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The Postmistress of Paris

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Now a Good Morning America Buzz Book, People Magazine pick, Indie Next Pick, Book of the Month Add On, and USA Today “5 Books Not To Miss”! The New York Times bestselling author of The Last Train to London revisits the dark early days of the German occupation in France in this haunting novel—a love story and a tale of high-stakes danger and incomparable courage—about a youn Now a Good Morning America Buzz Book, People Magazine pick, Indie Next Pick, Book of the Month Add On, and USA Today “5 Books Not To Miss”! The New York Times bestselling author of The Last Train to London revisits the dark early days of the German occupation in France in this haunting novel—a love story and a tale of high-stakes danger and incomparable courage—about a young American heiress who helps artists hunted by the Nazis escape from war-torn Europe. Wealthy, beautiful Naneé was born with a spirit of adventure. For her, learning to fly is freedom. When German tanks roll across the border and into Paris, this woman with an adorable dog and a generous heart joins the resistance. Known as the Postmistress because she delivers information to those in hiding, Naneé uses her charms and skill to house the hunted and deliver them to safety. Photographer Edouard Moss has escaped Germany with his young daughter only to be interned in a French labor camp. His life collides with Nanée’s in this sweeping tale of romance and danger set in a world aflame with personal and political passion. Inspired by the real life Chicago heiress Mary Jayne Gold, who worked with American journalist Varian Fry to smuggle artists and intellectuals out of France, The Postmistress of Paris is the haunting story of an indomitable woman whose strength, bravery, and love is a beacon of hope in a time of terror.


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Now a Good Morning America Buzz Book, People Magazine pick, Indie Next Pick, Book of the Month Add On, and USA Today “5 Books Not To Miss”! The New York Times bestselling author of The Last Train to London revisits the dark early days of the German occupation in France in this haunting novel—a love story and a tale of high-stakes danger and incomparable courage—about a youn Now a Good Morning America Buzz Book, People Magazine pick, Indie Next Pick, Book of the Month Add On, and USA Today “5 Books Not To Miss”! The New York Times bestselling author of The Last Train to London revisits the dark early days of the German occupation in France in this haunting novel—a love story and a tale of high-stakes danger and incomparable courage—about a young American heiress who helps artists hunted by the Nazis escape from war-torn Europe. Wealthy, beautiful Naneé was born with a spirit of adventure. For her, learning to fly is freedom. When German tanks roll across the border and into Paris, this woman with an adorable dog and a generous heart joins the resistance. Known as the Postmistress because she delivers information to those in hiding, Naneé uses her charms and skill to house the hunted and deliver them to safety. Photographer Edouard Moss has escaped Germany with his young daughter only to be interned in a French labor camp. His life collides with Nanée’s in this sweeping tale of romance and danger set in a world aflame with personal and political passion. Inspired by the real life Chicago heiress Mary Jayne Gold, who worked with American journalist Varian Fry to smuggle artists and intellectuals out of France, The Postmistress of Paris is the haunting story of an indomitable woman whose strength, bravery, and love is a beacon of hope in a time of terror.

30 review for The Postmistress of Paris

  1. 5 out of 5

    DeAnn

    4 inspired by real life stars These historical fiction books are some of my favorites, inspired by a real person, and infused with rich history and setting. This time we have Nanee, an American who has been living in Paris for a decade and then WWII breaks out. She’s wealthy and beautiful and her US passport makes it easier for her navigate the streets as a “postmistress” delivering packages and messages to those hiding from the Germans. There are quite a few Surrealist artists featured in this on 4 inspired by real life stars These historical fiction books are some of my favorites, inspired by a real person, and infused with rich history and setting. This time we have Nanee, an American who has been living in Paris for a decade and then WWII breaks out. She’s wealthy and beautiful and her US passport makes it easier for her navigate the streets as a “postmistress” delivering packages and messages to those hiding from the Germans. There are quite a few Surrealist artists featured in this one along with photographer Edouard Moss. Together with another American, Varian Fry, many of those in hiding were spirited away to other countries. Quite a bit of the book takes place in Marseilles, and I liked that setting for this one. There’s danger and romance and an adorable little girl in this story. I loved this one based on Mary Jayne Gold, and it seems she is a strong woman to admire! She used her personal wealth for the cause and put her life in danger multiple times. Recommended for fans of WWII historical fiction! Thank you to Harper and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Meg Clayton

