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100 Things We've Lost to the Internet

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The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost. NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY CHICAGO TRIBUNE AND THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS - "A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People R The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost. NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY CHICAGO TRIBUNE AND THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS - "A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People Remember all those ingrained habits, cherished ideas, beloved objects, and stubborn preferences from the pre-Internet age? They're gone. To some of those things we can say good riddance. But many we miss terribly. Whatever our emotional response to this departed realm, we are faced with the fact that nearly every aspect of modern life now takes place in filtered, isolated corners of cyberspace--a space that has slowly subsumed our physical habitats, replacing or transforming the office, our local library, a favorite bar, the movie theater, and the coffee shop where people met one another's gaze from across the room. Even as we've gained the ability to gather without leaving our house, many of the fundamentally human experiences that have sustained us have disappeared. In one hundred glimpses of that pre-Internet world, Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, presents a captivating record, enlivened with illustrations, of the world before cyberspace--from voicemails to blind dates to punctuation to civility. There are the small losses: postcards, the blessings of an adolescence largely spared of documentation, the Rolodex, and the genuine surprises at high school reunions. But there are larger repercussions, too: weaker memories, the inability to entertain oneself, and the utter demolition of privacy. 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet is at once an evocative swan song for a disappearing era and, perhaps, a guide to reclaiming just a little bit more of the world IRL.


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The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost. NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY CHICAGO TRIBUNE AND THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS - "A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People R The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost. NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY CHICAGO TRIBUNE AND THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS - "A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People Remember all those ingrained habits, cherished ideas, beloved objects, and stubborn preferences from the pre-Internet age? They're gone. To some of those things we can say good riddance. But many we miss terribly. Whatever our emotional response to this departed realm, we are faced with the fact that nearly every aspect of modern life now takes place in filtered, isolated corners of cyberspace--a space that has slowly subsumed our physical habitats, replacing or transforming the office, our local library, a favorite bar, the movie theater, and the coffee shop where people met one another's gaze from across the room. Even as we've gained the ability to gather without leaving our house, many of the fundamentally human experiences that have sustained us have disappeared. In one hundred glimpses of that pre-Internet world, Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, presents a captivating record, enlivened with illustrations, of the world before cyberspace--from voicemails to blind dates to punctuation to civility. There are the small losses: postcards, the blessings of an adolescence largely spared of documentation, the Rolodex, and the genuine surprises at high school reunions. But there are larger repercussions, too: weaker memories, the inability to entertain oneself, and the utter demolition of privacy. 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet is at once an evocative swan song for a disappearing era and, perhaps, a guide to reclaiming just a little bit more of the world IRL.

30 review for 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Again, deeply behind in my reviews here. My apologies. "100 Things We've Lost to the Internet" is moving funny, astute, and awash in the Proustian Madeleines that anyone who recalls a world before the Internet will savor. (And if you are too young to remember that world, then you will view this as a brilliant explanation of why your parents miss dittos, and the wonders of a childhood of benign neglect.) It's about things, yes, (the phone in the kitchen), but what makes it such a beautiful and rem Again, deeply behind in my reviews here. My apologies. "100 Things We've Lost to the Internet" is moving funny, astute, and awash in the Proustian Madeleines that anyone who recalls a world before the Internet will savor. (And if you are too young to remember that world, then you will view this as a brilliant explanation of why your parents miss dittos, and the wonders of a childhood of benign neglect.) It's about things, yes, (the phone in the kitchen), but what makes it such a beautiful and remarkable book is that Pamela Paul uses those totems to remind us of emotions and sensations that are now either forever transformed or forever gone (the power that came with a thick rolodex, and what that first rolodex meant). I loved this book: all carefully curated 100 chapters. Also? It makes a great gift. It is among the books I now give often to family and friends.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    I’m a fan of Paul’s NYT book review podcast, so I was excited to see she’d written a book. I enjoyed it. Paul does a good job of describing the good and the bad that has come from the massive shift the internet has brought to pretty much every part of our way of life. In Paul’s telling the changes are mostly bad, though I’m glad this book never turns into lament for “how things used to be.” This book is very New York heavy (and sometimes very French heavy?) but I found myself relating to a lot of I’m a fan of Paul’s NYT book review podcast, so I was excited to see she’d written a book. I enjoyed it. Paul does a good job of describing the good and the bad that has come from the massive shift the internet has brought to pretty much every part of our way of life. In Paul’s telling the changes are mostly bad, though I’m glad this book never turns into lament for “how things used to be.” This book is very New York heavy (and sometimes very French heavy?) but I found myself relating to a lot of what she writes: “How is it that activities that you’d never in a zillion years be roped into doing in real life - paging through an old acquaintance’s baby album, suffering through an odd slide show from Turkey - become strangely alluring online?” And it also got me reminiscing things I probably would have never thought about again: “That moment at the beginning of the first day of school when books were handed out - if you were lucky you got one of the shiny new ones, maybe even an updated edition, but if you were unlucky you had to write your name on the inside back cover under the name of the student who had your bio textbook last year - was a thing of the past. No getting excited or annoyed about which upperclassmen had your textbook before. No spending time trying to discern something about the previous owner by deciphering old doodles.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carey

