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Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone

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The past may seem the safest place to be . . . but it is the most dangerous time to be alive. . . . Jamie Fraser and Claire Randall were torn apart by the Jacobite Rising in 1746, and it took them twenty years to find each other again. Now the American Revolution threatens to do the same. It is 1779 and Claire and Jamie are at last reunited with their daughter, Brianna, he The past may seem the safest place to be . . . but it is the most dangerous time to be alive. . . . Jamie Fraser and Claire Randall were torn apart by the Jacobite Rising in 1746, and it took them twenty years to find each other again. Now the American Revolution threatens to do the same. It is 1779 and Claire and Jamie are at last reunited with their daughter, Brianna, her husband, Roger, and their children on Fraser’s Ridge. Having the family together is a dream the Frasers had thought impossible. Yet even in the North Carolina backcountry, the effects of war are being felt. Tensions in the Colonies are great and local feelings run hot enough to boil Hell’s teakettle. Jamie knows loyalties among his tenants are split and it won’t be long until the war is on his doorstep. Brianna and Roger have their own worry: that the dangers that provoked their escape from the twentieth century might catch up to them. Sometimes they question whether risking the perils of the 1700s—among them disease, starvation, and an impending war—was indeed the safer choice for their family. Not so far away, young William Ransom is still coming to terms with the discovery of his true father’s identity—and thus his own—and Lord John Grey has reconciliations to make, and dangers to meet . . . on his son’s behalf, and his own. Meanwhile, the Revolutionary War creeps ever closer to Fraser’s Ridge. And with the family finally together, Jamie and Claire have more at stake than ever before.


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The past may seem the safest place to be . . . but it is the most dangerous time to be alive. . . . Jamie Fraser and Claire Randall were torn apart by the Jacobite Rising in 1746, and it took them twenty years to find each other again. Now the American Revolution threatens to do the same. It is 1779 and Claire and Jamie are at last reunited with their daughter, Brianna, he The past may seem the safest place to be . . . but it is the most dangerous time to be alive. . . . Jamie Fraser and Claire Randall were torn apart by the Jacobite Rising in 1746, and it took them twenty years to find each other again. Now the American Revolution threatens to do the same. It is 1779 and Claire and Jamie are at last reunited with their daughter, Brianna, her husband, Roger, and their children on Fraser’s Ridge. Having the family together is a dream the Frasers had thought impossible. Yet even in the North Carolina backcountry, the effects of war are being felt. Tensions in the Colonies are great and local feelings run hot enough to boil Hell’s teakettle. Jamie knows loyalties among his tenants are split and it won’t be long until the war is on his doorstep. Brianna and Roger have their own worry: that the dangers that provoked their escape from the twentieth century might catch up to them. Sometimes they question whether risking the perils of the 1700s—among them disease, starvation, and an impending war—was indeed the safer choice for their family. Not so far away, young William Ransom is still coming to terms with the discovery of his true father’s identity—and thus his own—and Lord John Grey has reconciliations to make, and dangers to meet . . . on his son’s behalf, and his own. Meanwhile, the Revolutionary War creeps ever closer to Fraser’s Ridge. And with the family finally together, Jamie and Claire have more at stake than ever before.

58 review for Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone

  1. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    3.5 stars? I think seven years of waiting means this definitely qualifies as my most anticipated book of the year if not the decade. Was this book worth that long wait? Well.....yes and no. I honestly think Gabaldon forgot how to make a book have a plot. Clocking in at 902 pages long, you would be inclined to think there will be some epic storytelling going on in this bad boy, and you would be wrong. But I say that with love, because Gabaldon doesn't need a plot. She has made these characters come 3.5 stars? I think seven years of waiting means this definitely qualifies as my most anticipated book of the year if not the decade. Was this book worth that long wait? Well.....yes and no. I honestly think Gabaldon forgot how to make a book have a plot. Clocking in at 902 pages long, you would be inclined to think there will be some epic storytelling going on in this bad boy, and you would be wrong. But I say that with love, because Gabaldon doesn't need a plot. She has made these characters come to life in a way that few present-day authors can. Does she want to tell me about some bees? How about building yet another house? Travelling somewhere to buy some things? Tell me more! I love these characters and I am obviously biased and will happily read their grocery list. And that's a good thing, because at one point Claire does indeed give Jamie a shopping list. This is definitely a character study novel with a large cast of characters. So if you are already an Outlander series fan, then this book will hopefully satisfy your seven year itch. However, if you are already kind of on the fence or you have been missing the excitement of the earlier novels featuring just Jamie and Claire and the impending doom of Culloden, well, this book isn't likely to improve your opinion of the series. This book is very much giving 'second book in a trilogy' vibes - there is a lot of setup going on for some big events coming soon. It just might take another 7 (or 14?) years until we get to see that pay off. I'll be waiting.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jessica ✨ℬℴℴк ∞❤∞ ℒℴvℯr✨