    The Postmistress of Paris is officially out a week from today!!!! Here's some of the lovely stuff happening so far, with still a wonderful surprise behind curtain #8 not to be opened until December 1: • Indie Next Pick – recommended by booksellers across the US • Publishers Weekly Notable Book for Fall/Winter 2021 • PublishersLunch Notable New Release for November 2021 • Bookbub Best Historical Fiction to Read this Fall • Publishers Weekly Tip Sheet: What to Read Next • #2 on the Loanstars list — the The Postmistress of Paris is officially out a week from today!!!! Here's some of the lovely stuff happening so far, with still a wonderful surprise behind curtain #8 not to be opened until December 1: • Indie Next Pick – recommended by booksellers across the US • Publishers Weekly Notable Book for Fall/Winter 2021 • PublishersLunch Notable New Release for November 2021 • Bookbub Best Historical Fiction to Read this Fall • Publishers Weekly Tip Sheet: What to Read Next • #2 on the Loanstars list — the most anticipated books as voted by library staff across Canada “Gripping … an evocative love story layered with heroism and intrigue — the film ‘Casablanca’ if Rick had an artsy bent … powerful.” – The San Francisco Chronicle “⭐️ Lyrical, thought-provoking prose… This sterling portrait of a complex woman stands head and shoulders above most contemporary WWII fiction.” – Publishers Weekly, in a starred review “⭐️ A true gem … a testament to the power of good.” – Library Journal, in a starred review So much gratitude to everyone already reading and giving it such lovely reviews here. I can't wait to share it with the rest of you! Lots of VIRTUAL events for this one, so please join me from anywhere. Schedule at https://www.megwaiteclayton.com/events/ More about The Postmistress of Paris: The New York Times bestselling author of The Last Train to London revisits the dark early days of the German occupation in France in this haunting novel—a love story and a tale of high-stakes danger and incomparable courage—about a young American heiress who helps artists hunted by the Nazis escape from war-torn Europe. Wealthy, beautiful Naneé was born with a spirit of adventure. For her, learning to fly is freedom. When German tanks roll across the border and into Paris, this woman with an adorable dog and a generous heart joins the resistance. Known as the Postmistress because she delivers information to those in hiding, Naneé uses her charms and skill to house the hunted and deliver them to safety. Photographer Edouard Moss has escaped Germany with his young daughter only to be interned in a French labor camp. His life collides with Nanée’s in this sweeping tale of romance and danger set in a world aflame with personal and political passion. Inspired by the real life Chicago heiress Mary Jayne Gold, who worked with American journalist Varian Fry to smuggle artists and intellectuals out of France, The Postmistress of Paris is the haunting story of an indomitable woman whose strength, bravery, and love is a beacon of hope in a time of terror.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Morgan (not accepting new friends request at the m

    My reason for reading this book: According to the author the story is “Inspired by the real life Chicago heiress Mary Jayne Gold, who worked with American journalist Varian Fry to smuggle artists and intellectuals out of France…” However, the book in no way displays the vital role of the hero Varian Fry or the orginazation he created. Fry’s name does not even appear until page 79. And having an irritating little dog become one of the characters is too much nonsense for the reader to take this se My reason for reading this book: According to the author the story is “Inspired by the real life Chicago heiress Mary Jayne Gold, who worked with American journalist Varian Fry to smuggle artists and intellectuals out of France…” However, the book in no way displays the vital role of the hero Varian Fry or the orginazation he created. Fry’s name does not even appear until page 79. And having an irritating little dog become one of the characters is too much nonsense for the reader to take this seriously. I can see where anyone who does not know anything about Varian Fry would find this book appealing. It is clear that the author has no understanding of the very serious and dangerous work carried out by Varian Fry and his orginazion. From my point of view it is demeaning to Varian Fry and his organization who got over 1,500 people out of France before he was arrested. The book is slow and filled with rubbish and fluff having nothing whatsoever to do with the suggested plot of the story and almost nothing to do with what Fry accomplished. It does not even do justice to the real Mary Jayne Gold! Since Varian Fry is a bona fide hero who did remarkable things I urge readers to read “Surrender on Demand” by Varian Fry. Preface by Warren Christopher. A list of those aided by Fry and his organization can be found on Google. Varian Fry died alone in Connecticut in September 1967, up to which time he had not yet received one word of recognition for his work. He was 59 years old. This book has done nothing to honor this hero and the organization he created out of thin air. Updated **In 1980 Mary Jayne Gold wrote a book of her own: “Crossroads Marseilles, 1940” which I have not read but will likely not be ‘fiction’.