    DNF at 21% I went in thinking this would be a thought provoking meditation on the ways in which life has changed with the digital age, but it's just one self-indulgent rant after another. I myself am a baby Gen Xer - I remember a time before the internet, but it's existed for the entirety of my adult life. I get it. Things have changed rapidly. That can be alarming or scary, but we grumble, adapt, and move on. I was already frustrated by the nostalgia in this book for things no one in their right DNF at 21% I went in thinking this would be a thought provoking meditation on the ways in which life has changed with the digital age, but it's just one self-indulgent rant after another. I myself am a baby Gen Xer - I remember a time before the internet, but it's existed for the entirety of my adult life. I get it. Things have changed rapidly. That can be alarming or scary, but we grumble, adapt, and move on. I was already frustrated by the nostalgia in this book for things no one in their right mind misses, like getting lost, being bored, or wasting money on rolls of film full of shitty pictures you don't know are shitty for weeks or months. But then we get to the school library and that is where I say fuck this book. Nostalgia for shushy librarians and silent libraries that acted as nothing more than moldering book repositories is gross. The library has evolved and is continuing to evolve into something better and more important than just a place to store books. I might not even be as pissed off about this as I am except that I was listening to the audio and the way the narrator spits out "media center" along with other newer terms for spaces that used to be libraries grated on me. Nostalgia is a tricky thing. It often lies. This book wallows in it. I'm really disappointed because I wanted to like it so much.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This book of short essays on things that the internet has removed from modern life is a very fun read. By turns wistful and funny, if you're old enough to remember the 1980's this is a treat. This book of short essays on things that the internet has removed from modern life is a very fun read. By turns wistful and funny, if you're old enough to remember the 1980's this is a treat.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nelly

    NOSTALGIC AND SADDENING This book should have been titled "Things We've Lost (and are still) Losing to the Internet" because it's not like the internet has 'ended' in a sense and we're done losing... it's still growing, becoming something many never imagined it could/would be and we're still losing many things on top of what we've already lost. Next will come the metaverse and if you think having to attend zoom meetings is bad, wait till you have to attend a virtual meeting in the metaverse where NOSTALGIC AND SADDENING This book should have been titled "Things We've Lost (and are still) Losing to the Internet" because it's not like the internet has 'ended' in a sense and we're done losing... it's still growing, becoming something many never imagined it could/would be and we're still losing many things on top of what we've already lost. Next will come the metaverse and if you think having to attend zoom meetings is bad, wait till you have to attend a virtual meeting in the metaverse where you have to show up as your avatar dressed in virtual office wear... because, "well, it's a work meeting and we can see (virtual) you, dress the part." Ok Yuck. Sorry, not sorry Zuckerberg. Here's the thing, the internet and in a wider sense, technology is here to stay. The people in Silicon Valley won't stop innovating because of people like me who, though we appreciate tech, also have some reservations on it's usage. Nobody asked Zuckerberg to create Facebook and change the way we communicate. They will never say " ok we've done enough, let's stop" Seriously though, THEY WILL NEVER STOP. It's up to you to say ENOUGH and limit and manage your usage. On to the book, it's nostalgic but also saddening. Remember landlines? Birthday cards? People giving you their full attention whilst conversing? Memorizing phone numbers? Not knowing what your English teacher from 5th grade had for lunch today?? Oh gosh remember handwritten letters?? Remember privacy?? This is what they took from us :(

