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Piece by Piece: The Story of Nisrin's Hijab

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In this middle-grade graphic novel, Nisrin will have to rely on faith, friends, and family to help her recover after she is the target of a hate crime Nisrin is a 13-year-old Bangladeshi-American girl living in Milwaukie, Oregon, in 2002. As she nears the end of eighth grade, she gives a presentation for World Culture Day about Bangladesh while wearing a traditional cultur In this middle-grade graphic novel, Nisrin will have to rely on faith, friends, and family to help her recover after she is the target of a hate crime Nisrin is a 13-year-old Bangladeshi-American girl living in Milwaukie, Oregon, in 2002. As she nears the end of eighth grade, she gives a presentation for World Culture Day about Bangladesh while wearing a traditional cultural dress. On her way home, she is the victim of a hate crime when a man violently attacks her for wearing a headscarf. Deeply traumatized by the experience, Nisrin spends the summer depressed and isolated. Other than weekly therapy, Nisrin doesn’t leave the house until fall arrives and it’s time for her to start freshman year at a new school. The night before class starts, Nisrin makes a decision. She tells her family she’s going to start wearing hijab, much to their dismay. Her mother and grandparent’s shocked and angry reactions confuse her—but they only strengthen her resolve. This choice puts Nisrin on a path to not only discover more about Islam, but also her family’s complicated relationship with the religion, and the reasons they left Bangladesh in the first place. On top of everything else, she’s struggling to fit in at school—her hijab makes her a target for students and faculty alike. But with the help from old friends and new, Nisrin is starting to figure out what really makes her happy. Piece by Piece is an original graphic novel about growing up and choosing your own path, even if it leads you to a different place than you expected.


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In this middle-grade graphic novel, Nisrin will have to rely on faith, friends, and family to help her recover after she is the target of a hate crime Nisrin is a 13-year-old Bangladeshi-American girl living in Milwaukie, Oregon, in 2002. As she nears the end of eighth grade, she gives a presentation for World Culture Day about Bangladesh while wearing a traditional cultur In this middle-grade graphic novel, Nisrin will have to rely on faith, friends, and family to help her recover after she is the target of a hate crime Nisrin is a 13-year-old Bangladeshi-American girl living in Milwaukie, Oregon, in 2002. As she nears the end of eighth grade, she gives a presentation for World Culture Day about Bangladesh while wearing a traditional cultural dress. On her way home, she is the victim of a hate crime when a man violently attacks her for wearing a headscarf. Deeply traumatized by the experience, Nisrin spends the summer depressed and isolated. Other than weekly therapy, Nisrin doesn’t leave the house until fall arrives and it’s time for her to start freshman year at a new school. The night before class starts, Nisrin makes a decision. She tells her family she’s going to start wearing hijab, much to their dismay. Her mother and grandparent’s shocked and angry reactions confuse her—but they only strengthen her resolve. This choice puts Nisrin on a path to not only discover more about Islam, but also her family’s complicated relationship with the religion, and the reasons they left Bangladesh in the first place. On top of everything else, she’s struggling to fit in at school—her hijab makes her a target for students and faculty alike. But with the help from old friends and new, Nisrin is starting to figure out what really makes her happy. Piece by Piece is an original graphic novel about growing up and choosing your own path, even if it leads you to a different place than you expected.

30 review for Piece by Piece: The Story of Nisrin's Hijab

  1. 4 out of 5

    Adiba Jaigirdar

    Definitely one of my new favourite books ever! This was just so beautiful and made me super emotional. Cannot recommend it highly enough.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    I randomly decided to pick this one up after I saw it at the library and it did not disappoint. The story and the artwork are definitely worth checking out. Piece by Piece is the story of Nisrin and how she adjusts to life after a heinous hate crime. After presenting to her class on Bangladesh, Nisrin is walking home putting a scarf over her head when a man decides to rip it off and takes a great portion of her hair with it. As a result, Nisrin deals with a lot trauma during her recovery. When sh I randomly decided to pick this one up after I saw it at the library and it did not disappoint. The story and the artwork are definitely worth checking out. Piece by Piece is the story of Nisrin and how she adjusts to life after a heinous hate crime. After presenting to her class on Bangladesh, Nisrin is walking home putting a scarf over her head when a man decides to rip it off and takes a great portion of her hair with it. As a result, Nisrin deals with a lot trauma during her recovery. When she sees her cousin wearing a Hijab she makes the decision to also begin wearing one against the wishes of her grandfather. Throughout the story readers get the opportunity to see Nisrin navigate societal reactions to her wearing a Hijab. While trying to make new friends, she struggles to repair the relationship with the same friend who witnessed her getting attacked. One of my favorite parts of this graphic novel was not only the history that readers get on the complicated relationship between Bangladesh and Pakistan, but also the art. The art is absolutely beautiful. Huq mainly uses water colors which is evident in every single frame, but the colors are rich and deep. There are panels where no words are used and the art definitely evokes the emotions of the characters. It's just a beautiful graphic novel albeit sad in a lot of ways because of the Islamophobia. Definitely check this one out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fanna