  4. 4 out of 5

    MicheleReader

    Naneé Gold is an American socialite living in Paris among its artists and intellectuals. As the Germans invade France, she could have returned to the U.S. to safety and a life of parties. Instead, she devotes herself to the French Resistance working with journalist Varian Fry, who was sent by the American Emergency Rescue Committee to help members of the art community escape Nazi persecution. She becomes a courier, secretly delivering messages across Paris. Naneé uses her wealth to rent a large Naneé Gold is an American socialite living in Paris among its artists and intellectuals. As the Germans invade France, she could have returned to the U.S. to safety and a life of parties. Instead, she devotes herself to the French Resistance working with journalist Varian Fry, who was sent by the American Emergency Rescue Committee to help members of the art community escape Nazi persecution. She becomes a courier, secretly delivering messages across Paris. Naneé uses her wealth to rent a large villa in Marseilles which becomes a refuge for artists and members of the Resistance. She works to rescue Edouard Moss, a Jewish photographer who is imprisoned at Camp de Milles, an internment camp, and hopes to reunite him with his young daughter, who is being hidden. The Postmistress of Paris was inspired by the remarkable, true story of Mary Jayne Gold. The book includes many of the actual people she worked with during WWII including Fry and Daniel Bénédite along with real-life figures from the surrealist art movement Max Ernst and André Breton. Author Meg Waite Clayton presents the danger and terror of the war through the eyes of a small circle of people including one very courageous young woman. Just when I thought I’d read enough books about the French Resistance to last me for a while, I was pleased to read Clayton’s new, well-researched historical novel, which is a moving story with strong, brave characters. And a little romance too. Rated 4.25 stars. Review posted on MicheleReader.com.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Many historical fiction books are based on real people - usually women who have been forgotten over time. Many of these woman were brave beyond words and helped to defeat the Germans in many different ways. This new book by Meg Waite Clayton is based on Mary Jayne Gold, an American heiress whose bravery inspired Naneé, the main character in this book. Naneé was an American heiress who loved Paris and had spent so much time there that she felt she was a Parisian. She's a social butterfly and very Many historical fiction books are based on real people - usually women who have been forgotten over time. Many of these woman were brave beyond words and helped to defeat the Germans in many different ways. This new book by Meg Waite Clayton is based on Mary Jayne Gold, an American heiress whose bravery inspired Naneé, the main character in this book. Naneé was an American heiress who loved Paris and had spent so much time there that she felt she was a Parisian. She's a social butterfly and very interested in the arts - painting, writing, etc. She meets Edouard at a party. He has escaped Germany and is trying to keep he and his daughter, Luki, safe in France even though the Vichy government is rounding up Jewish people and sending them to camps. She starts working with the Resistance to help artists and painters get out of the country. One part of the book that was filled with tension happened when Luki was sent to Paris with friends and her father was supposed to follow her the next day but the police took him to jail for a month. After he was released, he was unable to find his beloved daughter and he didn't know if she was safe. Naneé started working with the Resistance to send messages to people who were in hiding and to get the proper paperwork so they could get out Paris to safety in America. Her bravery helped many people escape but it put her in danger. Will she be able to get out of France when the Gestapo is looking for her? This is another fantastic book based on real people who put their lives at risk to help people escape from the danger in World War II. If you enjoy historical fiction from this time period or enjoy books about brave women who make a different in the lives of others or just want to read an exciting book- you don't want to miss this one. Once again this author gives her readers a well written and well researched story with characters that will be difficult to forget. Thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book to read and review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I read a lot, two to three books a week. I have read many of the novels relating to work by varying resistance groups in Europe during World War II. Honestly, I thought I was over saturated, but Good reads was kind enough to send me a copy of The Postmistress of Paris, so I felt like I should read it. Oh, my GOSH. Oh, my gosh, this is a fabulous read. It is honestly one of the best books I have read all year. It is from a different point of view, focusing on getting Jewish artists out of Nazi oc I read a lot, two to three books a week. I have read many of the novels relating to work by varying resistance groups in Europe during World War II. Honestly, I thought I was over saturated, but Good reads was kind enough to send me a copy of The Postmistress of Paris, so I felt like I should read it. Oh, my GOSH. Oh, my gosh, this is a fabulous read. It is honestly one of the best books I have read all year. It is from a different point of view, focusing on getting Jewish artists out of Nazi occupied areas, but it is also incredibly suspenseful. You know that feeling when you can't read anymore, because you are afraid of what might happen, yet you can't put the book down? Well, that is this book. It is also a very beautifully written story of the generosity and bravery and love that can come out of a horrible situation. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. I promise you will be so glad that you didn't let this one slip past you.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Lyrical writing. Equal turns touching & riveting. A story of courageous people inspired by their real-life counterparts. My favorite part--the beautiful father/daughter relationship. So glad I chose this as my audiobook for commuting back & forth to school this week!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Fictional history at its best .. Meg Waite Clayton’s Postmistress of Paris took me, the reader, on an incredible world wide journey. This beautiful novel is set in the dark early days of the German occupation of France .. what an adventurous love story! I fell in love with the precious characters & can highly recommend, especially to book review clubs with so many discussion themes. Brava!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Piepie