  6. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Pamela Paul writes an essay about each of one hundred things that she feels we have lost to the Internet. Some are obvious to all of us, like flea market finds and high school reunions. Some are less so, like being late and benign neglect. All of the essays are thoughtful and engaging.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Greg Talbot

    "Connection" may be the most loaded word of the post-internet age. Pamela Paul describes 100 things in our pre-wired world that explore the ways we connected with materials (magazines, Christmas cards) and experiences (making memories, starting up life in a new city) . Written in skimmable, and easily digestible chapters, this catalog provides a mixed bag of the world we lost, and the one we are in currently. The book has a fun, unhurriedness about it, and it is agreeable in the content it provid "Connection" may be the most loaded word of the post-internet age. Pamela Paul describes 100 things in our pre-wired world that explore the ways we connected with materials (magazines, Christmas cards) and experiences (making memories, starting up life in a new city) . Written in skimmable, and easily digestible chapters, this catalog provides a mixed bag of the world we lost, and the one we are in currently. The book has a fun, unhurriedness about it, and it is agreeable in the content it provides. It hardly scratches the dark ways social media undermines mental health , political civility, and truth. That's a different kind of book, but the items Paul focuses on are largely Internet 1.0. And it's a very deliberate choice, but she explores what we missed, instead of what is gained through the integration of technologies. There is more than surface here, and there are a lot of things to ponder of the lost world. Our remembered selves are more fragmented, our social media more determinate, and our relationships largely more distant and alienated. Still, I think this book could have provided deeper trend analysis...sharing deeper insights into the world we lost. Also, the technology that has created the change...network speeds, social media, cell phone platforms, is never explored. A fun read. Something to click open and scroll through, when you can't find a paper magazine in sight.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

    This isn’t my typical read but I’m glad I found it while scrolling through NetGalley. Most of Paul’s list was way before my time, so I got to relive those while reading through the list. Most of the things he discussed are important concepts, since we’ve slowly been losing certain aspects of life thanks to the Internet.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kevidently

    I guess I thought it would be funnier. Essentially a listicle in book form, Pamela Paul's 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet felt like it should be interesting and thought-provoking, a little silly and a little profound. I LOVED her book, My Travels with Bob, about keeping track of all the books she read in a reading journal named Bob. But this? This was difficult. Every single topic - from "Boredom" to "Working Independently" to "Social Cues" and everything in between - feels like a harangue, I guess I thought it would be funnier. Essentially a listicle in book form, Pamela Paul's 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet felt like it should be interesting and thought-provoking, a little silly and a little profound. I LOVED her book, My Travels with Bob, about keeping track of all the books she read in a reading journal named Bob. But this? This was difficult. Every single topic - from "Boredom" to "Working Independently" to "Social Cues" and everything in between - feels like a harangue, a dire warning that we have lost far too much by giving our souls to the internet. Zennials don't know how to type. Our ability to have closure with anything has been ripped from us. People are taking our childhood pictures and selling them on the Dark Web. There were some fun and funny parts of this book, but basically it's the same diatribe over and over again: by connecting with everyone, you connect with no one, especially yourself. Nothing is real, everything is manufactured, and everything you ever loved will be stripped away. Certainly I agree with Paul on some of this stuff, and yes it's alarming that the internet has rendered some of our old practices obsolete so quickly. But the sort of moral panic and hectoring that crops up in so many of these entries feels a bit much for a book like this. Was it me? Was it the marketing? Was it the expectation? I thought it would be pithy and it just made me feel bad. Ironically, I found myself reading the entry about how we never read books in bed before sleep anymore in bed before sleep. I kind of regret reading this one and that's weird for me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Isabel

    "But, as the novelist Neil Gaiman put it, "Google can bring you back a hundred thousand answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one". "But, as the novelist Neil Gaiman put it, "Google can bring you back a hundred thousand answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one".