    March 09, 2021: "a 13-year-old girl who was viciously attacked for her Bangladeshi cultural dress, chooses to wear a hijab when she begins high school" ↦ expecting an emotional middle-grade; March 09, 2021: "a 13-year-old girl who was viciously attacked for her Bangladeshi cultural dress, chooses to wear a hijab when she begins high school" ↦ expecting an emotional middle-grade;

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kirin

    At 224 pages, this graphic novel tells an important OWN voice story in beautiful and powerful illustrations, but despite reading it multiple times, I ultimately found the pacing a bit off, the narrative and plot holes quite large, and the conclusion too forced.  It claims to be for middle grades which would explain the happy ending, but the assault, trauma, mental health, Bengali history, language, and protagonists age (13) I think make it more suited for upper middle school.  I read a digital A At 224 pages, this graphic novel tells an important OWN voice story in beautiful and powerful illustrations, but despite reading it multiple times, I ultimately found the pacing a bit off, the narrative and plot holes quite large, and the conclusion too forced.  It claims to be for middle grades which would explain the happy ending, but the assault, trauma, mental health, Bengali history, language, and protagonists age (13) I think make it more suited for upper middle school.  I read a digital ARC in predominately black and white images, so I'm hopeful that part of the problem is on me, and that I simply missed or misunderstood parts that seemed to jump around and assume, or that because it was an uncorrected proof, some revision is still to come. SYNOPSIS: Nisrin is 13 and lives in Oregon with her mother, and maternal grandparents.  Her mom travels a lot and she seems to spend most of her time with her loving Nani, grandmother.  The story opens with Nisrin in 8th grade giving a presentation about her Bangladeshi heritage to her school.  On the way home with a friend, Firuzeh, she is still wearing the cultural clothing and they are playing around with the scarf, when they are violently attacked and the scarf is ripped off of Nisrin's head.  Her hair is pulled out in the process and the two girls are taken to the hospital and when released maintain professional counseling to process and deal with the assault.  Nisrin fears leaving her house and is increasingly isolated within her home.   Over the summer we see her and her Nani go over to some cousin's house where Nasrin is gawked at with her short hair and everyone is unsure how to act around her.  She joins some cousins playing video games where she asks about a cousin in hijab who says that it is essentially her choice between her and Allah (swt), that it isn't any one else's business.  A younger cousin tells that she plans to start hijab soon and is surprised to learn that Nisrin's mom is not Muslim.  As summer comes to an end, Nisrin will be starting high school and exits her room the night before wearing a hijab, or in Bengali, an orna.  Her family freaks out, her Nana, maternal grandfather, is furious claiming that she should have been raised better, and Nisrin is scooted off to her room by her Nani, so that her mom and grandfather can argue. On the first day of school, Nisrin tries to talk to Firuzeh, but once again things are awkward between the two girls.  A teacher refuses to try and say Nisrin's name and becomes angry and aggressive, and at PE she is called a slut and asked if she will be beat for showing her legs.  Nisrin goes home to research Islam and hijab, but everything is so angry and opinion based that she is more confused than when she started. The next day she meets a nice girl, Veronica, and the two work on an assignment in class and then have lunch together.  Veronica suggests that Nisrin learns about Islam like she would a school assignment and go research it at the library.  Later at home, Nisrin starts to understand what her grandparents and mother saw and endured in the war of 1971 when Bangladesh became independent from Pakistan.  Her mom and Nana argue over what was seen and Nisrin starts to find her voice in her family.   Nani takes Nisrin shopping for long sleeved clothes and scarves, things are worked out with Firuzeh and Nisrin's family accepts that Nisrin is not asking permission to wear her scarf, but is hoping they will accept it.   WHY I LIKE IT: The book is such a flip on the over-used-stereotype that Muslim girls are forced to wear hijab, in truth many are encouraged not to.  At one point Nisrin says, "If I can't be safe...then can't I at least be proud."  She was attacked for just playing with a scarf and putting it on her head, so she reasons, that there is not safety from racism and hate, she might as well be proud of who she is.  I also love the strength in the idea that she doesn't need anyone's permission, it is her faith, her head, her choice.   There is a lot of good in the book, but I struggled understanding quite a bit of it.  It mentions that she was at Texas and she loved it, but there was bullying? No idea what it was in reference to or what purpose it served.  At the beginning the two girls seem like they have been friends for a while, but yet Nisrin warns Firuzeh that her Nani will force her to eat.  Nisrin seems to really love her sleep overs, and I don't know if it is just to show at the end the healing by coming full circle, but it seems a bit juvenile to be that excited about to me. The family dynamic and history, left me very confused.  Nisrin doesn't know her cousin wears hijab, and is confused that her aunt doesn't.  Nor do her cousins know that Nisrin's mom isn't Muslim?  These cousins call Nisrin's Nani, Dadi, and since there is no father in the picture it is obvious to even none desi folk that these cousins are related through the mom's family and the cousins father, so why when Nisrin decides to wear hijab is the maternal side so upset? Why does Nasrin's mom ask if her cousins have put her up to it? Ok if the mom isn't religious, but does she actively practice another faith? Why in one of the portraits on the wall does the woman seem to have a bindhi? The Bangladesh independence admittedly is something I should know more about, but I don't, and this book, didn't really fill me in.  How is the grandfather both siding? He doesn't like invader nationalism, but I still don't completely understand why he left, and what that solved. The pacing and tone at times are off too me too.   I didn't feel the strain on Nisrin and Firuzeh's relationship, the text suggests that they are and were best friends, but when Veronica asks if Nisrin's stress is in part to the cute girl she was staring down, I was curious too if there was more to their relationship.  A lot seems to happen between the attack and Nisrin starting to wear hijab and I wish we were allowed inside Nisrin's head to know how she feels about her mom, her nana, starting high school, her attack, her desire to wear hijab, it seems a bit rushed.  Which is odd since, the story spends a few pages detailing when Nisrin feels like everyone hates her after Nani picks her up on the first day of school and Nani points out that not everyone hates her, the squirrels don't, and the dogs don't, etc..  It seems really childish for the incredible ordeal she has been through. I like the informative section at the end about Bangledesh. I wish the book would have shared some of what Nisrin learned about Islam in her own research, she goes to the mosque, but doesn't detail if she plans to pray regularly, fast, etc.. FLAGS: Language, violence, war imagery, rape mentioned, assault. TOOLS FOR LEADING THE DISCUSSION: I don't know that this would work for a middle school book club at an Islamic School, graphic novels are often to quick of reads, but I have a few friends from Bangladesh and I really want them, and their daughters, to read it and clue me in to what I am missing, their view of independence and their impression of the book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sakina (aforestofbooks)

