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Huda F Are You?

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From the creator of Yes, I'm Hot In This, this cheeky, hilarious, and honest graphic novel asks the question everyone has to figure out for themselves: Who are you? Huda and her family just moved to Dearborn, Michigan, a small town with a big Muslim population. In her old town, Huda knew exactly who she was: She was the hijabi girl. But in Dearborn, everyone is the hijabi g From the creator of Yes, I'm Hot In This, this cheeky, hilarious, and honest graphic novel asks the question everyone has to figure out for themselves: Who are you? Huda and her family just moved to Dearborn, Michigan, a small town with a big Muslim population. In her old town, Huda knew exactly who she was: She was the hijabi girl. But in Dearborn, everyone is the hijabi girl. Huda is lost in a sea of hijabis, and she can't rely on her hijab to define her anymore. She has to define herself. So she tries on a bunch of cliques, but she isn't a hijabi fashionista or a hijabi athlete or a hijabi gamer. She's not the one who knows everything about her religion or the one all the guys like. She's miscellaneous, which makes her feel like no one at all. Until she realizes that it'll take finding out who she isn't to figure out who she is.


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From the creator of Yes, I'm Hot In This, this cheeky, hilarious, and honest graphic novel asks the question everyone has to figure out for themselves: Who are you? Huda and her family just moved to Dearborn, Michigan, a small town with a big Muslim population. In her old town, Huda knew exactly who she was: She was the hijabi girl. But in Dearborn, everyone is the hijabi g From the creator of Yes, I'm Hot In This, this cheeky, hilarious, and honest graphic novel asks the question everyone has to figure out for themselves: Who are you? Huda and her family just moved to Dearborn, Michigan, a small town with a big Muslim population. In her old town, Huda knew exactly who she was: She was the hijabi girl. But in Dearborn, everyone is the hijabi girl. Huda is lost in a sea of hijabis, and she can't rely on her hijab to define her anymore. She has to define herself. So she tries on a bunch of cliques, but she isn't a hijabi fashionista or a hijabi athlete or a hijabi gamer. She's not the one who knows everything about her religion or the one all the guys like. She's miscellaneous, which makes her feel like no one at all. Until she realizes that it'll take finding out who she isn't to figure out who she is.

30 review for Huda F Are You?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ayman

    thank you penguin teen for the ARC; all opinions are my own bruhhhh i fucking loved this book. this shit had me hollering because it was so funny. this book was so relatable in many ways. number one being the Muslim representation; i could vicariously live through Huda as i read this book. number two; literally Huda's whole high school experience. Muslim hijabi or not I'm sure everyone can see themselves in Huda in someway shape or form. the sister bond and connection made me feel so warm and coz thank you penguin teen for the ARC; all opinions are my own bruhhhh i fucking loved this book. this shit had me hollering because it was so funny. this book was so relatable in many ways. number one being the Muslim representation; i could vicariously live through Huda as i read this book. number two; literally Huda's whole high school experience. Muslim hijabi or not I'm sure everyone can see themselves in Huda in someway shape or form. the sister bond and connection made me feel so warm and cozy. i encourage everyone to pick this book up immediately. it is fun, relatable, and overall incredible. i was smiling ear to ear the from cover to cover!!!!!!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Azanta

    To feel seen is a vulnerable thing and when it comes to representation, I tend to shy away from media with Muslims in it because inevitably I end up feeling hurt — whether it’s because the rep is offensive/comes at the sake of other Muslims or because it requires me to confront and acknowledge my own trauma. But Huda does this flawlessly in Huda F Are You?; a little bit of therapy mixed in with a good number of jokes gives way to something that I loved every second of. I’m a huge fan of Hudda’s To feel seen is a vulnerable thing and when it comes to representation, I tend to shy away from media with Muslims in it because inevitably I end up feeling hurt — whether it’s because the rep is offensive/comes at the sake of other Muslims or because it requires me to confront and acknowledge my own trauma. But Huda does this flawlessly in Huda F Are You?; a little bit of therapy mixed in with a good number of jokes gives way to something that I loved every second of. I’m a huge fan of Hudda’s work and will always continue to be grateful for what she does to continue to uplift Muslim women. 💗

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rameela (Star)

