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Proctor Valley Road

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August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” on the most haunted stretch of road in America, but when it turns deadly they must slay the evils roaming Proctor Valley Road! August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” with their classmates on the most haunted, demon-infested stretch of road in America to fund attending the concert of their drea August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” on the most haunted stretch of road in America, but when it turns deadly they must slay the evils roaming Proctor Valley Road! August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” with their classmates on the most haunted, demon-infested stretch of road in America to fund attending the concert of their dreams. But when their visit turns deadly, these four friends race to rescue the missing students… before the town tears them limb from limb. Now they must slay the evils roaming Proctor Valley Road… along with the monsters lurking in the hearts of 1970s America. Visionary author Grant Morrison (Klaus, Batman: Arkham Asylum) and co-writer Alex Child (BBC’s Holby City) along with artist Naomi Franquiz (Tales from Harrow County) present a chilling new horror series about the mysterious monsters that haunt Proctor Valley Road – and the four misfit teenagers who must stop them. Collects Proctor Valley Road #1-5.


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August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” on the most haunted stretch of road in America, but when it turns deadly they must slay the evils roaming Proctor Valley Road! August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” with their classmates on the most haunted, demon-infested stretch of road in America to fund attending the concert of their drea August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” on the most haunted stretch of road in America, but when it turns deadly they must slay the evils roaming Proctor Valley Road! August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” with their classmates on the most haunted, demon-infested stretch of road in America to fund attending the concert of their dreams. But when their visit turns deadly, these four friends race to rescue the missing students… before the town tears them limb from limb. Now they must slay the evils roaming Proctor Valley Road… along with the monsters lurking in the hearts of 1970s America. Visionary author Grant Morrison (Klaus, Batman: Arkham Asylum) and co-writer Alex Child (BBC’s Holby City) along with artist Naomi Franquiz (Tales from Harrow County) present a chilling new horror series about the mysterious monsters that haunt Proctor Valley Road – and the four misfit teenagers who must stop them. Collects Proctor Valley Road #1-5.

57 review for Proctor Valley Road

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    It’s the summer of 1970 in Southern California and four friends need money to get tickets for the upcoming Janis Joplin concert. Luckily, there happens to be a haunted stretch of highway on Proctor Valley Road that they decide to make money off of by offering paid tours of the area to rubes. But, oh no, the ghosties is real - and lotsa people gonna die! I’m a big fan but Grant Morrison is not immune to the occasional crap comic and Proctor Valley Road, even though there’s another writer involved It’s the summer of 1970 in Southern California and four friends need money to get tickets for the upcoming Janis Joplin concert. Luckily, there happens to be a haunted stretch of highway on Proctor Valley Road that they decide to make money off of by offering paid tours of the area to rubes. But, oh no, the ghosties is real - and lotsa people gonna die! I’m a big fan but Grant Morrison is not immune to the occasional crap comic and Proctor Valley Road, even though there’s another writer involved, is definitely a crap Morrison comic. This is me a-speculating but I feel like this was a failed TV show idea that got repurposed into a comic. It’s basically “What if Strangers Things was set in the ‘70s instead of the ‘80s?” (the cast are all kids/nostalgia/spooky stuff happening in small town). In Supergods, Morrison talks about cynically consulting star charts and the like to dowse future trends and capitalise on them, so Morrison isn’t above being mercenary. And Alex Child, who wouldn’t have gotten this book published if it were just his name on the comic, is a TV screenwriter… Regardless, this is a bad comic for many other reasons. The characters are a boring bunch and I just don’t care about the things these teenage girls do - lusting after boys, wanting to be an astronaut, not being a ‘fraidy cat - in part because Morrison/Child failed to make the reader care in the first place. Proctor Valley Road just happens to be haunted for silly reasons by uninteresting stock monsters (pretty sure the minotaur monster is a straight lift from Harrow County, which Naomi Franquiz is an artist on) and a cliched evil witch who has cliched evil witch reasons. Cliches abound like the smalltown ignorant white jocks at the county fair and a librarian who appears at the right time for an info dump. There’s a lot of lazy storytelling choices here too - August somehow survives a car explosion that destroys a giant monster but leaves her with nary a scratch, despite her being under the car at the time of the explosion! When the girls are trapped in a burning house, some random dude appears to save them and then connects them to a shaman he’s related to to get them to the next plot point. It’s so contrived. All of which amounts to a very boring and forgettable YA comic, which is what Proctor Valley Road is. A poorly conceived, weakly executed, overly written and unimpressive story that never once entertained - easily one of Grant Morrison’s worst comics.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    This was an enjoyable if somewhat by-the-numbers horror story. I liked the characters and their little world a great deal and this charm staved off my doubts about the plot. It was genuinely creepy, and even a little scary at times, but it owes a great deal to Harrow County… something that was highlighted by the fact the two books share an (admittedly pretty great) artist. There was also a little of Stephen King’s It in the mix here but it was none the worse for that. I really enjoyed this one, des This was an enjoyable if somewhat by-the-numbers horror story. I liked the characters and their little world a great deal and this charm staved off my doubts about the plot. It was genuinely creepy, and even a little scary at times, but it owes a great deal to Harrow County… something that was highlighted by the fact the two books share an (admittedly pretty great) artist. There was also a little of Stephen King’s It in the mix here but it was none the worse for that. I really enjoyed this one, despite its lack of originality, and would definitely pick up the second volume if it gets made. I believe this series is being pitched to t.v. companies and I’d probably watch the show if it gets picked up, too. My next book: The Inferno