    This was a really heartwarming read. Nisrin’s story is very different from my own, but there were many parts that were still relatable. I also liked how we learned a little more about the history of Bangladesh at the end. I honestly didn’t know anything about Bangladesh so this was very eye-opening for me and also makes me sad because this is the kind of stuff I wish we were taught in school.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Nisrin is attacked for wearing an hijab, while coming home one day from middle school. The thing is, at that point, she was just wearing it to show how it looked. She had not considered wearing it daily at that point. In the summer she takes to recover, she realizes that she wants to start wearing sit full time, and discovers that her teacher, and her classmates hate her for it, and prejudge her, and treat her poorly, and yet, she persists. Even her mother and grandparents do not understand why s Nisrin is attacked for wearing an hijab, while coming home one day from middle school. The thing is, at that point, she was just wearing it to show how it looked. She had not considered wearing it daily at that point. In the summer she takes to recover, she realizes that she wants to start wearing sit full time, and discovers that her teacher, and her classmates hate her for it, and prejudge her, and treat her poorly, and yet, she persists. Even her mother and grandparents do not understand why she would want to wear it. But in talking to her cousins, and in reasearching Islam, she realizes that she feels closer to god, and so continues, no matter how much hate she gets. This is a heart breaking story, not the author’s story, but she says she relates to a lot of it. Good book to show the other side, from the standard white male point of view. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of Piece by Piece: The Story of Nisrin's Hijab in exchange for an honest review. This graphic novel was so much more than I thought it would be. After Nisrin is the victim of a hate crime, she starts reflecting on her relationship with religion and why she and her mother don't wear hijabs. Instead of living consumed by the fear of what happened, Nisrin instead becomes inspired to learn more about her family and their background and this graphic novel Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of Piece by Piece: The Story of Nisrin's Hijab in exchange for an honest review. This graphic novel was so much more than I thought it would be. After Nisrin is the victim of a hate crime, she starts reflecting on her relationship with religion and why she and her mother don't wear hijabs. Instead of living consumed by the fear of what happened, Nisrin instead becomes inspired to learn more about her family and their background and this graphic novel chronical her learning, the reactions of those around her, and how she reacts to those reactions. All the characters in this (especially Nisrin's family) were really nuanced and realistic which is normally something that's extremely difficult to do in middle grade. This story goes a lot deeper than it had to and it does an excellent job.