    I found this book to be pretty dry -- I expected it to be more than what it originally turned out being. The novel begins with Nanee and her dog flying an airplane... I would have liked more scenes along those lines, I wanted more "stuff" about airplanes. I also would have liked to read more about what the "Postmistress" actually delivered; I wanted more about disguises / spies / secret messages / etc. There is a thread running throughout of starcrossed lovers and this WWII story ends with hope a I found this book to be pretty dry -- I expected it to be more than what it originally turned out being. The novel begins with Nanee and her dog flying an airplane... I would have liked more scenes along those lines, I wanted more "stuff" about airplanes. I also would have liked to read more about what the "Postmistress" actually delivered; I wanted more about disguises / spies / secret messages / etc. There is a thread running throughout of starcrossed lovers and this WWII story ends with hope and the timeless love of a father and his child. There's nothing wrong with this book; maybe I just wasn't in the right mindset for it. Maybe you'll like it better than I did. Thanks, Netgalley, for my arc.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres and I was excited to receive this from a Goodreads giveaway. The character of Nanee was inspired by Mary Jane Gold, an American heiress who risked her life to aid refugees escaping France. Nanee left her privileged life in America to make her home in Paris. There she befriends intellectuals and the Surrealist artists, who push the boundaries of propriety. Their freedoms are now threatened by Hitler's rise to power as their art is considered immoral Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres and I was excited to receive this from a Goodreads giveaway. The character of Nanee was inspired by Mary Jane Gold, an American heiress who risked her life to aid refugees escaping France. Nanee left her privileged life in America to make her home in Paris. There she befriends intellectuals and the Surrealist artists, who push the boundaries of propriety. Their freedoms are now threatened by Hitler's rise to power as their art is considered immoral. They flee Paris to seek safety in the French Free Zone, which then becomes more and more dangerous under the Vichy authorities. Nanee finds her embedded with a group extracting those in danger to find freedom, at great cost to herself. An inspiring novel of courage, love, family and community. I always enjoy when I learn about another facet of WWII history I was unfamiliar with encapsulated in a wonderful story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    theliterateleprechaun

    Author Meg Clayton writes to explore the early days of the German occupation of France and highlights a young American heiress who has come to help artists escape. I loved the adorable dog and a strong, brave protagonist as much as I loved learning about the photographer, Eduard Moss and his cute daughter. I really enjoy a book that inspires me to search out the story behind the novel. In this case, Chicago heiress, Mary Jayne Gold and Varian Fry were the real-life heroes who smuggled artists ou Author Meg Clayton writes to explore the early days of the German occupation of France and highlights a young American heiress who has come to help artists escape. I loved the adorable dog and a strong, brave protagonist as much as I loved learning about the photographer, Eduard Moss and his cute daughter. I really enjoy a book that inspires me to search out the story behind the novel. In this case, Chicago heiress, Mary Jayne Gold and Varian Fry were the real-life heroes who smuggled artists out of France. The sense of adventure, the sweeping romance, and the glamour Nanee brings to her mission hooked me. Clayton has truly honoured this indomitable woman whose bravery was a beacon of hope in wartime.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kate Eminhizer

    This book is deeply thought provoking. While it provides a glimpse of the sacrifices people made for the French Resistance it also seems to focus on coping mechanisms, personal identity, and relationships. Clayton draws the reader in so subtly. Her characters wrap the reader into their fold and one cannot help but feel their sorrows, regrets, determination, courage, and love. Theirs is not a story of defiance, just simply of survival. They wished not just for survival of their person but also su This book is deeply thought provoking. While it provides a glimpse of the sacrifices people made for the French Resistance it also seems to focus on coping mechanisms, personal identity, and relationships. Clayton draws the reader in so subtly. Her characters wrap the reader into their fold and one cannot help but feel their sorrows, regrets, determination, courage, and love. Theirs is not a story of defiance, just simply of survival. They wished not just for survival of their person but also survival of their culture. Clayton superbly uses art as means to reflect the hope and despair of the world. A wonderfully crafted story that provides another view of the French Resistance during WWII. I received a copy of this title via NetGalley.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Meg Waite Clayton is an author that is hit or miss for me. Unfortunately, this book was a miss. Part of this was due to the fact that I recently read THE FLIGHT PORTFOLIO, a book that was about Varian Fry and his crew in Marseilles, trying to rescue artists and get them out of France in WWII. Beyond that, though, I wasn't caught up in the stories or the characters. I was bored and it was too long and didn't keep my interest at all. Meg Waite Clayton is an author that is hit or miss for me. Unfortunately, this book was a miss. Part of this was due to the fact that I recently read THE FLIGHT PORTFOLIO, a book that was about Varian Fry and his crew in Marseilles, trying to rescue artists and get them out of France in WWII. Beyond that, though, I wasn't caught up in the stories or the characters. I was bored and it was too long and didn't keep my interest at all.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    THE POSTMISTRESS OF PARIS Meg Waite Clayton This historical fiction is set in Paris just before and after the occupation or collaboration with Nazi Germany. The main character is a young American woman, Naneé, who has lived in Europe for a decade and taken up with a resistance group formed to assist artists and others to escape the impending Nazis. The plot has a split storyline, one following Naneé and the other trailing a photographer Edouard Moss who has taken some subversive photos. This has o THE POSTMISTRESS OF PARIS Meg Waite Clayton This historical fiction is set in Paris just before and after the occupation or collaboration with Nazi Germany. The main character is a young American woman, Naneé, who has lived in Europe for a decade and taken up with a resistance group formed to assist artists and others to escape the impending Nazis. The plot has a split storyline, one following Naneé and the other trailing a photographer Edouard Moss who has taken some subversive photos. This has of course made him fairly unpopular with the established governments and he ends up interned in a French labor camp. The issue is that his young daughter was traveling with him and has been taken on by a friend, but Edouard has no idea where she really is, but he does know that he must find her. The members of the resistance group are aware of his plight and make arrangements to attempt to free him while he is still in French custody. They chose Naneé to make the attempt. She has been working as an information courier and delivering information to those attempting to flee that sometimes is less than what they want to hear. Her identification is the Postmistress. Although she is able to sway the camp commander to release Edouard, he has gone by then. The book is loosely based on the life of Mary Jayne Gold, Miriam Davenport, and the group run by Varian Fry that worked to help intellectuals escape. I found the book quite interesting despite being a bit slow and fluffy in places. It was after all a romance story set in a historic time period. I was surprised that it had not made a bigger splash on Goodreads than it has. 4 stars Happy Reading!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Helena

