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Super Volcanoes: What They Reveal about Earth and the Worlds Beyond

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Volcanoes are capable of acts of pyrotechnical prowess verging on magic: they spout black magma more fluid than water, create shimmering cities of glass at the bottom of the ocean and frozen lakes of lava on the moon, and can even tip entire planets over. Between lava that melts and re-forms the landscape, and noxious volcanic gases that poison the atmosphere, volcanoes ha Volcanoes are capable of acts of pyrotechnical prowess verging on magic: they spout black magma more fluid than water, create shimmering cities of glass at the bottom of the ocean and frozen lakes of lava on the moon, and can even tip entire planets over. Between lava that melts and re-forms the landscape, and noxious volcanic gases that poison the atmosphere, volcanoes have threatened life on Earth countless times in our planet’s history. Yet despite their reputation for destruction, volcanoes are inseparable from the creation of our planet. A lively and utterly fascinating guide to these geologic wonders, Super Volcanoes revels in the incomparable power of volcanic eruptions past and present, Earthbound and otherwise—and recounts the daring and sometimes death-defying careers of the scientists who study them. Science journalist and volcanologist Robin George Andrews explores how these eruptions reveal secrets about the worlds to which they belong, describing the stunning ways in which volcanoes can sculpt the sea, land, and sky, and even influence the machinery that makes or breaks the existence of life. Walking us through the mechanics of some of the most infamous eruptions on Earth, Andrews outlines what we know about how volcanoes form, erupt, and evolve, as well as what scientists are still trying to puzzle out. How can we better predict when a deadly eruption will occur—and protect communities in the danger zone? Is Earth’s system of plate tectonics, unique in the solar system, the best way to forge a planet that supports life? And if life can survive and even thrive in Earth’s extreme volcanic environments—superhot, superacidic, and supersaline surroundings previously thought to be completely inhospitable—where else in the universe might we find it? Traveling from Hawai‘i, Yellowstone, Tanzania, and the ocean floor to the moon, Venus, and Mars, Andrews illuminates the cutting-edge discoveries and lingering scientific mysteries surrounding these phenomenal forces of nature.


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Volcanoes are capable of acts of pyrotechnical prowess verging on magic: they spout black magma more fluid than water, create shimmering cities of glass at the bottom of the ocean and frozen lakes of lava on the moon, and can even tip entire planets over. Between lava that melts and re-forms the landscape, and noxious volcanic gases that poison the atmosphere, volcanoes ha Volcanoes are capable of acts of pyrotechnical prowess verging on magic: they spout black magma more fluid than water, create shimmering cities of glass at the bottom of the ocean and frozen lakes of lava on the moon, and can even tip entire planets over. Between lava that melts and re-forms the landscape, and noxious volcanic gases that poison the atmosphere, volcanoes have threatened life on Earth countless times in our planet’s history. Yet despite their reputation for destruction, volcanoes are inseparable from the creation of our planet. A lively and utterly fascinating guide to these geologic wonders, Super Volcanoes revels in the incomparable power of volcanic eruptions past and present, Earthbound and otherwise—and recounts the daring and sometimes death-defying careers of the scientists who study them. Science journalist and volcanologist Robin George Andrews explores how these eruptions reveal secrets about the worlds to which they belong, describing the stunning ways in which volcanoes can sculpt the sea, land, and sky, and even influence the machinery that makes or breaks the existence of life. Walking us through the mechanics of some of the most infamous eruptions on Earth, Andrews outlines what we know about how volcanoes form, erupt, and evolve, as well as what scientists are still trying to puzzle out. How can we better predict when a deadly eruption will occur—and protect communities in the danger zone? Is Earth’s system of plate tectonics, unique in the solar system, the best way to forge a planet that supports life? And if life can survive and even thrive in Earth’s extreme volcanic environments—superhot, superacidic, and supersaline surroundings previously thought to be completely inhospitable—where else in the universe might we find it? Traveling from Hawai‘i, Yellowstone, Tanzania, and the ocean floor to the moon, Venus, and Mars, Andrews illuminates the cutting-edge discoveries and lingering scientific mysteries surrounding these phenomenal forces of nature.