  8. 5 out of 5

    grieshaber.reads

    The artwork in this graphic novel is absolutely stunning. The vibrant watercolors and dramatic facial expressions really help tell this story. Artist and author Priya Huq wanted to tell a story for young people showing what life was like for a girl like her, coming of age in a post-9/11 world so she set the action in 2002. The story begins with a terrifying event. Nisrin wore a headscarf to school for World Cultures Day where she spoke about her family’s home country - Bangladesh. As she and her The artwork in this graphic novel is absolutely stunning. The vibrant watercolors and dramatic facial expressions really help tell this story. Artist and author Priya Huq wanted to tell a story for young people showing what life was like for a girl like her, coming of age in a post-9/11 world so she set the action in 2002. The story begins with a terrifying event. Nisrin wore a headscarf to school for World Cultures Day where she spoke about her family’s home country - Bangladesh. As she and her best friend are walking home, they are attacked by a white supremacist and both girls are forever changed. They each deal with their trauma differently. Nisrin decides to wear the hijab as she begins ninth grade. For her, it is a symbol of pride, resilience, and resistance. She knows she’ll receive ridicule but she’s determined to stay strong. Piece by Piece details Nisrin’s journey, which includes revelations about her family’s life in Bangladesh and the political turmoil they endured in addition to living with PTSD and adjusting to attending high school under an unwanted spotlight. As usual when I read a “window” book, I learned so much about the hijab (I had no idea it wasn’t only worn for religious reasons) and I gained even more empathy for those teens who travel a path different from the majority. Piece by Piece has a release date of November 16, 2021. For now, add it to your TBR. And if you’re a middle school or high school librarian, plan on adding it to your collection. Take a look at this article for a preview: https://www.yesmagazine.org/social-ju... I can’t wait to put this in the hands of a group of hijab-wearing girls who frequent the library. They’re going to love it!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kai Charles(Fiction State Of Mind)

    A beautifully written story about the struggles of a young girl after she is involved in a hate crime attack.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Gillman

    Gorgeous watercolors, and some wonderful uses of the comics medium to visually discuss navigating intergenerational trauma. I hope this becomes a staple on library bookshelves.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Maryam Mallick

    What makes this book different from all others? And why should anyone care? I am not sure what to say about this book. it not an inspirational book for sure. I didn't get moved by it. I felt like the story was done in a rush, Country history, religion and friendship. if the author kept with the MC and best friend incident, then we might see some story. Also the illustration seems confusing the emotion shows seems scary to me maybe that what the artist is going for and also maybe the NetGalley cop What makes this book different from all others? And why should anyone care? I am not sure what to say about this book. it not an inspirational book for sure. I didn't get moved by it. I felt like the story was done in a rush, Country history, religion and friendship. if the author kept with the MC and best friend incident, then we might see some story. Also the illustration seems confusing the emotion shows seems scary to me maybe that what the artist is going for and also maybe the NetGalley copy I received was not good and it was black in white print and also even the text box was so hard to read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Parker

    This graphic novel goes over the intricacies of a young girl, Nisrin, deciding to wear a hijab. I liked how this focused on the internal politics of Nisrin's family in addition to the prejudice she faces from people at school and in the world at large. It provided a nuanced look at an issue that is frequently presented as black and white. Read in prepub through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This graphic novel goes over the intricacies of a young girl, Nisrin, deciding to wear a hijab. I liked how this focused on the internal politics of Nisrin's family in addition to the prejudice she faces from people at school and in the world at large. It provided a nuanced look at an issue that is frequently presented as black and white. Read in prepub through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shifa S