    [I received this eARC from edelweiss but my thoughts are honest and unbiased] Huda always blesses me with the perfect blend of relatability and humor and feelings like this was so great I can't wait to have it in my hands to gush over it all over again. Also, I'm glaad i'm not the only one that had a billion life crises trying to figure out how to blend in and also be completely true to myself during my weird teenage years. This felt like a story that was purely meant for me because of how spot o [I received this eARC from edelweiss but my thoughts are honest and unbiased] Huda always blesses me with the perfect blend of relatability and humor and feelings like this was so great I can't wait to have it in my hands to gush over it all over again. Also, I'm glaad i'm not the only one that had a billion life crises trying to figure out how to blend in and also be completely true to myself during my weird teenage years. This felt like a story that was purely meant for me because of how spot on some of these feelings and stories were! Would highly recommend (as usual)!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Basma

    I've been a fan of Huda's work for years, and it's always excellent. She's undeniably talented, and her humor is always spot on. This book is a fantastic story of figuring out who you are and how you fit into the world. From a representation standpoint, it's exactly what I was looking for. To be seen, not only as a Muslim woman, but as a someone who's struggled with their identity and where they fit. I really enjoyed the story told here, and how relatable it is, while also being hilarious! I tru I've been a fan of Huda's work for years, and it's always excellent. She's undeniably talented, and her humor is always spot on. This book is a fantastic story of figuring out who you are and how you fit into the world. From a representation standpoint, it's exactly what I was looking for. To be seen, not only as a Muslim woman, but as a someone who's struggled with their identity and where they fit. I really enjoyed the story told here, and how relatable it is, while also being hilarious! I truly loved the sister dynamics, as well as some of the more emotional scenes, specifically the ones with her mom. As usual, I highly recommend Huda's books, so don't miss this one when it releases! TW: Islamophobia I received an arc of this title from PenguinTeen in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sara ✨

    Thank you Penguin for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review! "I have no clue who I am or who I wanna be." I absolutely loved this book. It made me feel seen and the representation was exactly what I was looking for. Will it be reflective of every Muslim girl/woman's experience? No, of course not. But I am so happy to know that there are others out there who, like me, will find the story relatable. And then, of course, there were bits of it that I found relatable outside of my r Thank you Penguin for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review! "I have no clue who I am or who I wanna be." I absolutely loved this book. It made me feel seen and the representation was exactly what I was looking for. Will it be reflective of every Muslim girl/woman's experience? No, of course not. But I am so happy to know that there are others out there who, like me, will find the story relatable. And then, of course, there were bits of it that I found relatable outside of my religious/cultural identity, like the struggles of having 4 siblings LOL or the pressures of having to keep up good grades to meet your parents' expectations. If you haven't read any of Huda Fahmy's stories, please do. Her writing is so incredibly honest and hilarious, both of which make her a phenomenal storyteller. This is such a great book about finding yourself and figuring out how you fit into the world.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Zainab Bint Younus

    Everyone's favourite comic book hijabi (aka @yesimhotinthis ) is back in her third book!!!!! "Huda F Are You?" is Huda Fahmy's latest publication - this time, reliving her adolescent identity crisis in hilarious, honest, and unexpectedly wise ways. (I know the cheeky title has some Muslamics clutching their pearl necklaces in disapproval, but I think it's brilliant, so there!) Huda's story of discovering who she really is - forced to go beyond being "that hijabi girl" at school - will resonate with Everyone's favourite comic book hijabi (aka @yesimhotinthis ) is back in her third book!!!!! "Huda F Are You?" is Huda Fahmy's latest publication - this time, reliving her adolescent identity crisis in hilarious, honest, and unexpectedly wise ways. (I know the cheeky title has some Muslamics clutching their pearl necklaces in disapproval, but I think it's brilliant, so there!) Huda's story of discovering who she really is - forced to go beyond being "that hijabi girl" at school - will resonate with probably every Muslim teenage girl in the West. Even though I didn't even go to a public high school (homeschooling alumnus here), I still found myself deeply relating to the themes Huda delves into. Honestly, I feel like shoving this book into the hands of every single Muslim teenage girl ever. And make their mothers read it too! (And their dads!) SO SO SO GOOD!!! Definitely YA - I'd say age 12+ (there's a hilarious but slightly graphic period joke in there, which my 11yo understands and finds hysterical, but apparently other folks have more sensitivies than I do lulz) Also, my kid and her friend - both of whom are the laziest readers on the planet - have been harassing me for MONTHS about when this book will finally come out... and now I can get some peace while they throw themselves into it! 5/5 🌟