  11. 5 out of 5

    Milan

    '100 Things We've Lost to the Internet' by Pamela Paul contains 100 short essays some of them amusing, some insightful and some not that interesting. I skipped a few essays which felt too US-centric. I don't agree with the author on the few things that she says that we've lost, for example: bedtime reading, solitude, vacation, etc. But yes, we've lost quite a few things to the internet which people would rather call nostalgia, but were a part of life pre-internet days. I'm not surprised to know '100 Things We've Lost to the Internet' by Pamela Paul contains 100 short essays some of them amusing, some insightful and some not that interesting. I skipped a few essays which felt too US-centric. I don't agree with the author on the few things that she says that we've lost, for example: bedtime reading, solitude, vacation, etc. But yes, we've lost quite a few things to the internet which people would rather call nostalgia, but were a part of life pre-internet days. I'm not surprised to know that people share so much of their lives publicly, at least I don't. As she says, "Perhaps it’s we humans who have fallen behind the technology we created, we humans who find it hard to remember what we would like to remember, to hold on to it as something that belongs to us and us alone and keep it for ourselves. It’s we humans who are unable to forget the things we’ve lost and to let them go. It’s we who still wonder how to make these choices, when we still have them." Anything that we share on the internet stays there forever, whether we want it or not. There is no closure on the internet. She rightly says, "There is no blissful certainty that as you sail through life committing the typical human being’s battery of errors, misunderstandings, flubbed introductions, and inadvertently offensive remarks, nobody is entering them into the permanent record." Once something is shared, it goes out of your hand. " The Internet is unforgiving and unforgetting about even the most minor gaffe, the kind of thing that used to blow over by morning." People love to share their pictures and they let algorithms do the sorting for them but a very few realize that "This these companies do happily, because to them, each photo is a data point, helping improve their facial recognition technology, enhance their customer profiles, identify influencer relationships between consumers, and locate trends." A few memorable lines from the book: • You tend to lose the big picture when you’re seeing it only on a small screen. • Only offline do you find out what people truly think. • People demonstrably learn more when they put pencil to paper than when they swipe a screen. • On paper, you can cross things out when you’re done in a satisfying way that hitting delete doesn’t deliver. • To give someone a mixtape was a genuine act of courtship, devotion, or friendship, and now it’s gone. • While we are digitally present all the time, we are hardly ever fully present in the moment.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jt O'Neill

    I saw this reviewed somewhere and picked it up at the library. For me, it was an interesting, quick read. I like the way Pamela Paul takes a short look at 100 things that used to play a major role in our lives but now are gone or on the way out. As far as I'm, concerned, some of losses are fine. I don't care about losing the TV Guide, my checkbook, touch typing, or even figuring out who that actor is. Other losses are more painful - loss of eye contact, loss of civility. even loss of snail mail I saw this reviewed somewhere and picked it up at the library. For me, it was an interesting, quick read. I like the way Pamela Paul takes a short look at 100 things that used to play a major role in our lives but now are gone or on the way out. As far as I'm, concerned, some of losses are fine. I don't care about losing the TV Guide, my checkbook, touch typing, or even figuring out who that actor is. Other losses are more painful - loss of eye contact, loss of civility. even loss of snail mail birthday cards. Granted, not all losses are lost across the board. Ms Paul highlights the loss of photo albums but you can still do that. She cites loss of school libraries but I think the essence of school libraries can easily be preserved. She suggests that phone calls are lost but, in my experience, face time calls are even more connecting and valuable than old school phone calls. I believe that the internet has improved our lives in many ways. No doubt it has made connection easier. It has made research and knowledge more available for many. But it is useful to look at what has been lost. This book makes me wonder if human beings really know what has been lost with the arrival of the internet. Again, this is a light book but the meaning behind it is deeper to me. Ms Paul asks us to consider how the internet has affected our personal lives, our emotional selves. She throws out these 100 things but underneath that is a bigger question. Are we happy with the arrival of the internet? Are there things we want to preserve? I think it's wise to be open to change but to still have an awareness of what we both losing and gaining. This little book is a delightful beginning to that awareess.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This book was so sad. We have lost SO MUCH to the Internet. I miss most of the things Pamela Paul mentions. And now, here I am, writing on the Internet. I love to keep track of my books on Goodreads, but I still keep a written copy (something I have been doing since 1971). I do miss meeting people at workshops and conferences--everyone is looking down at a screen instead of at each other. I miss getting birthday cards and letters in the mail. I miss trying to remember what movie that actor was i This book was so sad. We have lost SO MUCH to the Internet. I miss most of the things Pamela Paul mentions. And now, here I am, writing on the Internet. I love to keep track of my books on Goodreads, but I still keep a written copy (something I have been doing since 1971). I do miss meeting people at workshops and conferences--everyone is looking down at a screen instead of at each other. I miss getting birthday cards and letters in the mail. I miss trying to remember what movie that actor was in or who wrote that book. I even miss cursive writing! I am sad that boys aren't reading much any more and that many schools no longer have libraries. I gave this book five stars, but I can't say that I really liked it. I guess future generations won't know what they missed. I feel sad for them.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sukrit