    ⭐️Warning: Islamaphobia triggers/read screening Genre: Graphic Novel Ages: I would suggest ages older than 13 Available: Amazon Screening: Islamaphobia- the main character gets her hijab ripped off and her hair comes off her scalp, blood everywhere. Lots of cussing in the book. Hints at Main character liking her friend though nothing explicit. Trauma/bullying. Rape mentioned but not shown Nisreen is a young Bangladeshi girl living with her mother, (her father is not mentioned at all and it is said he ⭐️Warning: Islamaphobia triggers/read screening Genre: Graphic Novel Ages: I would suggest ages older than 13 Available: Amazon Screening: Islamaphobia- the main character gets her hijab ripped off and her hair comes off her scalp, blood everywhere. Lots of cussing in the book. Hints at Main character liking her friend though nothing explicit. Trauma/bullying. Rape mentioned but not shown Nisreen is a young Bangladeshi girl living with her mother, (her father is not mentioned at all and it is said her Mom isn’t marriad) and her mom’s parents. She wears an orna (cultural hijab cover) to school for a culture presentation and on the way home she and her best friend are attacked, and her orna is pulled off and the top half of her hair is violently ripped off. The summer is spent in therapy and the only time she leaves her home is to visit her cousins who wear hijab. On the first day of school, Nisreen decides to wear hijab. Her grandfather is furious and her mom and him fight. Nisreen is upset, but heads to school in short sleeves and hijab. When someone calls her out for wearing shorts in school, she realizes she doesn’t know how to wear hijab properly and decides to do research. A new friend helps her, as her best friend has remained distant…and Nisreen slowly grows in her confidence about her hijab. I liked how Nisreen was determined to wear hijab, and she researches Islam to learn, even though her mother and grandmother don’t, and her grandfather is mad about it. I like how Islamaphobia and racism are discussed, and even through the triggers, there is a lot to learn. Nisreen encounters judgement about wearing hijab and false info online is shown to the reader- further clarifying that there is so much misinformation about hijab on the internet. The reason Nisreen’s family is triggered by her hijab is the Pakistani/Bangladesh war and mentions are made of Nisreen’s mother being scared while wearing an orna and her grandparent’s experiences of brutality from Pakistani soldiers and fear of the rape squads. Some politics are discussed, but not too much detail- just enough to show trauma, although I never really get a full handle on what really happened. Def an intense read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    After a cultural awareness program at her school, eighth-grader Nisrin and her best friend Firuzeh are victims of a hate crime because Nisrin is wearing an orna. The head scarf has little significance to Nisrin at the time since she used it for her presentation about Bangladesh, where her family originally lived before moving to the Portland, Oregon, area. She spends the summer feeling depressed and traumatizing and going to therapy. After hanging out with some cousins, one of whom wears the hij After a cultural awareness program at her school, eighth-grader Nisrin and her best friend Firuzeh are victims of a hate crime because Nisrin is wearing an orna. The head scarf has little significance to Nisrin at the time since she used it for her presentation about Bangladesh, where her family originally lived before moving to the Portland, Oregon, area. She spends the summer feeling depressed and traumatizing and going to therapy. After hanging out with some cousins, one of whom wears the hijab, Nisrin decides to wear it too as she begins the academic year at a new school. Her family is confused by her decision since it seems to draw unwanted attention and bullying and sets her apart from her classmates. Nisrin knows little about the significance of the hijab or her grandfather's hatred toward it or what it stands for. Plus, she's confused about how Firuzeh is ignoring her at school. When a gifted science student named Veronica reaches out to Nisrin, she finds comfort and acceptance in her presence, which helps make school a little more tolerable, while at home, her maternal grandmother provides solace and understanding. Even her grandfather eventually shares the reasons behind his hatred of the hijab, and she learns what prompted her family to leave their homeland. Although some of the images are hard to understand, most of them will affect readers' deeply, making this an important book about trauma, healing, and hope. I knew very little about the origins and history of Bangladesh, which is probably the case for many other readers. This graphic novel made me curious to learn more. It probably goes without saying, but I'll say it anyway: The text and images capture Nisrin's experiences, feelings, and thoughts, and words quite well. Reading it felt like being inside the life of fourteen-year-old girl.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aidan