30 review for Super Volcanoes: What They Reveal about Earth and the Worlds Beyond

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mark Hartzer

    This is a good book with a misleading title. This is really a book about vulcanism in general as true super volcanoes make up only a fraction of the contents, as there is only a single chapter (out of 8) devoted to super volcanoes per se. I really enjoyed his detailed and in depth coverage of Yellowstone. Contrary to popular opinion, the Yellowstone caldera is not going to erupt anytime soon, and likely never again. We also learn that there are no such things as 'magma chambers' as there have be This is a good book with a misleading title. This is really a book about vulcanism in general as true super volcanoes make up only a fraction of the contents, as there is only a single chapter (out of 8) devoted to super volcanoes per se. I really enjoyed his detailed and in depth coverage of Yellowstone. Contrary to popular opinion, the Yellowstone caldera is not going to erupt anytime soon, and likely never again. We also learn that there are no such things as 'magma chambers' as there have been exactly zero instances where they have been observed or detected by scientists. Dr. Andrews (he has a PhD in volcanology) advises that underneath the caldera, it is actually more like a giant sponge filled with "hellish gelatin". The liquid is more buoyant than the surrounding crystalline structure, and rises to the surface. I didn't know this, but eruptions are measured in strength much like the Fujita scale for tornadoes. The scale is called the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI), and runs from zero to VEI 8. Like the EF scale each level higher is exponentially more powerful than the previous. A VEI zero "...is assigned to eruptions that effuse a modicum of lava and debris and have ash plumes no more than a few hundred feet high." "A VEI 8 eruption, the very top of the scale, is anything that produces at least 240 cubic miles of volcanic material during its explosive eruption." (240 cubic miles = 1,000 cubic kilometers.) The 1st Yellowstone eruption 2.1 million years ago ejected 588 cubic miles of material and the the Doha super volcano explosion of 74,000 years ago ejected 270 miles of material. Unfortunately, this is pretty much all we hear about super volcanoes. We don't even get a list of exactly how many we have here on Earth. An even bigger failing is the utter lack of maps, diagrams or photos. The book discusses Jupiter's moons extensively, yet each chapter gets a single black and white photo. Finally, I found Dr. Andrews' breezy narration distracting. I've read doctoral dissertations, so I'm OK with footnotes and endnotes not to mention fairly dry reading of various facts. Thankfully, this is not a dissertation, but I think it could have done with less 'humorous' interludes. Science does not have to be comedy. Here is a random example on pp. 143-144. "But it wasn't long before he and his colleagues used their knowledge of the Moon's chemistry gained from these samples to cook up their own batches of lunar lasagna. 'You can make a synthetic Moon rock really easily,' he nonchalantly tells me. You play about with different compounds-a pinch of iron oxide here, a cup of titanium oxide there-and eventually, you get a rock that can replicate not just the chemistry, but also the textures and crystalline structures you see in the real deal. This sounds like witchcraft to me. 'It's an art.' Grove replies, with a slight shrug." This isn't terrible by any means, but I find this kind of narration distracting. But that is a minor quibble. There is a lot of information here and everyone has their own style. If you want to read about about volcanoes in general, and how they erupt both here on Earth as well as other parts of the solar system, here you go.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ian McGaffey