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I know Grant Morrison's name is attached to this but this didn't feel like a Morrison comic at all. I think this is Alex Child's baby all the way. It's about four teenage girls who get involved with some kind of evil spirit when some boys they are with get abducted by this spirit and her monsters. This could have been really good had it been more focused on the story than hijinks and humor. It was an odd dichotomy of goofy humor, drugs, and horror that didn't completely work for me. I know Grant Morrison's name is attached to this but this didn't feel like a Morrison comic at all. I think this is Alex Child's baby all the way. It's about four teenage girls who get involved with some kind of evil spirit when some boys they are with get abducted by this spirit and her monsters. This could have been really good had it been more focused on the story than hijinks and humor. It was an odd dichotomy of goofy humor, drugs, and horror that didn't completely work for me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    As I get older, I find myself closing a lot of new comic books and thinking "That was tough to read." This was tough to read. This book reeks of an attempt by Grant Morrison and Alex Child, a screenwriter by trade, to come up with a teen-friendly IP to sell to a streaming service. I guarantee you Grant Morison had no involvement with this past the concept. "Wise-ass kids live near a haunted road. Go write it, Alex!" This had zero feel of Morrison, in either the dialogue, characterization, or ex As I get older, I find myself closing a lot of new comic books and thinking "That was tough to read." This was tough to read. This book reeks of an attempt by Grant Morrison and Alex Child, a screenwriter by trade, to come up with a teen-friendly IP to sell to a streaming service. I guarantee you Grant Morison had no involvement with this past the concept. "Wise-ass kids live near a haunted road. Go write it, Alex!" This had zero feel of Morrison, in either the dialogue, characterization, or execution. The diverse cast ticks every box that a streaming service would want, the 70s nostalgia factor feeds off of the Stranger Things vibe that they were clearly going for, and the story could easily be all-ages except for the occasional needless f-bomb. The whole affair just screamed money-grab. Also, I grew up in the 70's, and no one talked like this. After reading this and SUPERMAN AND THE AUTHORITY over the past few days, both of which stunk to high heaven, Grant Morrison is going on my "Do not buy" list.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    This reads like a Boom title from ten years ago - a group of girls on a spooky adventure, full of positive enforcement. Each girl has their own personal problem bothering them, which will of course get solved. It takes place in the Seventies, which hardly seems to be important - it's background noise at most. The spooky story isn't very spooky, and Child tries to force too much plot in the five issues/chapters that we get. Someone gets killed early on in the story, and it has nowhere near the impa This reads like a Boom title from ten years ago - a group of girls on a spooky adventure, full of positive enforcement. Each girl has their own personal problem bothering them, which will of course get solved. It takes place in the Seventies, which hardly seems to be important - it's background noise at most. The spooky story isn't very spooky, and Child tries to force too much plot in the five issues/chapters that we get. Someone gets killed early on in the story, and it has nowhere near the impact you'd think it should have (in fact, all the spookiness doesn't have too much impact). There is absolutely no sign of Grant Morrison's hand in any of this. My guess is he maybe had a look at the script, perhaps gave some notes, and then let them attach his name to the project. (Thanks to Boom Studios for providing me with a review copy through NetGalley)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    I'm such a sucker for this brand of "horror" that I enjoyed almost the whole ride, even with the choppy pacing and lukewarm scares. The Scooby-Doo adjacent vibes are great, the illustrations from Naomi Franquiz strike a perfect balance between macabre and charming, and Tamra Bonvillain's colors reiterate that she's one of the best in the business. If the ending hadn't tripped over itself, I probably would've enjoyed this more because, as messy as the journey is, it's fun! The goofy, endearingly I'm such a sucker for this brand of "horror" that I enjoyed almost the whole ride, even with the choppy pacing and lukewarm scares. The Scooby-Doo adjacent vibes are great, the illustrations from Naomi Franquiz strike a perfect balance between macabre and charming, and Tamra Bonvillain's colors reiterate that she's one of the best in the business. If the ending hadn't tripped over itself, I probably would've enjoyed this more because, as messy as the journey is, it's fun! The goofy, endearingly vulgar characters and great setting contribute a lot to the miniseries. Still, the conclusion very much trips over itself and tries to pack in way too much plot in a very cramped final issue that ultimately lacks any stakes, resolution, or payoff. Morrison and Child desperately needed another issue, at least, to come to anything resembling a satisfying ending. It's a huge bummer because I enjoyed the series overall, especially those first two issues, which are steeped in tantalizing bits of lore and horror that, sadly, don't lead to anything all that memorable. At the very least, though, the comic has impeccable vibes, which is definitely worth something.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 Total review score: 3.55 Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 Total review score: 3.55