    Piece by Piece: The Story of Nisrin’s Hijab is about a Bangladeshi-American girl named Nisrin in the early 2000s after the events of 9/11. For a school project one day, Nisrin was wearing an orna (Bangladeshi headscarf). While walking home with a friend, a man screamed obscenities at them and ripped off Nisrin’s headscarf. The graphic novel then focuses on her PTSD, demonstrating its manifestation with trippy graphics and unorganized pieces of time. Throughout the book, Huq shows how Nisrin deal Piece by Piece: The Story of Nisrin’s Hijab is about a Bangladeshi-American girl named Nisrin in the early 2000s after the events of 9/11. For a school project one day, Nisrin was wearing an orna (Bangladeshi headscarf). While walking home with a friend, a man screamed obscenities at them and ripped off Nisrin’s headscarf. The graphic novel then focuses on her PTSD, demonstrating its manifestation with trippy graphics and unorganized pieces of time. Throughout the book, Huq shows how Nisrin deals with PTSD and how it affects the people around her. She is able to resurface from her shell while being empowered by wearing a hijab to her school. There she faces even more discrimination, but she stands tall, proud, and strong. The story surprised me. I must not have read the description well enough because I wasn’t aware of its focus on PTSD. The art style is unfamiliar to me, but not unpleasant. The digital copy I read was unfortunately of poor quality, with the words being difficult to read at times. I did enjoy that some of the wording was written in Bangla (the language of Bangladesh). This graphic novel does a wonderful job of opening up discussion about PTSD, Islam, racism, prejudice, and friends. I highly recommend reading it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    With graphic novel ARCs, it’s hard to pinpoint what issues will be fixed with the final version - BW vs color, text boxes, etc. I’ll try my best to review in good faith of the finished product, Nisrin’s story is important and compelling. I liked that we see her journey with the hijab, first as a cultural heritage “costume,” then trying to be hijabi but frustrated that her family never taught her the expectations such as wearing long sleeves and pants, then finding support and committing to attend With graphic novel ARCs, it’s hard to pinpoint what issues will be fixed with the final version - BW vs color, text boxes, etc. I’ll try my best to review in good faith of the finished product, Nisrin’s story is important and compelling. I liked that we see her journey with the hijab, first as a cultural heritage “costume,” then trying to be hijabi but frustrated that her family never taught her the expectations such as wearing long sleeves and pants, then finding support and committing to attending mosque and learning Islam. It’s hard to fully cover multiple plot threads in the graphic novel format. The time-lapse from the attack to the hospital to therapy to school starting again felt rushed. I wish there was more time to explore her Black friend’s trauma from the hate crime; the teacher’s casual racism; her family’s relationship with Islam. Sometimes the transitions between these beats were confusing, and I’m not sure how much of that will be resolved with a polished publication. Finally, it made me smile to see the details that grounded this story firmly in 2002: the flip phones and phone charms, the mix cds, the flare jeans…very cute, though I think this story could easily have been set in modern day.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from ABRAMS Kids through NetGalley. Readers see Nisrin struggle to figure out who she is in connection to her faith. She and her best friend are attacked due to the way they looked early in the book. Nisrin's Bangladeshi attire triggered a hate crime by some stranger on the street. Both girls ended up with physical as well as emotional damage. The remainder of the story looks at how Nisrin copes with what happened and her family's reaction to this. They a Graphic Novel I received an electronic ARC from ABRAMS Kids through NetGalley. Readers see Nisrin struggle to figure out who she is in connection to her faith. She and her best friend are attacked due to the way they looked early in the book. Nisrin's Bangladeshi attire triggered a hate crime by some stranger on the street. Both girls ended up with physical as well as emotional damage. The remainder of the story looks at how Nisrin copes with what happened and her family's reaction to this. They are immigrants from Bangladesh and escaped during the genocide that took place in the 1970's so face their own memories of that time. Readers see Nisrin work to decide about wearing the hijab as she begins high school. She discovers hate and distrust come in all sorts of ways from teachers and classmates. It's heartbreaking to realize how many young women face this as they figure out who they are. Huq captures the pain and the blossoming joy as she finds friends and owns her choices. A terrific Own Voice novel that pulls readers in. The informative text included at the end offers further insight into Bangladeshi history. The artwork is stunning and creates the entire world for readers to step into. Trigger: Violence against women and minorities.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I'm not usually a fan of graphic novels, but this one is beautifully done. It conveys some very strong emotions as a young girl begins to question her family's Muslim background, and decides to wear a headscarf, not anticipating the consequences. Nisrin has cousins who are observant and wear hijab, but her own family do not, so her decision causes conflict at home. It also leads to a vicious attack in public and varied reactions from teachers and other students, but it also provides her the oppo I'm not usually a fan of graphic novels, but this one is beautifully done. It conveys some very strong emotions as a young girl begins to question her family's Muslim background, and decides to wear a headscarf, not anticipating the consequences. Nisrin has cousins who are observant and wear hijab, but her own family do not, so her decision causes conflict at home. It also leads to a vicious attack in public and varied reactions from teachers and other students, but it also provides her the opportunity to learn more about why her mother and grandparents left Bangladesh. This is a stirring novel, and although Nisrin struggles to articulate her reasons for wearing hijab, she is a hero to root for as she follows through on her decision.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nabil Hussain