    This is an awesome read, I forgot how fun volcanoes are. They represent a vital process of our planet and the solar system. I wasn't very aware how much we knew about extraterrestrial volcanoes, but the author does a great job covering volcanoes on earth and elsewhere. This is an awesome read, I forgot how fun volcanoes are. They represent a vital process of our planet and the solar system. I wasn't very aware how much we knew about extraterrestrial volcanoes, but the author does a great job covering volcanoes on earth and elsewhere.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    I would have preferred to have *much* more detail about terrestrial volcanoes and volcanologists. Still, I enjoyed what Andrews gave us. > Around 252 million years ago, a planet already suffering from ecological turmoil was also baking thanks to the ~2-million-year-long eruption of lava gushing out of what is now Siberia. This continental-scale volcanism, unleashing climate-perturbing gases of its own, also ignited a huge reservoir of coal, triggering a global warming offensive. When all was sai I would have preferred to have *much* more detail about terrestrial volcanoes and volcanologists. Still, I enjoyed what Andrews gave us. > Around 252 million years ago, a planet already suffering from ecological turmoil was also baking thanks to the ~2-million-year-long eruption of lava gushing out of what is now Siberia. This continental-scale volcanism, unleashing climate-perturbing gases of its own, also ignited a huge reservoir of coal, triggering a global warming offensive. When all was said and done, this Murder on the Orient Express–style apocalypse killed more than nine out of every ten marine species and seven out of ten terrestrial vertebrate species—birds, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and so forth—on the planet. This event, aptly known as the Great Dying, was easily the worst mass extinction in Earth’s history and its darkest chapter. > that heat isn’t extreme enough at present to keep both [Yellowstone] reservoirs completely molten. Get a fresh injection of hot molten rock from below, say, and sure, more of the reservoir cooks and melts. But what you have for the most part is solid rock, with a network of molten ponds, pools, and slivers. Sometimes more of it is molten, sometimes less. Think of it as a strange sponge, with the holes filled with a hellish gelatin. That gelatin, being hotter than the cooler, frozen volcanic crystals around it, is naturally buoyant, and the laws of physics demand that it rise as best as it can. It exploits zones of structural weakness, like big holes in the sponge, as it makes its ascent. Magma chambers aren’t really cavernous gaps in the crust at all, but reservoirs of mush, serpents of partially molten rock confined within a labyrinth of crystals. They are Beelzebub’s sponges. … Yellowstone’s sponges may be gigantic, but they are mostly frozen right now. Seismic data suggest that the upper reservoir is between 5 and 15 percent molten. The lower reservoir is only 2 percent molten > The crust being thicker on the farside could be explained by a really cool idea from 2014 named Earthshine. Back when the Moon formed, it was much closer to Earth, perhaps only 8,000 miles away, compared with today’s distance of nearly 240,000 miles > Several thermometers were buried in the lunar soil by the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 missions and kept running from 1971 to 1977. It was hoped they would take the Moon’s internal temperature, but as they only went a few feet into the ground, they were affected by whatever was happening at the surface. Scientists found that they registered a curious uptick in temperature during the duration of the heat-flow experiment. This was found to be the astronauts’ fault: as they bounded about, they kicked up a lot of lunar soil. This made the surface rougher, making it less able to reflect sunlight, and causing the surface to warm up > Mars, like the Moon, also has two hemispheres that are vastly different from each other: a southern, highly cratered highlands section with crust up to 62 miles thick, and a northern, smooth lowlands section with a paltry 19-mile-thick crust > Mars, like Earth, also has mud volcanoes. They are exactly what they sound like: buoyant or pressurized mud bubbles up out of holes in the ground. Terrestrial mud is fairly runny. But Mars’s thin atmosphere means that the average surface temperature is –81 degrees Fahrenheit. This quickly freezes the tops of these mud flows, insulating the mud below and letting it flow over long distances like gloopy lava in tunnels in Hawai‘i. > The trapped gases within martian meteorites, when compared with present-day measurements by robots suggest that most of Mars’s early atmosphere had been obliterated just 500 million years or so after Mars was born. If true, that implies Mars was almost always an acutely frigid place with a very low atmospheric pressure. It would have been incredibly difficult, if not impossible, to have long-lived river systems, lakes, and oceans much later in its history—and yet the once wet valleys and basins suggest otherwise. So did the planet dry up or didn’t it? Most researchers I spoke to are coming around to the idea that Mars was never warm and wet, but icy and damp. The ancient martian atmosphere would have had so little carbon dioxide that it would be impossible to get the global Mars temperature above freezing and keep it there. Fortunately, that’s no problem for liquid water. In Antarctica’s McMurdo Dry Valleys, you still have substantial lakes trapped beneath ice. The mercury only rises above freezing for a couple of days per year, but that’s enough to melt glaciers and snow to supply meltwater to underground lakes > Mantle plumes, aiming at tectonic plates on Earth, have moving targets to hit. On Mars, their targets are stationary. > on Io, so much new magma keeps gushing up through massive, diabolical esophaguses and onto the surface that the crust gets squashed down. This, says Davies, sometimes snaps the crust upward, forming sudden mountains 12 miles high. > what are the odds that you have a planet like the Earth in the Goldilocks zone—not too hot, not too cold, where all the conditions are just right—versus having moons around the larger planets we know, like Neptune-size and up … there’s a lot of these bigger planets and they might have moons where tidal heating may be a factor. You may have more ocean worlds with frozen icy crusts than Goldilocks worlds like the Earth.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    James Easterson