    The Postmistress of Paris is set during a side of World War II that I really didn’t know much about. At the start of the war, well-known artists, musicians and intellectuals, having fled Hitler’s regime, headed to France for safety but were held in internment camps due to the French government fearing they were enemies, spies, or both. Protagonist Nanée, aka The Postmistress, devotes her time to the perilous task of delivering messages to those in hiding and helping to smuggle out those detained The Postmistress of Paris is set during a side of World War II that I really didn’t know much about. At the start of the war, well-known artists, musicians and intellectuals, having fled Hitler’s regime, headed to France for safety but were held in internment camps due to the French government fearing they were enemies, spies, or both. Protagonist Nanée, aka The Postmistress, devotes her time to the perilous task of delivering messages to those in hiding and helping to smuggle out those detained in internment camps. Historical fiction at its best, in my humble opinion. I love tales of bravery, of people who risk their lives to help save others. And that was at the heart of this book. I thought it was fantastic. The Postmistress of Paris had me hooked from the get-go, but by the second half, I had utterly fallen in love with these characters; I was emotionally invested in a big way. There were moments where I would take a sharp intake of breath, or my heart would be in my mouth, or there would be a lump in my throat – I love stories that give you a physical reaction like that. I could not stop reading, yet I had to stall at the last section: I felt really scared to read on; what would become of these wonderful characters? Enthrallingly brilliant, and I could not put it down.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bookclubcheerleader

    Meg does it again! She tells a story from a different angle! WW2 story like you've never read. A smart and pensive read about a character you're likely to never forget! Meg does it again! She tells a story from a different angle! WW2 story like you've never read. A smart and pensive read about a character you're likely to never forget!