    Stunning debut graphic novel about a Bangladeshi American girl in today's society. This book is elegantly composed and well laid out. The story moves at an energetic pace. The artwork was very colourful and was excellent. It was of a high standard. I enjoyed the book as a British Bangladeshi but I do feel that readers from other geographical backgrounds will appreciate this book greatly and understand all the nuances of this story. Nisrin's plight can be understood profoundy by all these other re Stunning debut graphic novel about a Bangladeshi American girl in today's society. This book is elegantly composed and well laid out. The story moves at an energetic pace. The artwork was very colourful and was excellent. It was of a high standard. I enjoyed the book as a British Bangladeshi but I do feel that readers from other geographical backgrounds will appreciate this book greatly and understand all the nuances of this story. Nisrin's plight can be understood profoundy by all these other readers. The story was original and innovative. It is a fantastic book along with the glossary and other important facts of the nation of Bangladesh. Well done, Priya Huq!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Destiny

    While the pacing was a bit erratic and some plot points did not get developed well (like, the fallout between Nisrin and Firuzeh), I thought this was good. The artwork was also super cute! After an Islamophobic attack where her headscarf is violently ripped off, Nisrin begins diving deeply into Islam. But she has a hard, messy time learning about Islam and hijabs in general due to her family upbringing. I thought the story conveyed the serious issues in a digestible way for younger readers well. While the pacing was a bit erratic and some plot points did not get developed well (like, the fallout between Nisrin and Firuzeh), I thought this was good. The artwork was also super cute! After an Islamophobic attack where her headscarf is violently ripped off, Nisrin begins diving deeply into Islam. But she has a hard, messy time learning about Islam and hijabs in general due to her family upbringing. I thought the story conveyed the serious issues in a digestible way for younger readers well. There’s mention of the history of Bangladesh’s civil war and how it affected her family and her mother’s aversion to Islam and headcovering. Overall, worth reading. 3.75

  21. 5 out of 5

    KATHRYNE STEVENS

    I was a huge fan of this graphic novel. Colors are very purposefully used to convey emotions, along with very detailed illustrations. The story focuses on some of Priya's own experiences and acts as a great window into the lives of Bangladeshi Americans. I was most impressed with the information at the end. Priya breaks down some major facts and history about Bangladesh and offers an afterward about her own experiences. Overall I learned a lot and thought it was a novel that dealt beautifully wi I was a huge fan of this graphic novel. Colors are very purposefully used to convey emotions, along with very detailed illustrations. The story focuses on some of Priya's own experiences and acts as a great window into the lives of Bangladeshi Americans. I was most impressed with the information at the end. Priya breaks down some major facts and history about Bangladesh and offers an afterward about her own experiences. Overall I learned a lot and thought it was a novel that dealt beautifully with trauma and the idea of coming into your own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sonya Thompson

    I am not reviewing the book for the story; there are plenty of reviews for that already. I do use Goodreads often to see if books are appropriate for a middle school. I purchased the book and had a 7th grader return the book because of the language. The language is usually in symbols like $#%@, but you can determine the intended word. Further on, the language is more obvious like G*DD*MN and FU**ING with symbols but definitely discernible. I specifically read reviews prior to purchasing and none I am not reviewing the book for the story; there are plenty of reviews for that already. I do use Goodreads often to see if books are appropriate for a middle school. I purchased the book and had a 7th grader return the book because of the language. The language is usually in symbols like $#%@, but you can determine the intended word. Further on, the language is more obvious like G*DD*MN and FU**ING with symbols but definitely discernible. I specifically read reviews prior to purchasing and none mentioned language. I'm neither recommending nor vetoing it, but I did want a review to mention the language in case that's a concern.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    Quite gripping story and impressive debut graphic novel about the courage it takes to find yourself as a young teen, especially when society makes your choices a swim against the tide. Drawn complete with full color illustrations; while some fail, others simply take your breath away. Combo of manga and sketchy dramatic portraits with bold metaphoric colors washes that propel the narrative with emotion. Whet my desire to learn more about the Bangladeshi genocide and revolution -and isn’t that wha Quite gripping story and impressive debut graphic novel about the courage it takes to find yourself as a young teen, especially when society makes your choices a swim against the tide. Drawn complete with full color illustrations; while some fail, others simply take your breath away. Combo of manga and sketchy dramatic portraits with bold metaphoric colors washes that propel the narrative with emotion. Whet my desire to learn more about the Bangladeshi genocide and revolution -and isn’t that what reading is all about?! ✅