    To all the people reviewing this without reading it. STOP! Good, bad, or indifferent. If you haven't read a book, you shouldn't be reviewing it. A review requires you to have knowledge of the contents. Also, this isn't the place to complain about the price of the book, orders being canceled, or for calling people Karens because they tell you it's wrong to "review" a book you haven't read. Also, what is wrong with all of you 1-Star raters? You haven't read it. What is your issue? What is wrong wi To all the people reviewing this without reading it. STOP! Good, bad, or indifferent. If you haven't read a book, you shouldn't be reviewing it. A review requires you to have knowledge of the contents. Also, this isn't the place to complain about the price of the book, orders being canceled, or for calling people Karens because they tell you it's wrong to "review" a book you haven't read. Also, what is wrong with all of you 1-Star raters? You haven't read it. What is your issue? What is wrong with you? Wait for the book to come out and READ THE DANG BOOK! Only then should you bother reviewing it. So rude.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    I loved it and didn’t love it. I slept through through a lot of it so I would really like the reread of the whole series. We shall see … Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾 I loved it and didn’t love it. I slept through through a lot of it so I would really like the reread of the whole series. We shall see … Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    Self indulgence. 900 + pages of self-Indulgence. I picture a conversation: Publisher: please, Diana. Please will you give us the new book? We’ve been waiting 7 years Diana Gabaldon: it’s not finished yet. I keep thinking of new chapters I want to add, so that people can know about the smells and sounds that a cadaver makes. Publisher: for the love of God, just give it to us! DG: for the love of God…that reminds me, I need another chapter featuring a long religious service, or maybe two characters ca Self indulgence. 900 + pages of self-Indulgence. I picture a conversation: Publisher: please, Diana. Please will you give us the new book? We’ve been waiting 7 years Diana Gabaldon: it’s not finished yet. I keep thinking of new chapters I want to add, so that people can know about the smells and sounds that a cadaver makes. Publisher: for the love of God, just give it to us! DG: for the love of God…that reminds me, I need another chapter featuring a long religious service, or maybe two characters can just discuss religion for like 10 pages. Publisher: please! The holidays are coming and if we publish it today we’ll still make the holiday shopping season! DG: ok, you can have it, but no one has edited it. Publisher: it doesn’t matter! Send it to the printer!! This is the only explanation I can come up with for why this book is so bad. That people waited so long for such a bad book…it’s a tragedy. It’s like no one will tell her that her writing has gone in the crapper, or maybe she just doesn’t care anymore. That’s what it feels like. If the next book does not conclude this series than I think it will never end. Diana Gabaldon doesn’t know how to let go.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    "Disappointing" (followed by, "she's really not much as a writer...") about says it all. We've waited a long time for this installment, and I had the fantasy that DG had ample time to polish whatever she was brooding on, but...no. Apologies to those who are enraptured by her "detailed descriptions": One would think that a writer who had six or seven years in production of a novel would have ironed out the more egregious flaws, as well as twigged to the fact that this particular offering goes now "Disappointing" (followed by, "she's really not much as a writer...") about says it all. We've waited a long time for this installment, and I had the fantasy that DG had ample time to polish whatever she was brooding on, but...no. Apologies to those who are enraptured by her "detailed descriptions": One would think that a writer who had six or seven years in production of a novel would have ironed out the more egregious flaws, as well as twigged to the fact that this particular offering goes nowhere fast. Now that I have pissed off all the loyal DG groupies out there, I will, of course, expand on that assertion. First, and I have multiple readings of the previous eight in the series to back me up here: DG has certain "ticks" as a writer that an editor really worth his salt should have caught and dealt with. I refer to her overuse of certain stock expressions, as well as niggling inconsistencies in the continuity within and between scenes. To wit: Her characters react to everything from mild surprise to being belted in the head with a heavy object by "shaking [their] head[s]" - or, worse, "shaking [the] head to clear it." The last shows up six times, word for word (yes, I counted), which might could be excused by the sheer length of the book, EXCEPT for the fact that this is long-standing bad habit (more wide-spread in other volumes; I counted those, too!), and one that is fairly easy to correct, given modern computer-assisted editing. All that head-shaking is mind-boggling in more ways than the obvious, and revealing of shoddy attention to detail that is basic to the writing process. There are other overuses, but I don't wish to belabor the point. The inconsistencies: Is it too much to ask that, when a character empties a brandy bottle in Scene X, it stays empty, and he doesn't pick it up for another glug a breath later? Or that a character introduced as "Corporal So-and-so" in one line remains in his rank, not becoming "Sergeant So-and-so" in the next line? (See Claire's operation on Corporal/Sergeant Jackson's compound leg fracture.) That "Fizzy" not become "Lizzy" then revert, as does Fergus' daughter? I think it's telling that these carelessnesses remain in a novel which carries an Afterword that tries very hard to impress us with all the historical research that went into making it a thing of factual accuracy. A little of the effort expended could have gone into a first-rate job of editing. (After all, DG goes to great lengths to get the plants, the foods, the methods of house-building right, why not the presentation?) That this offering in the series "goes nowhere": The first half carries the slow freight of nailing down where all the important characters of the first eight novels have got to since we saw them last. That feels a lot like drudgery. The second half gets the plot, such as it is, moving in some direction like forward, but not by much, and not steadily. The pace is uneven - lots of space given to the trajectory of Revolutionary War in the abstract, yet a whole pregnancy's-worth of time on Fraser's Ridge collapsed in the gap between one chapter and the next. The shift between one locale another, one group of characters and another goes by like whiplash. The "ending" we rush to for some shred of resolution is merely a pause while we wait expectantly for the 10th book, leaving me feeling a little used and unsatisfied. Number 9 is a bridge between what DG left off saying in Number 8 and what she really wants to say in Number 10. There's not much more to it than that. Therein lies my disappointment with "Bees" and its misleading title. Nobody is "gone" to make the title more than a grab for attention. Nowt happens - though there are intimations of things that might happen, soon, in the next book, maybe... It doesn't stand on its own, it's an attempt to keep us reading a series that is winding down, and it's more of DG's same old stuff. I, for one, had hoped for more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Lee