  17. 4 out of 5

    SS

    If you enjoy WWII novels crafted with excellent writing, complex characters, and an intriguing storyline, then this is likely the right book for you. It contains a powerful story about people caught in an untenable situation. They are helped by those who don’t have to help them, people putting their own lives at risk, because it was the right thing to do. Those people go to extraordinary lengths to outwit and defeat evil. I loved this book. I think it was the characters who made me love it. Luki If you enjoy WWII novels crafted with excellent writing, complex characters, and an intriguing storyline, then this is likely the right book for you. It contains a powerful story about people caught in an untenable situation. They are helped by those who don’t have to help them, people putting their own lives at risk, because it was the right thing to do. Those people go to extraordinary lengths to outwit and defeat evil. I loved this book. I think it was the characters who made me love it. Luki is such an endearing child, Nanée an amazing and brave woman, and Edouard, interesting and talented. This is a book about loss and trust and love – not just romantic love, but the kind of love people create for those who care about them; how they use that kind of love to form their own chosen family. This book is almost guaranteed to break your heart and then stitch it back together The last few chapters were so hard to read because I worried so that something terrible was about to happen. It did, and it didn’t. I can’t share more than that. Read the book, it’s definitely worth your time. I received an e-copy of this book through Netgalley. I thank all involved for their generosity, but it had no effect on this review. All opinions in this review reflect my true and honest reactions to reading this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    The Postmistress of Paris is the story of a young American heiress, Naneé, who left her home in the midwest, to live in Paris. When war breaks out, this free-spirited young woman and her dog, relocate to Southern France where she joins the resistance. Naneé works with American jounalist, Varian Fry delivering messages to people in hiding, thus the name, The Postmistress. Being American, she was given more freedom than the French. At times, she also participated in bringing some of them to safety The Postmistress of Paris is the story of a young American heiress, Naneé, who left her home in the midwest, to live in Paris. When war breaks out, this free-spirited young woman and her dog, relocate to Southern France where she joins the resistance. Naneé works with American jounalist, Varian Fry delivering messages to people in hiding, thus the name, The Postmistress. Being American, she was given more freedom than the French. At times, she also participated in bringing some of them to safety. The story and Naneé's character is inspired by Mary Jayne Gold, an American heiress from Chicago, who helped artists and intellectuals escape Nazi-controlled Europe. The story is set in southern France during 1940-1941, before the US became involved in WWII. The first part of the book is a bit slow, but it picks up and I became invested in the story. Naneé's character was very well developed and believable. Her courage, caring nature and willingness to risk her own life to help others is inspiring. One of the main people that Naneé is involved with is photographer Edouard Moss and his daughter. He was arrested and placed in a camp, separated from his daughter, who he promised his wife he would never be separated from before she was killed by the nazis. I was very impressed with Edouard as well. He took pictures of some of the atrocities risking his own life so the world would know what was happening in Germany and beyond the borders as the nazis took control of more countries. I enjoy books based on real life characters, and MaryJane Gould was a great person, using her own personal wealth to help others, as well as risking her own life. The Postmistress of Paris is a well written historical fiction story that I recommend. I always like learning about people or events I do not know a lot about and this happened with this book. There are a few disturbing scenes in this story, one involving a sexual encounter that could be a trigger for some people, but it is not explicitly described and is an integral part of the story. There is also some romance that was not a huge part of the story and I'm not sure if it was necessary, but it did not detract from the story. Overall an excellent story. Imani Jade Powers and Graham Halstead narrated the audiobook and did a very good job. Their pacing, tone, expression, accents and voices were all well done and added to my enjoyment of the story. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book upon request. The rating and opinions shared are my own.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Luanne Ollivier

    3.5 There are many, many WWII novels written from a woman's perspective and/or featuring a role in the war performed by women. Bombgirls, landgirls, codebreakers and more. Meg Waite Clayton's new novel, The Postmistress of Paris is part of that more, bringing in another perspective. Her main character is Naneé, a wealthy American living in Paris who decides to join the French resistance. Her wealth and American passport allow her to move about freely, delivering messages to those in hiding. She' 3.5 There are many, many WWII novels written from a woman's perspective and/or featuring a role in the war performed by women. Bombgirls, landgirls, codebreakers and more. Meg Waite Clayton's new novel, The Postmistress of Paris is part of that more, bringing in another perspective. Her main character is Naneé, a wealthy American living in Paris who decides to join the French resistance. Her wealth and American passport allow her to move about freely, delivering messages to those in hiding. She's a great lead character - brave, daring and charming with a strong sense of right and wrong and duty. She meets photographer Edouard and his young daughter Luki at a gathering of artistes. Edouard has escaped from Germany, but still must try to hide from the Vichy government. It is after this meeting that Naneé decides she must help artistes to escape and to preserve their work. Now, here's the really neat part - Naneé is based on the life of Mary Jayne Gold, a Chicago heiress, who helped American journalist Varian Fry smuggle well-known artists and intellectuals out of France. The book's opening chapters introduce us to the two main players, the sparks that fly between them, as well as the artistic setting/element of the book. I must admit, I did find this went on a bit too long for me. I wanted to dive right into the 'action' of the book. The hiding, the subterfuge and the danger. That does come, but Waite Clayton also stops along the way to explore other themes such as the love between a parent and child, the loss of loved ones and the sacrifices made. Different views are provided with Luki having her own chapters, as does Edouard. There are many supporting players, all just as determined with the same goal. I did find one character to be quite detestable as he plays 'games' at the house that the group shares. I thought there would be a reason he was included, but never found a meaning for his inclusion and ugliness. But he is tempered with the addition of a dog to the tale - named Dagobert. A good addition to the WWII fiction list. Waite Clayton is a talented wordsmith and I did enjoy this novel. However, I did find it to be a bit of a slow burn for me and it felt a repetitive at times. I chose to listen to The Postmistress of Paris. The readers were Imani Jade Powers and Graham Halstead. Powers has such a rich, melodious, honeyed tone to her voice. It's very pleasant to listen to and easy to understand. The voice for Naneé, absolutely captured the character as I had imagined her. Her speaking speed was just right. There are many French language bits to the story and I found both her pronunciation and accent to be believable. Her performance did justice to Waite Clayton's book. I've also listened to Graham Halstead in the past. He has a very resonant tone to his voice that draws the listener to him. He too speaks clearly and is easy to understand. I like his voice very much, but it wasn't quite what I imagined for Edouard. I had a softer, more continental voice in mind. That being said, he does do a fine job with his narration. Length is 13 hours, 10 minutes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Hope comes in different ways! A World War II novel. Fascinating story inspired by American heiress Mary Jane Gold, Nanée is a wealthy young woman caught up in efforts to help artists and intellectuals to escape France during WWII. Nanée, whom many saw as an eccentric, is a pilot, a focused individual. She’s determined, a person who just rolls up her sleeves and gets on with the task. There’s the heady energy of various artistic and intellectual giants such as André Breton, as the Nazis march towar Hope comes in different ways! A World War II novel. Fascinating story inspired by American heiress Mary Jane Gold, Nanée is a wealthy young woman caught up in efforts to help artists and intellectuals to escape France during WWII. Nanée, whom many saw as an eccentric, is a pilot, a focused individual. She’s determined, a person who just rolls up her sleeves and gets on with the task. There’s the heady energy of various artistic and intellectual giants such as André Breton, as the Nazis march towards Paris. I loved the description of Nanée flying into Paris for a Surrealist exhibition, adding further to the illustration that Nanée is an original who charts her own path. I smiled at the image of her next to her plane with her dog Dagobert as she, “dug out a reliable old black Chanel dress and pulled it over her head, slipped her blouse off underneath, and let the silk fall into place over her leather flight pants. Better. Not warmer, but better. She added her flight jacket again, for warmth. Could she just wear the leather pants and boots with the dress? It was a Surrealist exhibit, after all.“ This gives us an idea of the person who helps artists to escape the Nazi regime, of her doggedness, her commitment to the cause. Nanée’s meeting at the exhibition with photographer Edouard Moss and his daughter Luki is just the beginning of a chain of events that sweep them and us along in the upheaval of these times. A Harper ARC via NetGalley Please note: Quotes taken from an advanced reading copy maybe subject to change