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I really liked this story, though I found it a little bit chaotic and hard to follow in spots. Of course, I was reading an uncolored proof, so I would guess that the final version was tightened up a bit, and color added to the experience. But the story itself was good and a very important one to tell. After experiencing a violent anti-Muslim attack, Nisrin and her best friend Faruzeh respond in different ways. Faruzeh retreats into herself and has a hard time going out. Nisrin decides to wear Hi I really liked this story, though I found it a little bit chaotic and hard to follow in spots. Of course, I was reading an uncolored proof, so I would guess that the final version was tightened up a bit, and color added to the experience. But the story itself was good and a very important one to tell. After experiencing a violent anti-Muslim attack, Nisrin and her best friend Faruzeh respond in different ways. Faruzeh retreats into herself and has a hard time going out. Nisrin decides to wear Hijab, though the women of her family don't, and it causes inner-family conflict.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Israa

    Thank you NetGalley for an advanced copy, albeit black-and-white. This graphic novel is about so much more than hijab. It ties together Bangladeshi culture, history, and family to religion and identity. The diversity of Muslims and their religiosity is also shown. Any middle school aged girl would identify with the friendship and parental drama. I appreciated that this is a clean book and is also educational, with the report at the end. I would recommend this title to our school library.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This incredibly powerful graphic novel tells the story of Nisrin, a middle schooler in 2002 Oregon. After a violent, hateful encounter, Nisrin has to spend the summer healing both physically and mentally, and decides to start wearing a hijab in her everyday life. She soon faces pushback from everyone in her life, even her beloved mother and grandfather. The emotional and empathetic artwork really conveys Nisrin's struggles, and helped me connect deeply with her story. This incredibly powerful graphic novel tells the story of Nisrin, a middle schooler in 2002 Oregon. After a violent, hateful encounter, Nisrin has to spend the summer healing both physically and mentally, and decides to start wearing a hijab in her everyday life. She soon faces pushback from everyone in her life, even her beloved mother and grandfather. The emotional and empathetic artwork really conveys Nisrin's struggles, and helped me connect deeply with her story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tasnim

    This book really caught my eye because I did not have hijab representation growing up. I never saw someone in a story who looked like me. This story brought tears to my eyes one numerous occasions. it was extremely well written and very inspirational. Nisrin navigating life post having a hate crime was something that I could relate to. I was also forced against my will to remove my hijab. I had no idea how to handle life after that. This book is truly amazing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dani Kappel

    This book touches on the Bangladesh Liberation War and genocide in 1971. An event I did not know about until this book. It focuses on a young girl’s decision to wear a hijab in the early 2000’s, even after she endures a hate crime because of it. It brings to light a different perspective in a beautifully illustrated way.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    Compelling plot and important message, but execution fell short. Characters such as the mother, grandmother, and grandfather felt developed, but Nisrin felt two dimensional. I appreciated the distinction between the orna and hijab and the exploration of Bangladesh history. While it didn't wow me, I feel there are a lot of young readers who will enjoy Piece by Piece. Compelling plot and important message, but execution fell short. Characters such as the mother, grandmother, and grandfather felt developed, but Nisrin felt two dimensional. I appreciated the distinction between the orna and hijab and the exploration of Bangladesh history. While it didn't wow me, I feel there are a lot of young readers who will enjoy Piece by Piece.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    What moving story! All of the characters were complex individuals and the story was very engaging. It was very interesting to learn the history of Bangladesh and it's history with religion. I was moved and drawn in by this heartfelt and poignant story. What moving story! All of the characters were complex individuals and the story was very engaging. It was very interesting to learn the history of Bangladesh and it's history with religion. I was moved and drawn in by this heartfelt and poignant story.

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