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Bait and Switch crap. The promised period-piece horror comic is infected with modern politics and ideas. An absolute chore to read. Avoid at all costs.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Unfortunately I became less and less interested as the story went on. For being a limited series it wasn’t very well planned out, and it was filled to the brim with plot conveniences and pseudo girl power. The narrative beats almost made it seem like it was just written as Netflix bait, and well, it looks like they got a nibble.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meghan Ryan

    I loved the cast, the premise, and the art. Unfortunately, the story telling was noticably rushed and I wish this had an extra issue or two to allow it to breathe a bit. It's definitely a great book to pick up if you're looking for some light horror. I loved the cast, the premise, and the art. Unfortunately, the story telling was noticably rushed and I wish this had an extra issue or two to allow it to breathe a bit. It's definitely a great book to pick up if you're looking for some light horror.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dean

    August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” with their classmates on the most haunted, demon-infested stretch of road in America to fund attending the concert of their dreams. But when their visit turns deadly, these four friends must slay the evils roaming Proctor Valley Road… along with the monsters lurking in the hearts of 1970s America. Proctor Valley Road has been mentioned to me by various fellow readers so I pretty much knew the premise upon diving in here. It's essentially August, Rylee, Cora & Jennie have organized a “Spook Tour” with their classmates on the most haunted, demon-infested stretch of road in America to fund attending the concert of their dreams. But when their visit turns deadly, these four friends must slay the evils roaming Proctor Valley Road… along with the monsters lurking in the hearts of 1970s America. Proctor Valley Road has been mentioned to me by various fellow readers so I pretty much knew the premise upon diving in here. It's essentially a Scooby-Doo type story, by which I mean - it sort of ticks all those horror boxes but feels like it's really targeted at younger adult reading. It's definitely not scary. At all. The art is undoubtedly gorgeous here. It's a cartoon style - nobody is aiming for realism here - and the lightheartedness of the writing has the balance feeling just right between the two. Unfortunately, I did find the world building extremely lacking here. There's not a lot explained to the reader - having read this I still couldn't explain certain things. I mean, I know 'what' happened, but have no idea of 'how' it was all possible. It all seems to whizz by at super speed, which I find is really uncharacteristic of Grant Morrison. It definitely doesn't feel like one of his books, which possibly accounts for my disappointment here. Overall, it's a snappy YA read, but one that never really gets a chance to breathe because of it. It also seems perfectly in step with all the tropes that streaming services require these days leaving you wondering if this was written with such a thing in mind and for me that sadly comes at its detriment. Thank you to Boom! Studios & NetGalley for making a copy of Proctor Valley Road available in exchange for this honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    It's 1970 and four teenage girls who are trying to save up money to see a Janis Joplin concert get the idea to take some boys out to Proctor Valley Road on a made up ghost tour to secure the funds they need. Little do they know that actual dangerous paranormal entities lurk in that area, claiming the boys and leaving the girls as suspects in their disappearance. The girls decide they need to solve the problem themselves and engage with horrors they never could have imagined. The premise I describ It's 1970 and four teenage girls who are trying to save up money to see a Janis Joplin concert get the idea to take some boys out to Proctor Valley Road on a made up ghost tour to secure the funds they need. Little do they know that actual dangerous paranormal entities lurk in that area, claiming the boys and leaving the girls as suspects in their disappearance. The girls decide they need to solve the problem themselves and engage with horrors they never could have imagined. The premise I described above is actually way better sounding than how the comic played out. It wasn't bad, but it wasn't as good as it could have been. The artwork was a bit too Archie-ish for a horror comic. And while the story had numerous interesting elements, some of which felt like they were thrown in there because the creative team just couldn't edit themselves properly, the story played out like a mismatch between Scoody-Doo and Supernatural (and not the glorious "Scooby-Natural episode). There were some great ideas that were just rushed through instead of being developed more deeply. Again, it felt like the creative team had all these ideas floating around but couldn't figure out how to really connect them properly, so they just had stuff "happen" and went with it. The graphic novel wasn't bad or unentertaining, it just didn't live up to its potential.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bobzen