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Huda Fahmy serves up a fictionalized take on her high school years as a Muslim American living in Dearborn, Michigan. It's mostly light, breezy, and amusing teen and identity stuff, but does delve into Islamophobia, microaggressions, and bigotry. There is even a short spin on the Ahmed Mohamed clock incident, with a Muslim boy getting arrested for bringing electronics to school. A little fluffy, but still good and a valuable perspective. Huda Fahmy serves up a fictionalized take on her high school years as a Muslim American living in Dearborn, Michigan. It's mostly light, breezy, and amusing teen and identity stuff, but does delve into Islamophobia, microaggressions, and bigotry. There is even a short spin on the Ahmed Mohamed clock incident, with a Muslim boy getting arrested for bringing electronics to school. A little fluffy, but still good and a valuable perspective.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lake Villa District Library

    Staff pick from Aubri! Find this book in our catalog! Staff pick from Aubri! Find this book in our catalog!

  9. 4 out of 5

    My_Strange_Reading

    I loved this book so much. It was clever, honest, infuriating and beautiful.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Huda moved from a community where she was the only Muslim-American hijabi in her class to Dearborn, Michigan, and when she does, she has an identity crisis. No longer was the thing that once made her stand out a thing that made her unique in her school -- Dearborn has a huge Muslim-American population, and now, Huda is unsure who she is or where she fits in. This is a funny and relatable comic, and I loved how Huda wrote it as a lengthy flashback through her identity crisis, bringing readers fro Huda moved from a community where she was the only Muslim-American hijabi in her class to Dearborn, Michigan, and when she does, she has an identity crisis. No longer was the thing that once made her stand out a thing that made her unique in her school -- Dearborn has a huge Muslim-American population, and now, Huda is unsure who she is or where she fits in. This is a funny and relatable comic, and I loved how Huda wrote it as a lengthy flashback through her identity crisis, bringing readers from the watershed moment in the first couple of pages back to it in the last few. But that timeframe is only a few months, and yet, so much transpires and it's hard not to absolutely root for Huda (even when she does some cringeworthy things). The art is bright, expressive, and really fun. I thought the way Huda described her family and depicted them was both hilarious and charming; that one sister is "invisible" throughout because of her place in the family of five sisters had me laughing out loud. Especially because it paralleled how Huda felt about herself. No romance pops up in this one, though Huda does tell a boy how she feels (view spoiler)[ and when he rejects her, we see she never really had feelings for him like that but instead, was trying to figure herself out (hide spoiler)] . As a non-Muslim, I appreciated how she explained the difference between having feelings and acting upon them as part of the belief system she followed. Fahmy's graphic novel would be perfectly appropriate for middle schoolers and high schoolers, as they will relate so much to her drive to figure herself out.

  11. 5 out of 5

    On the Same Page

    ARC provided by the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. With her usual humor, Huda Fahmy delivers a memoir in the form of a young adult graphic novel that made me feel seen to my core. It's rare for me to find this kind of representation; as Huda states in the beginning, Muslims aren't a monolith, and our experiences can be vastly different. I spent my teenage years in the Middle East, so I didn't face quite the same challenges, but I still remember that feeling of not ARC provided by the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. With her usual humor, Huda Fahmy delivers a memoir in the form of a young adult graphic novel that made me feel seen to my core. It's rare for me to find this kind of representation; as Huda states in the beginning, Muslims aren't a monolith, and our experiences can be vastly different. I spent my teenage years in the Middle East, so I didn't face quite the same challenges, but I still remember that feeling of not belonging because I dressed different, had different interests, had different priorities. It definitely helps to have your family in your corner, and I loved seeing the relationship between Huda and her mother and sisters. This book is lighthearted where it can be, and serious where it needs to be, so be prepared to quickly alternate between laughing out loud and shaking with frustration and anger at what so many young Muslims regularly go through. Highly recommend picking this up. Also this title is everything. A++ would read and laugh again.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    Huda is a high school student trying to navigate the usual perils of being a teenager--with the added hurdle of the fact that she is Muslim American in small-town Michigan. While the artwork won't blow anyone away, the fact remains that HUDA F is a heartfelt, funny, sad, and educational memoir. There are elements anyone who is, or has ever been, a teenager will relate to, and it's also a real wake-up call for anyone in denial about the state of hate and prejudice in the U.S. The way the English Huda is a high school student trying to navigate the usual perils of being a teenager--with the added hurdle of the fact that she is Muslim American in small-town Michigan. While the artwork won't blow anyone away, the fact remains that HUDA F is a heartfelt, funny, sad, and educational memoir. There are elements anyone who is, or has ever been, a teenager will relate to, and it's also a real wake-up call for anyone in denial about the state of hate and prejudice in the U.S. The way the English teacher behaved toward her Muslim students was an absolute disgrace, and I hope that things actually did turn out the way Fahmy told the story in her book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy D.