    An extremely readable book, fun and informative. Not just about earthbound volcanoes but about our fellow planets and the instance of life and possibly of life beyond what you might realize before reading this book. Along with some fascinating history written in a familiar and informal way, this is a book worth the read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    I found this interesting. He starts with the recent Hawaiian volcano and works his way across Earth then into space and the other planets explaining how volcanoes have affected the Earth and the other planets. He also delves into what make other planets uninhabitable using their volcanoes as the point of reference. Mr. Andrews gets into some of the debates between scientists and volcanologists. There were times I did not understand what he was saying (not a big science person) but as I read more I found this interesting. He starts with the recent Hawaiian volcano and works his way across Earth then into space and the other planets explaining how volcanoes have affected the Earth and the other planets. He also delves into what make other planets uninhabitable using their volcanoes as the point of reference. Mr. Andrews gets into some of the debates between scientists and volcanologists. There were times I did not understand what he was saying (not a big science person) but as I read more I understood more. By the time I got to the last chapters with Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn I did understand what was happening and why in the world of volcanoes. Worth the read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I have always been fascinated with Volcanoes so this was a treat to read from start to finish, with very little scientific 'jargon'. Robin takes you on a fascinating journey from the submarine volcanoes in the deepest parts of the ocean, to Mars, Venus and the Moon. What I love about this book, is that it doesn't just focus on the popular 'supervolcanoes',' such as Yellowstone. The interviews with other scientists are a brilliant touch. People who are passionate about their research can explain th I have always been fascinated with Volcanoes so this was a treat to read from start to finish, with very little scientific 'jargon'. Robin takes you on a fascinating journey from the submarine volcanoes in the deepest parts of the ocean, to Mars, Venus and the Moon. What I love about this book, is that it doesn't just focus on the popular 'supervolcanoes',' such as Yellowstone. The interviews with other scientists are a brilliant touch. People who are passionate about their research can explain things better than anyone else, and they make the book even more interesting. It took me longer than expected to finish this, because I spent most of it Googling bits and pieces that really interested me. Would highly recommend this to readers of a certain newspaper that seems to be obsessed over Yellowstone

  7. 5 out of 5

    Parker

    ten year old me agrees that rocks indeed rock

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Very well-organized and easy to read book about volcanoes on Earth and other terrestrial objects. I especially enjoyed the chapter on volcanoes on the ocean floor.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bryanna Plog

    Excellent treatment of volcanism, especially in regards to outside Earth. Well-written science writing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Living so near Mt. St. Helens, I love any new volcano information. Andrews' first two chapters cover Kilauea and Yellowstone. His descriptions of the start of the ferocious 2018 blast-out, blow-out reminded me of seeing all the video and news about it. And I've actually done serious hobbyist study of Yellowstone. It's the real supervolcano of the book, among so many super volcanoes that he obviously loves. Weird volcanoes in the East Africa rift and undersea eruptions are well described in follo Living so near Mt. St. Helens, I love any new volcano information. Andrews' first two chapters cover Kilauea and Yellowstone. His descriptions of the start of the ferocious 2018 blast-out, blow-out reminded me of seeing all the video and news about it. And I've actually done serious hobbyist study of Yellowstone. It's the real supervolcano of the book, among so many super volcanoes that he obviously loves. Weird volcanoes in the East Africa rift and undersea eruptions are well described in following chapters. But the surprise came in final chapters with his review of current understanding of volcanoes on Mars, Venus and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Finding this book, I did not expect otherworldly volcanism! Plenty of scientific speculation there! Andrews has a PhD in volcanology, but has chosen to be a science journalist. He's done his homework and includes many interview results to popularize the reading. But I would have loved a few photos so I wouldn't have to look for them separately on Google. A reminder of Fissure 8 or a closeup of a lovely brecciated lava flow in Yellowstone would've been pahoehoe frosting on the basalt cake. And a few NASA photos from numerous missions to the planets.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    A slightly misleading title; nevertheless, an exuberant exploration of what we know about volcanoes. The book's title may suggest it is about supervolcanoes, and the author does speak of Yellowstone but proves dismissive of the idea of the "supervolcano." Instead, the author is enamored with volcanoes in general. One travels with him across the world and explores all kinds of different types of volcanoes. Great detail is given about Kilauea in Hawaii; what may happen at Yellowstone; interesting v A slightly misleading title; nevertheless, an exuberant exploration of what we know about volcanoes. The book's title may suggest it is about supervolcanoes, and the author does speak of Yellowstone but proves dismissive of the idea of the "supervolcano." Instead, the author is enamored with volcanoes in general. One travels with him across the world and explores all kinds of different types of volcanoes. Great detail is given about Kilauea in Hawaii; what may happen at Yellowstone; interesting volcanoes in the Great Rift Valley; and undersea volcanoes. The author then explores what we know of volcanism in our solar system: the previous history of volcanism on the Moon; the volcanic activity of Mars in the past, possibly the present; questions about Venus; and much about the volcanism we have seen on moons of Jupiter and Saturn. The author's enthusiasm for the subject is infectious but we could have done without the attempts at verbal memes and cliches. A great read if you are interested in geology or volcanism.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Myc