    A very starrey-eyed look on the things we've lost to the Internet, bordering on fogeyism. I agree with the author on big lifestyle changes that were probably "lost" to the Internet (e.g., boredom, creativity, being lost and finding new places, physical music collections), but some of the things we've "lost" I believe everyone was happy to get rid of! (e.g., living with the uncertainty of who an actor in a movie is, flipping through pages of encyclopedia to find information) A very starrey-eyed look on the things we've lost to the Internet, bordering on fogeyism. I agree with the author on big lifestyle changes that were probably "lost" to the Internet (e.g., boredom, creativity, being lost and finding new places, physical music collections), but some of the things we've "lost" I believe everyone was happy to get rid of! (e.g., living with the uncertainty of who an actor in a movie is, flipping through pages of encyclopedia to find information)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matt Schiavenza

    Pamela Paul’s collection of vignettes attempts to document what we’ve lost in the last 20 or so years to the internet, which — let’s be honest — has been a big disappointment. It’s a worthy subject of a book, and I suspect it won’t be the last of its kind. But its structure — 100 short essays about a range of subjects — undermines its potential and left me wanting more. Paul’s essays can be divided into two basic categories. The first are technologies that the internet has rendered obsolete, such Pamela Paul’s collection of vignettes attempts to document what we’ve lost in the last 20 or so years to the internet, which — let’s be honest — has been a big disappointment. It’s a worthy subject of a book, and I suspect it won’t be the last of its kind. But its structure — 100 short essays about a range of subjects — undermines its potential and left me wanting more. Paul’s essays can be divided into two basic categories. The first are technologies that the internet has rendered obsolete, such as Rolodexes and kitchen phones and paper maps. These items are remembered fondly, even if Paul acknowledges that the internet has made life far more convenient. The second category features more abstract concepts, like empathy, that social media has eroded, or sick days when one wasn’t expected to “keep an eye on” email or Slack. Is Paul’s book a nostalgic look at a bygone era or a searing examination of how the internet has cost us in ways we can’t quantify? The answer is both, or neither. I wish she had given us one or the other. There are other questions I wished Paul would have addressed, but didn’t. Is the problem the internet itself, or just social media? Are the items in her book truly lost or can they be restored again? I don’t want to criticize Paul for not writing the book I wished she wrote, but I do think this is a subject worth more critical examination. Humans love lists, and structuring a book as 100 short essays — most of which can be read on the toilet — is an easy sell to an attention-deprived audience. (Thanks, internet). But as charming and articulate as Paul is, this book feels like a swing and a miss.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Pamela Paul’s 100 Things We’ve Lost to the Internet is an amiable, browsable series of brief essays exploring, usually though not always with a pang of regret, those things and actions made obsolete by the internet, such as phone calls, paper maps, filing, and more. Or as she puts it in the introduction: “the things we achingly miss, the things we hardly knew existed, the things to which we can give a hard adios.” Paul also early on acknowledges that a number of these will be idiosyncratic losses Pamela Paul’s 100 Things We’ve Lost to the Internet is an amiable, browsable series of brief essays exploring, usually though not always with a pang of regret, those things and actions made obsolete by the internet, such as phone calls, paper maps, filing, and more. Or as she puts it in the introduction: “the things we achingly miss, the things we hardly knew existed, the things to which we can give a hard adios.” Paul also early on acknowledges that a number of these will be idiosyncratic losses, defined by her own background: her age, her socio-economic status, etc. She notes early on that “my own grievances reflect my experience as a Gen