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maggie McDermott

    This is a very generous rounding up of 2.5. I had a lot of issues with The Postmistress, but there is a sweetness because of Luki that I can’t ignore. The historical part of this historical fiction is allllllllll over the board. I didn’t think it was well done and it felt very discombobulated a lot of the time. The timeline shifts randomly and flashbacks/past memories aren’t well explained. I don’t necessarily recommend this, but I’m glad to have some exposure to what this book aims to be about.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Charla Wilson

    This was such an enjoyable book. The story takes place during WWII and is centered around a wealthy, beautiful American heiress that is a pilot and also a member of the resistance. Nanee becomes known as the Postmistress because she provides information to people that are hiding from the Nazis. Most of Nanee’s friends are artists and her focus is primarily on helping them escape from war torn France. She befriends a photographer and his young daughter and puts herself in harms way numerous times This was such an enjoyable book. The story takes place during WWII and is centered around a wealthy, beautiful American heiress that is a pilot and also a member of the resistance. Nanee becomes known as the Postmistress because she provides information to people that are hiding from the Nazis. Most of Nanee’s friends are artists and her focus is primarily on helping them escape from war torn France. She befriends a photographer and his young daughter and puts herself in harms way numerous times in an effort to get them out of harms way. The story is loosely based Mary Jayne Gold who was a real life heiress that worked to get artists out of Nazis occupied France.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Landers

    This book was fine -- it wasn't life changingly good but I think there still could have been some improvements. I appreciated what the author was trying to do -- and liked that it was based on a true story because the plot was super interesting to me. However, I wish the characters had been more well-rounded so it would be easier to connect with them. At times, the writing felt jumbled -- and there were times when a character would suddenly be named and accounted for in a certain room... despite This book was fine -- it wasn't life changingly good but I think there still could have been some improvements. I appreciated what the author was trying to do -- and liked that it was based on a true story because the plot was super interesting to me. However, I wish the characters had been more well-rounded so it would be easier to connect with them. At times, the writing felt jumbled -- and there were times when a character would suddenly be named and accounted for in a certain room... despite the book never detailing that character's release/journey to that moment. So, it felt like a couple of people were popping up randomly here and there. Furthermore, I really did not like the ending -- it was so unsatisfying and left me with a lot of unanswered questions. And, finally, this book was billed to me as a historical romance but I feel it's more strongly a historical fiction with a hint of romance here and there so if you're going in thinking it's a romance, you're bound to be disappointed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

    Revisit the dark early days of the German occupation in France in this haunting novel—a love story and a tale of high-stakes danger and incomparable courage—about a young American heiress who helps artists hunted by the Nazis escape from war-torn Europe. I love historical fiction because it often has undertones or inspiration based on true stories. In this case, the story is inspired by the real-life Heiress, Mary Gold who worked with American journalist Varian Fry to smuggle artists and intellec Revisit the dark early days of the German occupation in France in this haunting novel—a love story and a tale of high-stakes danger and incomparable courage—about a young American heiress who helps artists hunted by the Nazis escape from war-torn Europe. I love historical fiction because it often has undertones or inspiration based on true stories. In this case, the story is inspired by the real-life Heiress, Mary Gold who worked with American journalist Varian Fry to smuggle artists and intellectuals out of France. However, despite being well researched and based on a real-life person, the story didn’t land with me. I found it a bit slow at the start and wanted to hear more about the actual delivery of messages and the work she was doing. Many readers did love the story, it just didn’t land with me this time.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (earlgreyreads)

