. My sincere thank you to Penguin Random House Canada and NetGalley for the privilege of reading this wonderful, wonderful book! It truly ignites wanderlust.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Doherty

    I usually don't like to read 'scary' stories like this but this book was so good! Adam Shoalts is a fantastic story teller and I loved joining him on this eerie adventure! It reads like I'm sitting around a campfire listening to his stories! I usually don't like to read 'scary' stories like this but this book was so good! Adam Shoalts is a fantastic story teller and I loved joining him on this eerie adventure! It reads like I'm sitting around a campfire listening to his stories!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Chadsey

    Descriptive, visual, interesting, *~[mYstEr!oUs)!*~

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher Penguin Random House Canada for an advanced copy of this new outdoor adventure book. Adam Shoalts, historian, archeologist, explorer and outdoors writer, has in his latest book, The Whisper on the Night Wind: The True History of a Wilderness Legend written a fascinating and unsettling account of his travels through the forests of Labrador in Canada. Seeking to find answers to a mystery that he read about from over one hundred years ago. In the early 1900's My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher Penguin Random House Canada for an advanced copy of this new outdoor adventure book. Adam Shoalts, historian, archeologist, explorer and outdoors writer, has in his latest book, The Whisper on the Night Wind: The True History of a Wilderness Legend written a fascinating and unsettling account of his travels through the forests of Labrador in Canada. Seeking to find answers to a mystery that he read about from over one hundred years ago. In the early 1900's strange tracks, odd noises and numerous weird sightings of unknown creatures, along with missing sled dogs scared the members of this isolated community, causing doors to be bolted at night, with axes and rifles at the ready to protect them from danger. Mr. Shoalts and a high school acquaintance enter the woods to see what they can discover. The story is a mix of travel log, folklore and history of the area, with nature and animal discussions and a little cryptozoology mixed in. The writing is crisp and interesting going from simple canoe ride to creature accounts from the past and back to birdwatching without losing the reader or dragging any of the narrative down. The trip is cold and wet and while the men find themselves tested physically, they are also mentally tested with as odd things seem to happen, strange tracks appear in their camp and noises make a good night sleep very difficult. Together the two men come to a very strong hypotheses to what might have happened, to have that hypotheses tested at the very end. A very fun and different outdoor tale, with a good mix of spookiness and travel mixed together. I've not read other books by Mr. Shoalts, and I will have to amend that. This was a really well written book that will please outdoors people, travel readers and people who love a little mystery in their lives.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    4.5 stars rounded up This book is haunting, informative, and triggers one’s adrenaline which is part memoir, geographical and topographical information, and layered with folklore of mystical (and real) creatures. Shoalts details out his adventuring into the Mealy Mountains in Labrador, Canada to research the legends of a mysterious hauntings of a large unidentified creature in the early 1900s. Throughout the story of his traversing the Mealy Mountains, Shoalts presents tales and information on we 4.5 stars rounded up This book is haunting, informative, and triggers one’s adrenaline which is part memoir, geographical and topographical information, and layered with folklore of mystical (and real) creatures. Shoalts details out his adventuring into the Mealy Mountains in Labrador, Canada to research the legends of a mysterious hauntings of a large unidentified creature in the early 1900s. Throughout the story of his traversing the Mealy Mountains, Shoalts presents tales and information on wendigos, wolverines, bears, moose, and other wildlife. If you are one who enjoys the outdoors, adventuring, and things that go bump in the night, I recommend this book. I listened to the audiobook which was narrated by the author. Listening to the book made me feel like I was sitting around a campfire hearing a creepy story. Thank you Libro.fm and Penguin Canada for the ALC of this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Borys

    I really enjoy books about real life mysteries or unknown places and this book was no exception. The fact it was about Labrador, which is probably the least well known part of Canada, was a bonus. The author has an easy way of writing, but is able to capture the mystery and bleakness of the land, as well as the eeriness of thinking a monster lurks just within the tree line. :) His choice of traveling companion was great too, as their sarcastic dry humour worked well together. While part of me wa I really enjoy books about real life mysteries or unknown places and this book was no exception. The fact it was about Labrador, which is probably the least well known part of Canada, was a bonus. The author has an easy way of writing, but is able to capture the mystery and bleakness of the land, as well as the eeriness of thinking a monster lurks just within the tree line. :) His choice of traveling companion was great too, as their sarcastic dry humour worked well together. While part of me was kind of hoping they wouldn't solve the mystery of the Traverspine monster, the journey to get there, both physically and research-wise, was great fun, especially as I didn't have to deal with the bugs, trees, river currents, and mountains myself.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Marie Walters