Xer … the priorities of a reader … the hopes and anxieties of a mother of three in New York.” She also quickly forestalls any charges that she is a luddite; she happily recognizes the many benefits of the web, and even, with regard to some of the lost objects/acts, bids them farewell with a cheery “good-riddance.” The pieces themselves are brief, a few a mere couple of sentences or paragraphs with most coming in at 2-3 pages and mostly covering just what one (at least one of a certain age range) would expect. Along with the above, that includes answering machines, getting lost, taking photographs, flea markets, old-style TV watching, etc. There’s a sense therefore of familiarity to a number of the pieces, and I found my favorites were the more unexpected ones, such as ignoring people or solo travel. Their tone is mostly light and light-hearted, whimsical at times, self-deprecating at moments, sometimes funny, other times sad. But the emotions are always moderate—never too high, never too low. The writing is always clear and precise, the voice engaging and conversational, the pieces reading almost as a cross between an informal blog and more formal essays. They mostly skim the surface, dipping a few times a bit deeper, but never for too long. I did at times find myself wishing for a bit more substance, a deeper dive into the ramifications of what was lost. But that’s clearly not Paul’s goal here so it can hardly be lodged as a writing critique, more a wistful “it would have been nice” desire, given just how smooth a writer she is. Because of that, and the similarity in tone and subject, I’d recommend it be read over several days/nights rather than straight or nearly straight through. And since there’s no grand arc, one can feel free to open up to whatever topic strikes their fancy. Well written, well covered if not exhaustive in terms of content, a welcome wry and observant voice. Recommended.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Devin Redmond

    3.5 stars I don’t know about this book 𝟷𝟶𝟶 𝘛𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘞𝘦’𝘷𝘦 𝘓𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘐𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘦𝘵. It made me feel really really sad. Kind of like the movie 𝘋𝘰𝘯’𝘵 𝘓𝘰𝘰𝘬 𝘜𝘱. ⁣ I think author Pamela Paul, editor of the NYT’s Book Review, makes a lot of sweeping generalizations. I didn’t agree with everything she wrote, but almost all of her sentences made me think. There were nostalgia items like the kitchen phone or the Rolodex…the loss of those aren’t what made me feel sad. It was more the big things: Boredom, Your Att 3.5 stars I don’t know about this book 𝟷𝟶𝟶 𝘛𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘞𝘦’𝘷𝘦 𝘓𝘰𝘴𝘵 𝘵𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘐𝘯𝘵𝘦𝘳𝘯𝘦𝘵. It made me feel really really sad. Kind of like the movie 𝘋𝘰𝘯’𝘵 𝘓𝘰𝘰𝘬 𝘜𝘱. ⁣ I think author Pamela Paul, editor of the NYT’s Book Review, makes a lot of sweeping generalizations. I didn’t agree with everything she wrote, but almost all of her sentences made me think. There were nostalgia items like the kitchen phone or the Rolodex…the loss of those aren’t what made me feel sad. It was more the big things: Boredom, Your Attention Span, The College Lecture, Uninhibitedness. It was the big idea chapters where she brought in important statistics, thus giving her words a little more weight. ⁣ There was also much in the book for educators to think about. I can’t decide if I need to dig my heels in about what I believe is right or just retire because I am old. I didn’t even know what “Stop the cap” meant today, and a group of 4th graders wouldn’t stop laughing at me about it. ⁣ : “One study that took a screen capture of college students’ laptops every five seconds found that students switch windows and tasks every nineteen seconds on average, all while in class.” ⁣ : “Remember what it was like when every trip was a series of things you’d never seen before, what it was like to see things only firsthand?” ⁣ : “In the end, the Internet may succeed in turning us all into reality TV characters - highlighting our best attributes, mugging with exaggeration to be certain the ‘audience’ catches on. Were we always this way, just without the means to telegraph it, or does the Internet turn us all into show-offs?” ⁣ : “The entire Internet is CliffsNotes.”⁣