    Didn't live up I was already incredibly disappointed by the 50% mark of this book. The writer just seems content to allow the plot to ramble on , at times in an incredibly confusing fashion. She doesn't seem sure where the book is meant to go. The main focuses seems to be on constructing prose on the most mundane things imaginable. For a book of over 900 pages, very little happens in this latest installment. By the 80% mark it was disappointingly clear that very little would come of it. For a boo Didn't live up I was already incredibly disappointed by the 50% mark of this book. The writer just seems content to allow the plot to ramble on , at times in an incredibly confusing fashion. She doesn't seem sure where the book is meant to go. The main focuses seems to be on constructing prose on the most mundane things imaginable. For a book of over 900 pages, very little happens in this latest installment. By the 80% mark it was disappointingly clear that very little would come of it. For a book years (YEARS!) In the making I truly thought there would have been more storyline to the actual , well story. Rumor has it there will be a tenth book( hopefully while I'm still young enough and in control of my mental facilities to read it). Hopefully, the focus can be on wrapping up the various plots to a reasonable satisfaction.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eirin Orum

    I finished listening through the audiobook a couple of hours ago, and still feel like crying. But this time the tears are not from actually emoting along with any characters, or from frustration from having to leave them and wait for the next book. This time I fell like crying because Diana Gabaldon has somehow managed to kill the series for me. For so many years, I loved this series. Most of the characters were relatable, even some of the antagonists (but Stephen Bonnet was always a bit of a car I finished listening through the audiobook a couple of hours ago, and still feel like crying. But this time the tears are not from actually emoting along with any characters, or from frustration from having to leave them and wait for the next book. This time I fell like crying because Diana Gabaldon has somehow managed to kill the series for me. For so many years, I loved this series. Most of the characters were relatable, even some of the antagonists (but Stephen Bonnet was always a bit of a cartoon, his psychology was never quite credible). Some of the characters were harder to like, but by the end of the last book, I was cheering hard for Brianna and Roger, who had finally become full people, good and bad, with strong drivers. And then, after an interminable wait, I return to Fraser's Ridge to find minutiae, biblethumping and nothing really happening at all except people travelling all over the place. It feels a bit like Diana saw most of the family gathered and rebuilding their society after several difficult experiences, and then thought: "Can't have that, they might develop as characters through actually interacting, let's throw these ones over here, those over there, and, hm, add a bunch around here. Oh, wasn't I supposed to bring some answers? Well, never mind, I will just remove some of the science and replace it with woo-woo, and give religion the main role in this book!" I wonder if it is possible to love this book if you are not religious? In my case, it made my tendency towards strongly disliking religiosity much stronger, and I doubt that I will be able to ever re-read this book, the way I have with all the previous 8. And where did the guts go? Why push so hard for Agnes and Fanny to go down the traditional route after having given much more exciting alternatives in an earlier case? Why put Lord John back into the same old predicament and kill off one of the more interesting characters in that horrible way instead of showing some personal growth and ability to actually share deep emotions despite the society frowning upon it? Why plopping out babies all over the place, including one to a woman whose heart should have struggled with a pregnancy and birth instead of magically just bearing all of that without any issues, whatsoever? Oh, and if a child does not fit in here, why just drop them in somewhere else and never deal with any of the deep scars such uprooting can lead to? Everything just seem so superficial, so virtuous and so obvious that it never became possible to believe in any of the threatening events. They all travel through war and weather without negative consequences, including some suspiciously easy smuggling, and equally suspicious intercultural understanding and tolerance all over the place, including sitting through three different religious services back to back (recounted in sooooo much detail!) and no problems whatsoever in marrying people of different faiths. Even the great event that we FINALLY get to in the end becomes boring, because anyone with a brain could predict exactly what would be the result after all that foreshadowing! I might read the tenth book, but will definitely not seek it out! After this book, I don't really care what happens to Roger (barf!), Brianna (boooooooring!), Mandy (annoying as hell), Fergus (who no longer has any personality, apparently), Marsali (who is actually reduced to a baby-machine), Ian (who no longer has personality, either, just saintly patience and goodwill to all), Jamie (who has become insufferable in his preaching and "perfection"), Claire (who is apparently now almighty, and at the same time flat and completely uninteresting, how the hell did such a snappish woman become tame?) or even William (who is just a still angsty teenager spewing privilege, yet always right about everything now). The only characters I still feel able to read about are Jemmy and Jenny, whose names are so similar, but still have a little bit of spark left. And I am kinda eager to see the end of the slave who acted so honorably through an entire life, yet in this book became a total villain for no reason. Sigh!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elyse