    Imagine Richard Linklater's Dazed and Confused if it was written as a horror-fantasy adventure instead of a slice of life story. I don't read much YA fiction, but it felt like Grant Morrison and Alex Child tried to emulate YA genre tropes without being too clean with them, which would have killed the authenticity of the 70s California vibe they were going for (the kids smoke, drink and do weed throughout the story). On Morrison's part this book might be the oddest one recently, because of the ap Imagine Richard Linklater's Dazed and Confused if it was written as a horror-fantasy adventure instead of a slice of life story. I don't read much YA fiction, but it felt like Grant Morrison and Alex Child tried to emulate YA genre tropes without being too clean with them, which would have killed the authenticity of the 70s California vibe they were going for (the kids smoke, drink and do weed throughout the story). On Morrison's part this book might be the oddest one recently, because of the apparent lack of metatextuality. I had fun reading it and might check out the sequel, but the plotting felt very rushed more often than not and some of the contrivances in later issues came off as too cheap for my taste.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mik Cope

    I wasn't keen on the artwork to begin with, but it grew on me and suited the story. Ah, yes, the story; all a bit cliché, really, though the characters were well written and believable. I did wonder just how much Grant Morrison contributed to the project. Poor. I wasn't keen on the artwork to begin with, but it grew on me and suited the story. Ah, yes, the story; all a bit cliché, really, though the characters were well written and believable. I did wonder just how much Grant Morrison contributed to the project. Poor.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Terrance

    Enjoyable characters that I'd like to see again, but the pacing was terribly laid out. Characters appeared in places they simply could not be without any explanation. It's as if several pages or panels were just missing altogether. Could have easily been six issues to better pace the story and provide better continuity. Enjoyable characters that I'd like to see again, but the pacing was terribly laid out. Characters appeared in places they simply could not be without any explanation. It's as if several pages or panels were just missing altogether. Could have easily been six issues to better pace the story and provide better continuity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I've been a Grant Morrison fan for a long time, and I was delighted when this book popped up on Netgalley. Their first foray (to my knowledge) into YA comics is incredibly successful. Proctor Valley Road boasts a great cast of friends who are both well-written and gorgeously designed. The setting-- southern California in the summer of 1970-- is effectively rendered through scene dressing, color palette, and pop culture references. This evocative realism co-exists beautifully alongside the story' I've been a Grant Morrison fan for a long time, and I was delighted when this book popped up on Netgalley. Their first foray (to my knowledge) into YA comics is incredibly successful. Proctor Valley Road boasts a great cast of friends who are both well-written and gorgeously designed. The setting-- southern California in the summer of 1970-- is effectively rendered through scene dressing, color palette, and pop culture references. This evocative realism co-exists beautifully alongside the story's supernatural elements. Readers of all ages will enjoy getting to know August and her friends and finding out what exactly is going on at Proctor Valley Road.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A new Grant Morrison comic? Well, even if Morrison has been a lot less consistently impressive lately, that's still of interest. Except that it's a co-write, with someone whose bracket-worthy credit after name is...Holby City. Right. And it does feel very light on that characteristic Morrison strangeness, or even on the grasp of everyday Britishness you'd hope for if putting a charitable construction on the Holby alumnus. Instead, we're back in the era of Nixon and 'Nam, somewhere not far north A new Grant Morrison comic? Well, even if Morrison has been a lot less consistently impressive lately, that's still of interest. Except that it's a co-write, with someone whose bracket-worthy credit after name is...Holby City. Right. And it does feel very light on that characteristic Morrison strangeness, or even on the grasp of everyday Britishness you'd hope for if putting a charitable construction on the Holby alumnus. Instead, we're back in the era of Nixon and 'Nam, somewhere not far north of the Mexican border, where four US teens trying to make the price of tickets to see Janis Joplin instead find themselves falling foul of the ghosts and ghoulies on the eponymous road, not to mention the media and the law as things get increasingly out of hand. Naomi Franquiz and Tamra Bonvillain's art recalls another small town American horror comic, Harrow County, but where Tyler Crook's work there could capture the spookiness as well as the slice of life stuff, here the apparitions only ever feel strange rather than properly unsettling. Perhaps if Morrison and Child had tried to do something on a haunted thoroughfare over this side of the Atlantic, where both of them come from, they might have ended up with something a little more characterful, not to mention timely given the folk horror revival. As is, by entering the crowded field of US-set horror comics, they've ended up with something which feels like a mid-range Cullen Bunn miniseries, or a wannabe Stranger Things, and one can only infer that the choice of setting was made with more of an eye to potential screen adaptations than out of any desperate belief in a story that had to be told. (Netgalley ARC)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shari