    This review is for an advanced copy of the book. Robin George Andrews has created an extremely accessible and readable book on volcanoes—which is not a sentence I ever expected to write. Volcanoes are evocative and fascinating and have captured humanity's imagination for as long as there have been people. And Andrews' style makes their natural wonder all the more captivating. A trained volcanologist as well as a science journalist, Andrews makes the complexities of volcanoes feel simple and demy This review is for an advanced copy of the book. Robin George Andrews has created an extremely accessible and readable book on volcanoes—which is not a sentence I ever expected to write. Volcanoes are evocative and fascinating and have captured humanity's imagination for as long as there have been people. And Andrews' style makes their natural wonder all the more captivating. A trained volcanologist as well as a science journalist, Andrews makes the complexities of volcanoes feel simple and demystifies the processes that create volcanoes on our world and beyond—and explores why they are so important. Super Volcanoes is an enjoyable read, but a little uneven in its pacing. It is a book that is accessible for the layperson yet deep enough for science aficionados. Recommended for anyone interested in the subject or anyone interested in popular science.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    Super Volcanoes was a light, fun and informative popular science read. This book is great for people who don't know a lot about the topic because it covers a broad range from historical volcanoes to land volcanoes to sea volcanoes and even into space describing volcanic activity on our moon and several other planets. I enjoyed the combination of history and science. My favorite chapter was the one about volcanic activity on our moon. This is a topic that was a fascinating read, and that I haven' Super Volcanoes was a light, fun and informative popular science read. This book is great for people who don't know a lot about the topic because it covers a broad range from historical volcanoes to land volcanoes to sea volcanoes and even into space describing volcanic activity on our moon and several other planets. I enjoyed the combination of history and science. My favorite chapter was the one about volcanic activity on our moon. This is a topic that was a fascinating read, and that I haven't thought much about previously. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an advance copy of this book in return for an honest review. I enjoyed it a lot!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    The scope of the book is very good, an eye opener (at least to me) for covering volcanoes on the Moon, Mars, Venus, and certain moons of the big planets. Now I really appreciate the role volcanoes (and plate tectonics) plays in the evolution of planets/moons and even life. The only complaint I have is the usage of temperature, saying the temperature of A is 10 times higher than that of B just doesn't really make sense, because of the system in use. He can use Kelvin as unit, Celsius, or Fahrenhe The scope of the book is very good, an eye opener (at least to me) for covering volcanoes on the Moon, Mars, Venus, and certain moons of the big planets. Now I really appreciate the role volcanoes (and plate tectonics) plays in the evolution of planets/moons and even life. The only complaint I have is the usage of temperature, saying the temperature of A is 10 times higher than that of B just doesn't really make sense, because of the system in use. He can use Kelvin as unit, Celsius, or Fahrenheit (I don't think anybody in science fields will use this), the results will be very different.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Kress

    I could not put this book down! Really fascinating read not just about volcanoes on earth, but on other planets. Andrews writes very complex science in a very easy to understand way. There is so much more for scientists to understand about earth and the solar system, reading this made me want to know more. Timely read with the recent eruption in Tonga and if you are reading articles about it, most likely, Andrews is the author. I highly recommend this book. It's been the topic of conversation in I could not put this book down! Really fascinating read not just about volcanoes on earth, but on other planets. Andrews writes very complex science in a very easy to understand way. There is so much more for scientists to understand about earth and the solar system, reading this made me want to know more. Timely read with the recent eruption in Tonga and if you are reading articles about it, most likely, Andrews is the author. I highly recommend this book. It's been the topic of conversation in my house for days!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    I seem to be reading a lot about volcanoes lately (books and online articles), and "Super Volcanoes" is among the best. Robin George Andrews takes us on a journey around the earth (and below the seas), and into the solar system. This is written simply, so even the beginner can easily grasp the concepts, and makes this a fast, fun, and enjoyable read. My thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily and is entirely my own, unbiased, opinion. I seem to be reading a lot about volcanoes lately (books and online articles), and "Super Volcanoes" is among the best. Robin George Andrews takes us on a journey around the earth (and below the seas), and into the solar system. This is written simply, so even the beginner can easily grasp the concepts, and makes this a fast, fun, and enjoyable read. My thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily and is entirely my own, unbiased, opinion.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Rochelle