  18. 5 out of 5

    A Yusuf

    Some v neat anecdotes and nostalgic pieces which made me miss our pre-Internet days, & definitely some eyebrows raised at some of the proclamations. As the title suggests, while the author does try to make the case for what's good about the Internet, most of the writing is biased against the www. Not that I'm complaining - and thanks to her own admission about her Luddite ways, but some experiences which are v euro- & white-centric definitely don't hold up. I also felt quite guilty reading this Some v neat anecdotes and nostalgic pieces which made me miss our pre-Internet days, & definitely some eyebrows raised at some of the proclamations. As the title suggests, while the author does try to make the case for what's good about the Internet, most of the writing is biased against the www. Not that I'm complaining - and thanks to her own admission about her Luddite ways, but some experiences which are v euro- & white-centric definitely don't hold up. I also felt quite guilty reading this book in its ebook format, silently turning the e-pages as she laments is the case with idiots like me, so I'm feeling a bit chastised about that. It also slightly worries me that some of my own nostalgic concerns and feelings mirror someone who is a few generations above me. I would actually really recommend this read to anyone who is an old soul, who has the time on a Sunday morning to just sit and reflect on the ways we were & what we've become - definitely owning a copy of this book in paper bc it's just that kind of read that makes you want to take that kind of time. Reading this book also made me realise that I've never been on a blind date in my life, which I now intend to intentionally change & experience at least once this year.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Thrasher

    I listened to this on Audible, and the narrator is very good. I also listen to Pamela Paul every week on the New York Times Book Review Podcast, and honestly, I wish Paul herself had narrated the book! Every person of a certain age who laments a bit (or a lot) for the past and who is suspicious of technology always starts out their jeremiad with “I’m not Luddite, but…”. I’m not an exception, and quite frankly, neither is Paul (I’ve heard her say this). But she makes a great case here that the In I listened to this on Audible, and the narrator is very good. I also listen to Pamela Paul every week on the New York Times Book Review Podcast, and honestly, I wish Paul herself had narrated the book! Every person of a certain age who laments a bit (or a lot) for the past and who is suspicious of technology always starts out their jeremiad with “I’m not Luddite, but…”. I’m not an exception, and quite frankly, neither is Paul (I’ve heard her say this). But she makes a great case here that the Internet is some of Frankenstein’s necessary evil monster. The Internet has done much good, and also done much bad, and Paul sometimes humorously, sometimes sadly, and occasionally bitterly, explores this dichotomy. Really: how can something so good for Us, be so damn bad for Us at the same time? And yet, here we are. Truly, Paul is not a Luddite (and neither am I) and she makes a great case for some things the Internet has successfully replaced - but mostly, this is a lament (although a witty one) on a past that will never be again, and a foreboding sense of “What the hell have we done to ourselves.”

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    Remember when TV was just a TV? If you missed a show, that was it! This delightfully written and wonderfully illustrated guide to all things pre-internet is a great conversation started for people on either side—or kind of in the middle—of a wholly digital world. Pamela Paul is the NY Times Book Review editor. She brilliantly captured something we’ve all barely noticed has gone by: life before the internet. Remember when car keys were actual keys? Remember going to movie theaters without phones Remember when TV was just a TV? If you missed a show, that was it! This delightfully written and wonderfully illustrated guide to all things pre-internet is a great conversation started for people on either side—or kind of in the middle—of a wholly digital world. Pamela Paul is the NY Times Book Review editor. She brilliantly captured something we’ve all barely noticed has gone by: life before the internet. Remember when car keys were actual keys? Remember going to movie theaters without phones lighting up in the dark? And do you remember calling people, and if nobody answered, you left a message or called back? (For younger listeners of this podcast, yes, there was a time of home answering machines). The genius of this book was that it was an excellent read for me, but I think it will be an interesting read for any generation, especially people who have grown up as digital natives. To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/pam...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I really enjoyed this book because it really made me how much has changed since the Internet came into our lives. This book goes through 100 different objects or ideas that have been changed by the Internet and it really helps one to take a good introspective look at our own lives and how technology has changed it in a lot of negative ways. There were some points that I shared with friends that they didn't agree with, but I think the author did a solid job of laying out her reasonings as to why I really enjoyed this book because it really made me how much has changed since the Internet came into our lives. This book goes through 100 different objects or ideas that have been changed by the Internet and it really helps one to take a good introspective look at our own lives and how technology has changed it in a lot of negative ways. There were some points that I shared with friends that they didn't agree with, but I think the author did a solid job of laying out her reasonings as to why we lost said things and it made for an engaging and interesting read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Willow