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book wasn’t as compelling as I was hoping. I found it boring in parts and very repetitive. Shoalts used the same few paragraph-length retellings of the Traverspine beast over and over. I didn’t find the adventure part very exciting, either. Not much happened. I was also a bit baffled by how quickly he decided to go on this gruelling journey and that he hoped to check out caves for a beast but didn’t even bring rope. I guess I didn’t really understand why he went there, especially before fin This book wasn’t as compelling as I was hoping. I found it boring in parts and very repetitive. Shoalts used the same few paragraph-length retellings of the Traverspine beast over and over. I didn’t find the adventure part very exciting, either. Not much happened. I was also a bit baffled by how quickly he decided to go on this gruelling journey and that he hoped to check out caves for a beast but didn’t even bring rope. I guess I didn’t really understand why he went there, especially before finishing his research. Every conclusion he made about the beast seemed to be something he could have made back home from re-reading those accounts.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I've read Adam's other 3 books and this one didn't disappoint! Excellent story teller, this one was a bit of a mythical mystery as well. Thoroughly enjoyed it. I've read Adam's other 3 books and this one didn't disappoint! Excellent story teller, this one was a bit of a mythical mystery as well. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emma Giles (byo.book)

    What the heck?! This was spooky. Adam's books never disappoint. What the heck?! This was spooky. Adam's books never disappoint.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jason Pushee

    Whisper on the Night Wind is standard Shoalts explorer travelogue but has the additional suspense of the mystery creature hidden in wilds of Labrador. Shoalts does an decent, though at times repetitive, job of telling the history of this unknown beast that has haunted the people in the far North stretches of the Appalachian Mountains over the past couple centuries. He always does a great job of bringing the reader on the hike with him as he plods up river or through some grueling circumstance co Whisper on the Night Wind is standard Shoalts explorer travelogue but has the additional suspense of the mystery creature hidden in wilds of Labrador. Shoalts does an decent, though at times repetitive, job of telling the history of this unknown beast that has haunted the people in the far North stretches of the Appalachian Mountains over the past couple centuries. He always does a great job of bringing the reader on the hike with him as he plods up river or through some grueling circumstance constantly posed to him by nature in the middle of no where, but having this added narrative adds some thrill. It was interesting getting a different take in his writing and though you get a decent idea of Shoalts' strength as a researcher in all his books, this time it really shows through. I always look forward to Shoalts and appreciated this different spin from an important Canadian author and adventurer.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book was so much more than just a recollection of a man's trek through the wilderness. I could not put it down. Shoalts does an amazing job combing scientific evidence with local lore/superstitions in a storytelling format. Not only was I pulled in right away to the mystery surrounding the ghost town of Traverspine and the mysterious creature that terrorized the town's residents but also Shaolts journey through rivers and up the mountains really captivated me and woke up my inner explorer. This book was so much more than just a recollection of a man's trek through the wilderness. I could not put it down. Shoalts does an amazing job combing scientific evidence with local lore/superstitions in a storytelling format. Not only was I pulled in right away to the mystery surrounding the ghost town of Traverspine and the mysterious creature that terrorized the town's residents but also Shaolts journey through rivers and up the mountains really captivated me and woke up my inner explorer. And the reader can tell Shoalts really knows his stuff. He is an expert on surviving the wilderness and his a trustworthy narrative. I felt like I was really in the tent with him late at night as all kinds of noises and strange happenings disturb his sleep. If you are in need of an great adventures into the wilderness of Canada without leaving your couch, I would highly suggest picking this one up. I'm already adding more of Shoalts's work to my TBR.