    This is a quick graphic memoir dealing with coming-of-age challenges that Huda faced in high school. After moving from a town where she was the only student wearing hijab to Dearborn, Michigan, she realized that being the student in hijab could no longer be her sole identity. "Now I'm not the Muslim. I'm just a Muslim, and there are hijabis everywhere." As her younger sister pointed out, "You know that wearing hijab is not a personality trait, right?" In no way does the reader need to be Muslim to This is a quick graphic memoir dealing with coming-of-age challenges that Huda faced in high school. After moving from a town where she was the only student wearing hijab to Dearborn, Michigan, she realized that being the student in hijab could no longer be her sole identity. "Now I'm not the Muslim. I'm just a Muslim, and there are hijabis everywhere." As her younger sister pointed out, "You know that wearing hijab is not a personality trait, right?" In no way does the reader need to be Muslim to relate to this book. I am not Muslim, and there were so many things I could relate to while thinking back to my own teen years. The struggle of 'Where do I fit?' is universal during teen years and this book exposes that from a different perspective than what is common in most American young adult books.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Mangler

    What a fabulous read! I thoroughly enjoyed this one. I've never read Fahmy's work before, but that's going to change after reading this one. What a fabulous read! I thoroughly enjoyed this one. I've never read Fahmy's work before, but that's going to change after reading this one.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shazia

    I really hope she figured out Huda F she is! Reviewed this for SLJ, I'll post a link to my review once it's published. I really hope she figured out Huda F she is! Reviewed this for SLJ, I'll post a link to my review once it's published.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zoulfa Katouh

    ya i teared up lol. there were tears between the hahahaha-ing i was doing. huda never misses.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah (messbooks)