    Trying to understand time in terms of BILLIONS of years is such brain-trip, I can barely understand how time works this very second. I would have liked a little more introduction into volcano basics, I found myself searching for videos and further explanations in the early chapters. The planetary science and dives into Mars, Venus, etc, PLUS how understanding those planets helps us understand Earth -- SUPER COOL.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This book is not only interesting and informative, but also beautifully and evocatively written and regularly made me chuckle out loud. A compelling exploration of volcanoes, the people who study them, the history and mythology that surrounds them, and how they have impacted on the earth and the solar system. Hugely enjoyable, with many “wow” moments, learning things I had no idea about. I listened to the audiobook and the narration by Mike Cooper is excellent.

  19. 5 out of 5

    pianogal

    This one started and ended well, but it meandered a little in the middle. We got lost in all the volcanoes in space that no one knows much about. I was fascinated by Yellowstone (it might not be the sleeping monster it was reported to be) and the other Earth eruptions. I wish he would have just stayed on planet - although if I have to care about space (sigh), the section on Jupiter's moon of Io did grab my attention a little. If you like space volcanoes, this is definitely the book for you. This one started and ended well, but it meandered a little in the middle. We got lost in all the volcanoes in space that no one knows much about. I was fascinated by Yellowstone (it might not be the sleeping monster it was reported to be) and the other Earth eruptions. I wish he would have just stayed on planet - although if I have to care about space (sigh), the section on Jupiter's moon of Io did grab my attention a little. If you like space volcanoes, this is definitely the book for you.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I give 5 stars to books that completely upend my view of something. In this case, it's volcanoes and their use in the world as something other than "harbinger of doom." Beyond this thorough knowledge of how volcanoes work on Earth (and how they may work on Mars, Venus, and the moon Io), I adore Andrews' enthusiasm for the subject. He makes the science accessible without dumbing down or oversimplifying. I give 5 stars to books that completely upend my view of something. In this case, it's volcanoes and their use in the world as something other than "harbinger of doom." Beyond this thorough knowledge of how volcanoes work on Earth (and how they may work on Mars, Venus, and the moon Io), I adore Andrews' enthusiasm for the subject. He makes the science accessible without dumbing down or oversimplifying.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Wenger

    This book demystifies the concept of super volcanoes while at the same time giving us an in-depth look at numerous large volcanoes on Earth and other bodies in our solar system. It's written in a style that's easy for a layperson to understand and follow. Informative and entertaining, it's a good choice for anyone interested in earth science. Thanks, NetGalley, for the ARC I received. This is my honest and voluntary review. This book demystifies the concept of super volcanoes while at the same time giving us an in-depth look at numerous large volcanoes on Earth and other bodies in our solar system. It's written in a style that's easy for a layperson to understand and follow. Informative and entertaining, it's a good choice for anyone interested in earth science. Thanks, NetGalley, for the ARC I received. This is my honest and voluntary review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    I read this book in one sitting. Very rarely am I able to do that with nonfiction. This is a very easy to read, informative, scientific book about a fascinating topic. I found the sections on Yellowstone and the Lunar volcanos particularly interesting. I am very grateful to Goodreads for sending me a copy of this wonderful book. I look forward to more work from the author.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    I listened to this on audiobook through my library and now I’m going to buy it so I can listen again at leisure. It’s both an informative explanation of volcanoes across the solar system and a beautifully descriptive love letter to volcanology. I’ve read many books about volcanoes and geology and this is one of the best.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shana Yates

    3.5 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pancha

    A very engaging book that made me feel better about living on the near side of the continental divide from Yosemite and also took me into space to see ICE LAVA!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    LJ 146 (10) October 2021

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    I listened to the audiobook version, and the narrator's accent made it difficult for me to understand some of the terms. I listened to the audiobook version, and the narrator's accent made it difficult for me to understand some of the terms.

  28. 4 out of 5

    JSims

    What a fantastically fascinating read! If you’re at all interested in geology and planetary science, I highly recommend this book. 🌋

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was fun and really interesting. Each chapter was about a different volcano, on this planet or in our solar system.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Philip Orange

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