    I was so excited when asked to review the new graphic novel, Proctor Valley Road. I recently started collecting comics and Proctor Valley Road was one series I picked up. It’s a scary, imaginative, and at times funny read. The graphic novel brings together in one book all five issues of the comic. Based on urban legends in the early 70s, Proctor Valley Road is the story of four teenage girls who decide to take people on spook tours of Proctor Valley Road in order to raise money for tickets to a J I was so excited when asked to review the new graphic novel, Proctor Valley Road. I recently started collecting comics and Proctor Valley Road was one series I picked up. It’s a scary, imaginative, and at times funny read. The graphic novel brings together in one book all five issues of the comic. Based on urban legends in the early 70s, Proctor Valley Road is the story of four teenage girls who decide to take people on spook tours of Proctor Valley Road in order to raise money for tickets to a Janis Joplin concert. Of course, their first tour goes awry when their customers, three teenage boys about to be drafted to Vietnam, go missing. Being accused of helping the boys dodge the draft, the girls go back to Proctor Valley Road to find them. What they find is so scary and out there, it’s not to be believed. Proctor Valley Road also shares a little about each girls’ home life. Jennie-O wants to be an astronaut. August lives with her mom after her father deserted them. Rylee is in love with a boy that doesn’t seem to notice her. Cora is afraid of the dark and has a spooky secret of her own. The story is short but fully-developed. The art is well-done, detailed and fills the entire frame. The coloring is vibrant and evokes the 1970s. Proctor Valley Road, the graphic novel, is perfect for comic book collectors and non-collectors alike. For collectors of the comic books, the graphic novel provides a way to revisit the story at any time allowing you to leave the comic books in their protective sleeves. For non-collectors, the book is a great read without having to scour the comic books stores in search of hard-to-find issues. Thanks to NetGalley and Boom Studios for an advance e-reader copy in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul Cochrun

    Yes. Proctor Valley Road has many things in common with Stranger Things… Group of misfits… monster baddies… set in past, loaded with nostalgia. But how does it diverge from the Netflix series? And does it enough to stand on its own? The title refers to an actual county road in Southern California that a several kids believe is populated by ghosts. So much so that they think they may be able to earn some money taking people out there for spooky tours. The goal is to make enough to get them to the Yes. Proctor Valley Road has many things in common with Stranger Things… Group of misfits… monster baddies… set in past, loaded with nostalgia. But how does it diverge from the Netflix series? And does it enough to stand on its own? The title refers to an actual county road in Southern California that a several kids believe is populated by ghosts. So much so that they think they may be able to earn some money taking people out there for spooky tours. The goal is to make enough to get them to the Janis Joplin show. To answer the above question: Proctor Valley Road is an actual place that has had its own stories connected to it. It doesn’t take much to see the connection between the demons and the commentary on the state of race relations and the treatment of women in the 70s. Demons abound, authorized by society and some out there I liked this one for the characters and relationships, but the horror elements where a little repetitive at times… but the art is almost unmissable with great use of light and color in the dark scenes. Check out this preview. 3.5 out of 5 stars. Thank you to NetGalley, Boom Studios, and the creators for an advanced copy for review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    Proctor Valley Road has it all: a haunted road, ghosts, creepy crawlies, friendship, and Janis Joplin. I loved reading this graphic novel. I was hooked from start to finish. August, Rylee, Cora, and Jennie are incredible characters and I loved getting to know them throughout the story. I love the character designs. Each character is so unique and their personalities are captured so well in the book's illustrations. As someone who was already familiar with Proctor Valley Road, the actual place, i Proctor Valley Road has it all: a haunted road, ghosts, creepy crawlies, friendship, and Janis Joplin. I loved reading this graphic novel. I was hooked from start to finish. August, Rylee, Cora, and Jennie are incredible characters and I loved getting to know them throughout the story. I love the character designs. Each character is so unique and their personalities are captured so well in the book's illustrations. As someone who was already familiar with Proctor Valley Road, the actual place, it was so interesting to see the story play out. I will also say, I am completely terrified to ever be on that road again. I don't have August, Rylee, Cora, and Jennie there to help me ghoul bust! If you are looking for a graphic novel to send chills up your spine, look no further than Proctor Valley Road.