    Huda F Are You? Is a witty and charming coming-of-age novel. Huda tells her experience of being Muslim-American, as well as her journey of self-discovery and the feeling of being “in-between.” Fahmy weaves her wit and humor in with the more serious tones within the graphic novel, like Islamophobia, racism, identity, standing up, finding your own voice, and self-love. This book is great for any age, but I would especially recommend it to young teens. I feel as though many young people struggle wi Huda F Are You? Is a witty and charming coming-of-age novel. Huda tells her experience of being Muslim-American, as well as her journey of self-discovery and the feeling of being “in-between.” Fahmy weaves her wit and humor in with the more serious tones within the graphic novel, like Islamophobia, racism, identity, standing up, finding your own voice, and self-love. This book is great for any age, but I would especially recommend it to young teens. I feel as though many young people struggle with standing up to authority, especially teens who experience racism, sexism, homophobia, etc. who are frequently pressured to just accept it. Fahmy dives into the topic of finding your voice and validates the insecurity that young people might feel when experiencing marginalization. She also highlights the warning signs young people should look out for, such as downplaying the situation and fear of getting in trouble, all while keeping the book witty and enjoyable. I found that Fahmy’s work is thought-provoking, complex, and great representation for young teens, specifically young Muslim teens. I thoroughly enjoyed Huda F Are You! Thank you to Penguin Teen and NetGalley for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest and fair review!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    𝘛𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘬 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘵𝘰 𝘗𝘦𝘯𝘨𝘶𝘪𝘯 𝘛𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘷𝘪𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘮𝘦 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘢𝘯 𝘈𝘙𝘊 𝘪𝘯 𝘦𝘹𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘢𝘯 𝘩𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘳𝘦𝘷𝘪𝘦𝘸! Huda F Are You? is a graphic novel that follows Muslim teen Huda as she goes to high school in a new community where she isn't the only hijabi and tries to figure out who she wants to be/who she is. I really loved this graphic novel! It was funny, heartfelt, and relatable! Younger me would have most definitely seen herself in Huda. The one thing I didn't love was(view spoiler)[the fact that Huda didn't stand u 𝘛𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘬 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘵𝘰 𝘗𝘦𝘯𝘨𝘶𝘪𝘯 𝘛𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘱𝘳𝘰𝘷𝘪𝘥𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘮𝘦 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘢𝘯 𝘈𝘙𝘊 𝘪𝘯 𝘦𝘹𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘢𝘯 𝘩𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘳𝘦𝘷𝘪𝘦𝘸! Huda F Are You? is a graphic novel that follows Muslim teen Huda as she goes to high school in a new community where she isn't the only hijabi and tries to figure out who she wants to be/who she is. I really loved this graphic novel! It was funny, heartfelt, and relatable! Younger me would have most definitely seen herself in Huda. The one thing I didn't love was(view spoiler)[the fact that Huda didn't stand up for herself until the end! I do understand why she didn't stand up for herself initially because I've been in that place where you weigh whether or not it's worth it, but it still let me down a bit. (hide spoiler)] Overall, this is a must-read! It will put a smile on your face and make you laugh, while also touching on important subjects such as islamophobia!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Esrat of Serra ⚔

    This is an exceptionally beautiful book that is also very relatable and funny and witty. There is accurate representation of Muslims which I find rare in books even now. Though this story is fictional, I found a lot of the ideas and some of Huda's thoughts to be true in my own life, often relating to my teen and high school years. As Huda said, "its like she's starting right into my soul", yup I felt like that for the entirety of the book. I am so glad this book was written and drawn and I hop This is an exceptionally beautiful book that is also very relatable and funny and witty. There is accurate representation of Muslims which I find rare in books even now. Though this story is fictional, I found a lot of the ideas and some of Huda's thoughts to be true in my own life, often relating to my teen and high school years. As Huda said, "its like she's starting right into my soul", yup I felt like that for the entirety of the book. I am so glad this book was written and drawn and I hope the book gains more popularity for all the right reasons. So as always, thanks Huda for writing this beautiful book. ✅ Highly recommend

  20. 4 out of 5

    n

    i related to huda a bit too much

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lu

    Huda's experience and her humour is an absolute thrill! They way she has written and illustrated her life as a young brown women living in America was something I really connected with. I've been following Huda on her instagram for many years now, and I'm so glad that all her hard work has manifested in a wonderfully written (semi-auto biographical) story! I can't wait to see what she publishes next! Huda's experience and her humour is an absolute thrill! They way she has written and illustrated her life as a young brown women living in America was something I really connected with. I've been following Huda on her instagram for many years now, and I'm so glad that all her hard work has manifested in a wonderfully written (semi-auto biographical) story! I can't wait to see what she publishes next!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Saniya

    trigger warnings: islamophobia, racism Super sweet and relatable. The art was amazing and I loved the gestural expressions and emotiveness within the panels. The fully complete panels are likely going to be even better than what I got to read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    A fun and quick read, almost too quick, as it seems to rush through important moments without giving us enough time to really dig in. But bright illustrations and easy to follow narration. Art style seems to have improved / changes from the author's other graphic novel. As it's a memoir, it's a bit hard to judge the plot, but again, I wish we had taken it slower. A fun and quick read, almost too quick, as it seems to rush through important moments without giving us enough time to really dig in. But bright illustrations and easy to follow narration. Art style seems to have improved / changes from the author's other graphic novel. As it's a memoir, it's a bit hard to judge the plot, but again, I wish we had taken it slower.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathreadya

    Loved this coming of age graphic novel from author Huda Fahmy! Huda tells the story of her own high school experience as a Muslim-American coming to grips with her identity. Her honest and humor make this an entertaining and important novel. I enjoyed learning about her family and religion, and getting to know her inner struggles with identity, self-hatred, self-esteem, and fitting in. As someone who also struggled with these things in high school, I recognized myself in Huda, and loved watching Loved this coming of age graphic novel from author Huda Fahmy! Huda tells the story of her own high school experience as a Muslim-American coming to grips with her identity. Her honest and humor make this an entertaining and important novel. I enjoyed learning about her family and religion, and getting to know her inner struggles with identity, self-hatred, self-esteem, and fitting in. As someone who also struggled with these things in high school, I recognized myself in Huda, and loved watching her take baby steps to grow as a person. To see Huda learn to respect and love herself was really rewarding and inspiring. Thank you Netgalley for this ebook arc in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Pickett

    Huda F (a self-described “extension” of author-illustrator Huda Fahmy) is “just your friendly neighborhood Arab-Muslim hijab-wearing American whatever” entering the ninth grade in Dearborn, Michigan. Despite these labels, Huda isn’t sure who she really is or even who she wants to be. She tries to form a friend group while establishing her real personality, but microaggressions take a toll on her well-being (and her grades). This journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance is portrayed through Huda F (a self-described “extension” of author-illustrator Huda Fahmy) is “just your friendly neighborhood Arab-Muslim hijab-wearing American whatever” entering the ninth grade in Dearborn, Michigan. Despite these labels, Huda isn’t sure who she really is or even who she wants to be. She tries to form a friend group while establishing her real personality, but microaggressions take a toll on her well-being (and her grades). This journey from self-loathing to self-acceptance is portrayed through simple drawings, self-deprecating humor, and Huda's delightful facial expressions. Funny and unexpectedly universal!

  26. 4 out of 5

    brutallyhonestbookworm

    DUDEEE that’s my name

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Huda and her family move from a town where there are few Muslims to Dearborn, Michigan. Before, her identity was tied strongly to the fact that she was the only hijabi girl, but in Dearborn there are so many others that this doesn't set her apart at all. She settles into school and attending halaqa on Friday nights (religion class similar to Confirmation Class or the mysterious Catholic CCD that none of my friends could ever explain), but doesn't feel that she can E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Huda and her family move from a town where there are few Muslims to Dearborn, Michigan. Before, her identity was tied strongly to the fact that she was the only hijabi girl, but in Dearborn there are so many others that this doesn't set her apart at all. She settles into school and attending halaqa on Friday nights (religion class similar to Confirmation Class or the mysterious Catholic CCD that none of my friends could ever explain), but doesn't feel that she can pin down her own identity. She does find a new friend in Nabz, so she has a confidant, which is important when she has a crush on a nonMuslim boy who seems interested in her but who is more interested in her religion. Huda struggles with all of the "rules" of being Muslim, trying to figure out which ones to follow just to make her parents happy, and which ones make her happy because they align with her religious views. She struggles with learning more about her culture, dealing with teachers who can't pronounce her name, and coming to terms with the treatment of Muslims in the US. Will Huda be able to carve out a place for herself in her family, her school, and the community at large? Strengths: Graphic novel publication has increased to the point where it is necessary (and possible) to diversify the collection by genre and representation.Aside from the very emotionally fraught Piece by Piece: The Story of Nisrin's Hijab, I don't know that there is another middle grade novel with a hijabi main character. Personal identity is such a huge concern ot middle school students, so I am always interested in stories where characters are trying to figure out who they are and where their interests lie. As someone who spent an inordinate amount of time in church and church groups in middle school, I think there should be a few more representations of children in religious settings, even though (or perhaps especially because) my middle school church experience fueled the fires of my disbelief. The illustration style is fresh and colorful. This book will never make it back to the shelves. Weaknesses: I, like Ms. Fahmy's mother, am not a huge fan of the title, even though it is very clever. What I really think: I will definitely purchase this, although I would love to see some more literature about Muslims from other parts of the world. The Pakistani diaspora is well represented, but I have more students with Somalian background, and struggle to find books that represent their culture.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Did I pick up this book 90% for the title (which makes me laugh every single time I look at it)? Yes, yes I did 😁 I loved this book, and the punny title is a good intro to Huda’s storytelling style. This graphic novel is fiction but is based on Huda’s experiences, and it depicts a growing up story we can all relate to in some way. Huda is used to standing out as the only hijab wearing Muslim in her class; when her family moves to a new city with a large Muslim population, Huda loses what used to Did I pick up this book 90% for the title (which makes me laugh every single time I look at it)? Yes, yes I did 😁 I loved this book, and the punny title is a good intro to Huda’s storytelling style. This graphic novel is fiction but is based on Huda’s experiences, and it depicts a growing up story we can all relate to in some way. Huda is used to standing out as the only hijab wearing Muslim in her class; when her family moves to a new city with a large Muslim population, Huda loses what used to make her unique and she experiences a bit of an identity crisis as struggles to figure out who she is and what she wants from life. I know I’ve experienced similar “who am I?” moments in my own life, which is why all readers can find something in this book to relate to. The artwork is excellent, with great facial expressions in particular, and I’m glad she chose to tell this story as a graphic novel because so much of Huda’s experience comes through perfectly in this format. I also enjoyed getting to meet Huda’s family (parents and 4 sisters) as well as the array of people she tries to befriend in high school. Even though I don’t have that many siblings, the family dynamics rang especially true and were another highly relatable element of this book. This was definitely a quick read, but also a fun one, and I’d love more books about Huda as she navigates the rest of high school and beyond!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle Bautista