    Come mothers and fathers Throughout the land And don't criticize What you can't understand Your sons and your daughters Are beyond your command Your old road is rapidly agin' Please get out of the new one If you can't lend your hand For the times they are a-changin' The line it is drawn The curse it is cast The slow one now Will later be fast As the present now Will later be past The order is rapidly fadin' And the first one now Will later be last For the times they are a-changin' (This review brought to you by Bob Come mothers and fathers Throughout the land And don't criticize What you can't understand Your sons and your daughters Are beyond your command Your old road is rapidly agin' Please get out of the new one If you can't lend your hand For the times they are a-changin' The line it is drawn The curse it is cast The slow one now Will later be fast As the present now Will later be past The order is rapidly fadin' And the first one now Will later be last For the times they are a-changin' (This review brought to you by Bob Dylan)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Laila

    This irritated me. We didn’t “lose” birthday cards, Christmas cards, bedside reading, record albums, movie theaters, etc. You can still choose to experience those things! No, we don’t have marathon phone call sessions on the one corded family phone anymore, trying to drag the phone as far away as the cord will stretch. But that’s okay. I don’t know, I guess I wanted this to be deeper and more philosophical.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cher

    Fun read for those of us old enough to remember not only pre-internet days but the days before personal computers. I feel as though it explains more how things have changed than things that are totally lost, although her observations are often so true (lol I used an online thesaurus to find a word). Fun and thought-provoking.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    I saw a review of this book in the paper and figured that I'd see what we've lost. Most of the list you probably already know (bad photos, losing a ticket, family meals, forgetting birthdays). The book gives the item and then a 1-2 page description of each. My advice would be to look at the table of contents and only read the chapters of interest to you. I saw a review of this book in the paper and figured that I'd see what we've lost. Most of the list you probably already know (bad photos, losing a ticket, family meals, forgetting birthdays). The book gives the item and then a 1-2 page description of each. My advice would be to look at the table of contents and only read the chapters of interest to you.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Donna Newman

    I quite enjoyed this for a bit of nostalgia. The author clearly feels that everything used to be better before the internet. I can’t say I completely agree but some things definitely were! This book is only really applicable if you’re over 35, otherwise it won’t resonate. Also, some of the 100 things would only apply in the US.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    A book that makes sense! We have lost so much to the web. I would be fine with going back to the 80s.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marisa Gettas

    DNF at 11% — I'm needing something to listen to as my pain treatment is wearing off, and eye-reading is challenging. I didn’t enjoy the narration and the content wasn’t grabbing me. DNF at 11% — I'm needing something to listen to as my pain treatment is wearing off, and eye-reading is challenging. I didn’t enjoy the narration and the content wasn’t grabbing me.

  29. 4 out of 5

    JD Mitchell

    Listened to this as an audiobook, mostly on walks and drives. Some of the 100 were funny and nostalgic and others were a little depressing. Not all of the ideas were very original but I thought the essays were well written.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I mostly read this book while the internet was off at school- amusingly enough. I enjoy the NY Times Book Podcast so much that I picked up this book. The illustrations are a delight, and the tone is cranky, but friendly. A quick and enjoyable read- but not held together in a particularly meaningful way. I found myself reading without remembering much.

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