  21. 5 out of 5

    A.J. Anders

    Definitely more of an Alex Childs story than a Grant Morrison one. I’m honestly suprised he wrote this as I’ve read a good amount of his work, and didn’t see any of his usual DNA here. O well, it isn’t completely horrible. Fun ghost story, solid art, during a pretty interesting time in American history. I probably would’ve liked this even more if Morrison’s name wasn’t attached. It is 100% not anything like something like Nameless.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    3 stars. Thank you Netgalley for the arc. This is definitely an adult graphic novel/comic. The violence and language wasn't too bad but still be aware. The friendship dynamic was the best part of this book. The writing wasn't my favorite nor was the art style. But seeing a strong female friendship group was worth the read. 3 stars. Thank you Netgalley for the arc. This is definitely an adult graphic novel/comic. The violence and language wasn't too bad but still be aware. The friendship dynamic was the best part of this book. The writing wasn't my favorite nor was the art style. But seeing a strong female friendship group was worth the read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mike Jozic

    I would have gone 5 stars if it wasn't just a bit clumsy sticking the landing. Still a very strong 4 stars and an enjoyable book. The writers described it as Scooby-Doo on mushrooms and they weren't too far off. A good spooky mystery friendship adventure. Here's hoping they make more. I would have gone 5 stars if it wasn't just a bit clumsy sticking the landing. Still a very strong 4 stars and an enjoyable book. The writers described it as Scooby-Doo on mushrooms and they weren't too far off. A good spooky mystery friendship adventure. Here's hoping they make more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abhi Bhattacharyya

    I loved the sarcastic jokes and banter between the characters. It had a wonderful mix of horror and teenage drama set in the 60s. I will have to Google to get some of the more relevant jokes of the era.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

    Really fun!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    Short and somewhat by-the-numbers but a fun b-horror tale with great art and occasionally some real heart. No hesitance needed if you like a quick spook!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gloss M. R.

    Breve y algo por números, pero una divertida historia de b-horror con un gran arte y, ocasionalmente, algo de corazón real. ¡No necesitas titubear si te gusta un fantasma rápido!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Iaru

    Es una buena historia pero solo para pasar el momento, como que no me terminó de llamar del todo. El arte me gustó bastante pero en temas del "horror" meh, se quedaba corto. Es una buena historia pero solo para pasar el momento, como que no me terminó de llamar del todo. El arte me gustó bastante pero en temas del "horror" meh, se quedaba corto.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Tindle

    Loved it! Want more!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gene

  31. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  32. 5 out of 5

    Ben Brown

  33. 5 out of 5

    Austin Sill

  34. 5 out of 5

    James

  35. 5 out of 5

    Deepak

  36. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell Kukulka

  37. 4 out of 5

    Crud Mucosa

  38. 4 out of 5

    Alec Brownie

  39. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

  40. 4 out of 5

    Michael Nelissen

  41. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  42. 5 out of 5

    Mori

  43. 4 out of 5

    roseblue

  44. 5 out of 5

    Millie

  45. 4 out of 5

    Bianca Macedo

  46. 4 out of 5

    Quinn Castaneda

  47. 5 out of 5

    Maria Myklevoll

  48. 5 out of 5

    Rob Ryan

  49. 5 out of 5

    Zahin Wadud

  50. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  51. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  52. 5 out of 5

    DZMM

  53. 4 out of 5

    Can Richards

  54. 5 out of 5

    Ina Korsgaard Hervig

  55. 5 out of 5

    Msbookgal

  56. 5 out of 5

    Xavier

  57. 4 out of 5

    Jillian

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