  15. 5 out of 5

    William

    I first noticed this book on the shelves at Coles a few weeks before Christmas and was able to convince one of my brothers to get it for me as a gift if they were stuck. Christmas Day arrives, and voila, “Whisper on the Night Wind” is under my tree. There was just something alluring about the description on the insert of this book that hooked me from that first moment: a legendary creature, a deserted ghost town, the woods of Labrador. All of it! Adam Shoalts does a great job of entertaining his I first noticed this book on the shelves at Coles a few weeks before Christmas and was able to convince one of my brothers to get it for me as a gift if they were stuck. Christmas Day arrives, and voila, “Whisper on the Night Wind” is under my tree. There was just something alluring about the description on the insert of this book that hooked me from that first moment: a legendary creature, a deserted ghost town, the woods of Labrador. All of it! Adam Shoalts does a great job of entertaining his audience with a thoughtful explanation of what kind of monster scared the settlers of Traverspine in the early 1900s and even offers up some logical and believable explanations as to what really happened by the end of the book. In between it all, he accurately portrays the wilderness and its harsh personality while also divulging into a number of similar accounts of strange creatures from as far away as France and stretching back in time to the Ice Age and the megafauna that lived back then. There are times where the book is a bit repetitive, but all in all I enjoyed the style and subject matter too much to complain.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul Sutter

    No one could ever say that Adam Shoalts lets life pass him by. He knows what he wants and will never let moss grow under his backside. He is one of Canada’s most noted explorers and adventurers, forging into regions and doing things most Canadians would never dream of doing. Going on excavations for archeological digs, and checking out endangered species, wherever they may be, is a quest that drives Shoalts. That is why his latest book THE WHISPER ON THE NIGHT WIND is typical Shoalts, fascinatin No one could ever say that Adam Shoalts lets life pass him by. He knows what he wants and will never let moss grow under his backside. He is one of Canada’s most noted explorers and adventurers, forging into regions and doing things most Canadians would never dream of doing. Going on excavations for archeological digs, and checking out endangered species, wherever they may be, is a quest that drives Shoalts. That is why his latest book THE WHISPER ON THE NIGHT WIND is typical Shoalts, fascinating and fun to read. He decided to take a journey to Labrador, specifically the Melville Lake area, heading to a ghost town that used to be Traverspine. He went there in search of what some might consider an urban myth, a legendary creature that had been reportedly seen by several generations. But the question is, what was it, and did it truly exist? He headed to Labrador with an old friend Zach, and they wanted to learn once and for all if this phantom in the night was real. It is reminiscent of the Bigfoot myth and other such creatures who inhabit woods. With their canoe and hiking gear, they headed into the dense area and give us a bird’s eye view of their experiences. Adam talks about the sounds in the night and the foreboding danger that was potentially imminent. Those who had seen the creature in the past, said it had a white mane and was maybe as tall as seven feet. It sometimes got down on all fours and rambled into the forest area. So much speculation surrounded it, as the two men were unsure of what they would find but were definitely not about to let fear keep them at bay. What they found was not totally expected, though it was not some sub-human creature from a Grade B horror film. It may not be what readers expected, but the book still offers a few chills and what ifs about many other legends in different areas of this country. Undoubtedly Shoalts and friends will definitely not turn a blind eye to further adventures. We cannot wait to read about them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Inessa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Thank god this was such a short novel. One that could also be easily skimmed. Read this in just two sittings - not out of excitement or curiosity, rather out of hopes to complete it quickly. Problems: The dialogue: while I’m normally one that CRAVES dialogue, I was happy each chapter only had a few sentences. The dialogue was between Adam the main explorer and Zach, his big, fighting, triathlete acquaintance. The two have nothing in common and Zach reminded me of a big oaf. He gets knocked in the Thank god this was such a short novel. One that could also be easily skimmed. Read this in just two sittings - not out of excitement or curiosity, rather out of hopes to complete it quickly. Problems: The dialogue: while I’m normally one that CRAVES dialogue, I was happy each chapter only had a few sentences. The dialogue was between Adam the main explorer and Zach, his big, fighting, triathlete acquaintance. The two have nothing in common and Zach reminded me of a big oaf. He gets knocked in the head for money so this could lend a hand to the awful dialogue - paired with Adam who seems to prefer being alone in the wild than speaking with humans. Just awful. The duo: I find it hard to believe that Zach would join someone he didn’t speak to in high school… who has now reached out decades later… for him to abandon his pregnant wife and join him on a ghost,monster expedition 33 hours from home. Just a super odd dynamic here. The mystery: what seemed like a new legend got quickly debunked when Adam realizes these accounts of the monster happened long enough ago that moose and wolverines weren’t common or known. Adam quickly nods in agreement and then there we go, time to pack up! My question is why did it take the trek for Adam to realize this? If he has already travelled across Canada he must be familiar with the local animals. The repetition : while Adam was doing his research he monotonously read over the “sightings” which somehow were dispersed from the beginning chapters through the end of the novel. I didn’t care to read the italicized passages so many times over. 🌟 rating.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Another awesome book from Adam Shoalts! Audio 😍 That ending will be with me for a long while….