    A huge thank you to Penguin Teen and Dial Books for sending me a physical ARC in exchange for an honest review! 4 ⭐️ TW: islamophobia This was so entertaining and relatable! I enjoyed Huda’s journey of self-acceptance and self-awareness as a hijabi woman in America. Though there were parts that I personally wouldn’t be able to relate like those centered in being muslim and islam, it was very interesting to learn about their way of life and religious beliefs and saddening to see reality of how they A huge thank you to Penguin Teen and Dial Books for sending me a physical ARC in exchange for an honest review! 4 ⭐️ TW: islamophobia This was so entertaining and relatable! I enjoyed Huda’s journey of self-acceptance and self-awareness as a hijabi woman in America. Though there were parts that I personally wouldn’t be able to relate like those centered in being muslim and islam, it was very interesting to learn about their way of life and religious beliefs and saddening to see reality of how they discrimination and racism in their daily lives. The parts that I felt so close to were her experiences as a teen in high school, trying to find out who she is and where she belonged as well as the pressure she got from her parents and the need to make them proud. Those were the moments when I would laugh out loud from how embarrasingly awkward and relatable her experiences were and get emotional at times from how it was depressing to feel so lonely and lost. Huda’s writing was so witty but the emotional impact you get by the end of it was intense. I also loved how the simple art style complemented the tone of the story. The ARC I read was in black and white so I’m very excited to see how the full color version would look in the finished copies! Overall, this was a hilarous, fun, heartwarming and pun-filled read! I’m excited to read more of Huda Fahmy’s future works!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Too short, I grown when I finish reading the ARC. Too short. I love Huda and her sense of humor, but this seemed as though there should have been more adventures, though i did love how it ended, so that isn't my complaint. This is half, a fish out of water story, and half a "how to do get around teachers that hate muslims" story. On the fish out of water side, it hits the nail on the head, that a lot of teens have, where do I fit? Huda has always been the one Muslim in a sea of white people. But Too short, I grown when I finish reading the ARC. Too short. I love Huda and her sense of humor, but this seemed as though there should have been more adventures, though i did love how it ended, so that isn't my complaint. This is half, a fish out of water story, and half a "how to do get around teachers that hate muslims" story. On the fish out of water side, it hits the nail on the head, that a lot of teens have, where do I fit? Huda has always been the one Muslim in a sea of white people. But in Dearborn, she is just one of many, and what subculture does she fit in? Is the sporty one? The gamer? Or is the the beauty obsesses. This is something I can totally related to. It helps when you find your spot with the right group, but what if there is not group for you? I too was the "smart" one, but there is no sub-group for that. So, a universal theme. Representation matters. How many books out there that give the high school experience as seen from an American-Muslim point of view? If you love Huda, you will love this book. If you have not read Huda, go out and find her web-strip "Yes, I'm hot in this." Thanks to Edelweiss for making this book available or an honest review.

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