    The Postmistress of Paris is a beautiful story of a fearless group of friends and refugees in Paris who put the safety of others above their own! It is a unique take on WWII fiction. When Germans occupy Paris, Naneé, an American living in Paris, joins the resistance as a Postmistress. After briefly meeting the German artist Eduoard Moss and his little girl, she feels a strong to connection to them. Later their lives intertwine again, giving rise to difficult decisions! I loved Naneé and her intro The Postmistress of Paris is a beautiful story of a fearless group of friends and refugees in Paris who put the safety of others above their own! It is a unique take on WWII fiction. When Germans occupy Paris, Naneé, an American living in Paris, joins the resistance as a Postmistress. After briefly meeting the German artist Eduoard Moss and his little girl, she feels a strong to connection to them. Later their lives intertwine again, giving rise to difficult decisions! I loved Naneé and her introspective manner! I love that she is based on the real life Mary Jayne Gold, an American journalist who helped move persons of interest out of France. It is a slower story, but it is lovely to get to know the characters and see their connections develop. There are some funny moments along with the heart breaking! I loved The Last Train to London and was so happy to read Meg Waite Clayton's new book! Thanks to HarperCollins Canada for my copy!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melania

    4+🌟…an engrossing read that really make you root for the characters. This book reminds me a little of the Nightingale(a light version of it), and it is great historical fiction from the standpoint of an American heiress, her friends and the beginning and part of Nazi occupation in France. My favorite character was her sister in law T and her relationship with her dog. The story is not set in Paris for long, but in the south of France.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Thanks to the author/publisher for the Goodreads giveaway!! This is a hard read - wonderful story, but often very emotionally taxing, especially if you remind yourself that much of it is based on true events. I did love reading it, but probably wasn’t adequately emotionally prepared for the story and weight. I had a real love/hate relationship with the ending as I wanted a different end to the story but was proud of the author for staying true to history after taking us down a fictional path for Thanks to the author/publisher for the Goodreads giveaway!! This is a hard read - wonderful story, but often very emotionally taxing, especially if you remind yourself that much of it is based on true events. I did love reading it, but probably wasn’t adequately emotionally prepared for the story and weight. I had a real love/hate relationship with the ending as I wanted a different end to the story but was proud of the author for staying true to history after taking us down a fictional path for the last 1/4 of the book. Overall, a wonderful read but be ready for some heartache.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dana Simon

    In May 2010, my husband and I celebrated our 20th anniversary by traveling from Paris to Avignon by car. We visited markets, wineries, chateaus, synagogues, cathedrals, small towns etc. While in an Aix-en-Provence, we spoke to a Jewish shop keeper who told us that there was a transit camp 15 min away where the Nazis interned creative artists at a brick factory. We drove there and found a train box car, memorial stone and some photos depicting what happened there. There was a small building that In May 2010, my husband and I celebrated our 20th anniversary by traveling from Paris to Avignon by car. We visited markets, wineries, chateaus, synagogues, cathedrals, small towns etc. While in an Aix-en-Provence, we spoke to a Jewish shop keeper who told us that there was a transit camp 15 min away where the Nazis interned creative artists at a brick factory. We drove there and found a train box car, memorial stone and some photos depicting what happened there. There was a small building that inside was covered floor to ceiling by artwork drawn in chalk, paint, pen and pencil. It was amazing. But the most shocking to us was the Camp Des Milles brick factory. We weren’t able to tour it but did drive around the compound. I can’t even begin to imagine what living in that camp was like. The camp isn’t in an area in the middle of nowhere. It’s inconceivable that a place like this could exist in the open so close to a major town in France. I truly enjoyed this book, first because it clarified and taught me info that I knew nothing about regarding surrealism, the resistance movement, Americans working to help Jewish refugees leave France etc. I highly recommend reading The Postmistress of Paris. Yet another enjoyable book by Meg Waite Clayton.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Val

    Review to come.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    DNF The historical fiction had great potential when reading the summary; however, that's where it ends. This book was too fluffy, slow, and watered down. This was a BOTM I ordered and I'm so disappointed. I read 135 pages out of 400 and that was it for me! DNF The historical fiction had great potential when reading the summary; however, that's where it ends. This book was too fluffy, slow, and watered down. This was a BOTM I ordered and I'm so disappointed. I read 135 pages out of 400 and that was it for me!

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