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Vinson

    Thank you to the author and to Penguin Random House for a finished copy of The Whisper on the Night Wind. This is my first book from Adam Shoalts, historian, archaeologist, geographer, and Westaway Explorer-in-Residence at the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, but I can assure you, it won’t be my last! In his book, The Whisper on the Night Wind, Shoalts, along with a friend from his school days, sets out to investigate a 100 year old mystery at Traverspine—now a ghost town at the foothills of Thank you to the author and to Penguin Random House for a finished copy of The Whisper on the Night Wind. This is my first book from Adam Shoalts, historian, archaeologist, geographer, and Westaway Explorer-in-Residence at the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, but I can assure you, it won’t be my last! In his book, The Whisper on the Night Wind, Shoalts, along with a friend from his school days, sets out to investigate a 100 year old mystery at Traverspine—now a ghost town at the foothills of the Mealy Mountains in Labrador, but what once was a small settlement of fur traders and their families—and to explore a tale of local lore of large, unidentified creatures that haunted Traverspine a century ago. This nonfiction book reads like an exciting adventure novel! At no point in my reading was I ever bored or disinterested. When the author wasn’t describing the ardors of the journey, he was sharing bits of history or more of the written accounts of eyewitnesses of the incidents that took place in Traverspine. His storytelling is superb, and infused with a bit of humor that made me chuckle several times while reading passages like this one. “Perhaps because the sky was overcast, we couldn’t see into the depths of the pond to determine how deep it was, which lent it an air of mystery—a kind of magic pool in these spell-bound mountains. Maybe, with any luck, drinking its waters might give us some enlightenment, or at the very least prevent dehydration, which was nearly as well.” Through his riveting account, I felt like I was along for the journey, canoeing the rapids of mountain rivers, traversing and clawing my way through dense forest thickets, fighting off the black flies and mosquitoes, pitching a tent in the woods and hoping that the noises outside the tent in the middle of the night indicated nothing worse than a bear prowling about, and scaling the Mealy Mountains in search of hidden caves that might house the Traverspine beasts, all while trying not to be blown off the mountain by the tremendous wind speeds at the summit. If adventures in the wild are your thing, or even if you’re more of an armchair adventurer, don’t hesitate to pick up Adam Shoalt’s latest book, The Whisper on the Night Wind, and prepare to be captivated!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Huguette Larochelle

    Love the book. Adam bring the readers in a adventure. I have all 4 or his books never disappointed. And i have see him 2 time in person . great job. The best stories tellers .

  21. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Neesam

    Author Adam Shoalts is a well-known Canadian explorer, academic, and, as he proves here, a consummate storyteller. In Whisper of the Night Wind, Shoalts sets off for a now-abandoned settlement to determine the possible veracity of historical stories about a large, vicious creature terrorizing a community in the early 1900s. Weaving anecdotes about traveling to and exploring an extremely isolated part of Canada with the original accounts of eye-witnesses, including trappers, doctors, and a wildli Author Adam Shoalts is a well-known Canadian explorer, academic, and, as he proves here, a consummate storyteller. In Whisper of the Night Wind, Shoalts sets off for a now-abandoned settlement to determine the possible veracity of historical stories about a large, vicious creature terrorizing a community in the early 1900s. Weaving anecdotes about traveling to and exploring an extremely isolated part of Canada with the original accounts of eye-witnesses, including trappers, doctors, and a wildlife biologist, Shoalts finally comes up with a viable explanation (no spoilers here). Shoalts has a good sense of humour about his travel experiences and at the same time his descriptions of what it’s like to live in a location as wild and remote as Labrador propel the narrative. Whisper of the Night Wind is a good story told well. Recommended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    The author and a companion journey to Labrador in search of a (possibly) mythic creature in this excellent book. Their canoe voyages and hikes through muskeg and mountains are fascinating, but even more interesting are the many historical excerpts peppered throughout the book. History, exploration, and folklore all come together in this book, and it's a truly enjoyable read about another of Adam Shoalts's explorations of remote parts of Canada. Really good. Looking forward to his next book. The author and a companion journey to Labrador in search of a (possibly) mythic creature in this excellent book. Their canoe voyages and hikes through muskeg and mountains are fascinating, but even more interesting are the many historical excerpts peppered throughout the book. History, exploration, and folklore all come together in this book, and it's a truly enjoyable read about another of Adam Shoalts's explorations of remote parts of Canada. Really good. Looking forward to his next book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Gorman

    Good Book Good book. Kept my interest, however I liked Beyond the Trees better. I've read three of his books and enjoyed them all. Good Book Good book. Kept my interest, however I liked Beyond the Trees better. I've read three of his books and enjoyed them all.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vontel

    Entertaining writing about an extreme wilderness experience to the Mealy Mountains of central Labrador, exploring both the terrain, and the possible truth behind the mythology of a dangerous strange beast that existed in such an isolated area, based on recorded stories from people who lived or travelled there. He also discussed them in the context of the realities from long ago in rural areas, in many other parts of the world where wolves were rampant killers of isolated people, and contributed Entertaining writing about an extreme wilderness experience to the Mealy Mountains of central Labrador, exploring both the terrain, and the possible truth behind the mythology of a dangerous strange beast that existed in such an isolated area, based on recorded stories from people who lived or travelled there. He also discussed them in the context of the realities from long ago in rural areas, in many other parts of the world where wolves were rampant killers of isolated people, and contributed to the mythology of dangerous beasts such as werewolves and vampires. Shoalts writes vividly about such a wilderness experience, this time with a companion who was equally capable of such an adventure. It certainly was an exploration that only the most prepared & hardy are ever likely to undertake successfully. Shoalts was able to obtain & bring along photocopies of considerable material, which he was able to use to provide clues both the routes to take & facts to consider & explore. He managed to spin the sometimes spooky & eerie yarn out to book length, when interlaced with the physical challenges of the canoe & hiking trip. I read Shoalts' previous book "Beyond the Trees", and looked forward to reading another.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Hattaway

    Beautifully written.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Letain

    I’ve read all of Adam’s books and enjoyed them all, but this one was my favourite. It does a fantastic job of combining adventure, myth/lore, and historical investigation. I believe it’s his shortest book, but it doesn’t seem to be lacking anything because of it. It’s fast paced, but not rushed, and I really appreciated that. Definitely would recommend!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kyra

    Another fantastic tale told by Adam. Bringing in a sense of mystery to his usual outdoor adventures, we get to go hiking and canoeing through the wilds of Labrador. Beautifully written, you get shivers up your spine and goosebumps on your arms wondering what goes bump in the night... he truly brings Canada's wilds to your bookcase. Loved it. Can't wait to read the next adventure!! Another fantastic tale told by Adam. Bringing in a sense of mystery to his usual outdoor adventures, we get to go hiking and canoeing through the wilds of Labrador. Beautifully written, you get shivers up your spine and goosebumps on your arms wondering what goes bump in the night... he truly brings Canada's wilds to your bookcase. Loved it. Can't wait to read the next adventure!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marie Barr

    3.5 stars This was an amazing adventure into Canada’s history and country. First time I have read a book by this author. Liked his writing style. Will be reading more. This did feel chilling in parts and loved that pictures were included in the book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rob Crisp

    Blending mysterious folklore with a thrilling expedition through one of the worlds most remote places.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nikolas

    Really enjoyed reading this book. Adam Shoalts is the ultimate adventurer and can definitely write as well.

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