    Shock shock shocked by the 11/23/21 release date! Thought for sure it was going to be 2022 after she just finished the final draft a week ago. Let's go, editors!! Woohoo! *preordered* Shock shock shocked by the 11/23/21 release date! Thought for sure it was going to be 2022 after she just finished the final draft a week ago. Let's go, editors!! Woohoo! *preordered*

  9. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Update as of 25 Dec 2021... So I've been reading reviews of this book from longtime Outlander fans who were not happy with the quality of the book. I can't say I am surprised, because I went through the same exact thing with Jean M. Auel and her Clan of the Cave Bear series. The first books in both series start off very strong. You are sucked into the world these authors create. So when they write more books, you're happy. I fell in love with Jean M Auel's series and read the five books that at th Update as of 25 Dec 2021... So I've been reading reviews of this book from longtime Outlander fans who were not happy with the quality of the book. I can't say I am surprised, because I went through the same exact thing with Jean M. Auel and her Clan of the Cave Bear series. The first books in both series start off very strong. You are sucked into the world these authors create. So when they write more books, you're happy. I fell in love with Jean M Auel's series and read the five books that at that time were available. As I read the books, I noticed a decline in quality, and a increase in repetition, something that I hear about the later books in the Outlander series. The second-to-last book of the Cave Bear really dragged on, with a lot of fixation on the main character (another complaint I see echoed in reviews for Go Tell the Bees I am Gone) but I was glad when book 6 came out because Ms. Auel had announced it was the final book. However, I was let-down by it, as many of my fellow fans were. So Outlander fans who were disappointed with this book, I feel your pain, because I've been through the same thing with a different author. How much it sucks to invest yourself into a series, only to watch it peter out due to repetition, laziness, the characters becoming Mary Sues, etc... I also experienced much of the same with Anne Rice's vampire series and how she turned Lestat into a Gary Stu. I stand by the original review I wrote for this book way before a release date was even announced, because what I was afraid would happen, DID happen. I know the pain of being disappointed in something you love, and from the criticisms I see of this book, it seems like the final Outlander book is going to be even worse unless Gabaldon gets off her high horse and gets her shit together, or given the increased wait between subsequent books of the series, DG might very well die before she finishes it, just as GRRM might die before he finishes the Song of Ice and Fire series (another series I used to love but grew disappointed in) Books are wonderful, but it's a shame when authors let this happen to their own series and creations. ----- Update as of 24 Sept 2021... When I first wrote my review for this book back in January, I was venting a little because at that time, DG had been putting off the release of this book for years now, and the date and cover had not yet been released. As someone who has (or had, since I've given up now) been waiting for the next Game of Thrones book, it looked like DG had been befallen by the dreaded GRRM syndrome. I had been watching the Outlander series on Netflix and read book 4. So I wrote the following review with that in mind, and did NOT give this book a star rating since I had not read it and did not feel it would be fair, but still had to put in my .02. However, some whiny-ass Karens decided to give me grief over this review, and after the most recent whiny-ass comment, I decided, fuck it, I'll go ahead and give this 1 star. After all, a bunch of people are giving this 5 stars despite not having read it. So yeah, I'm giving this book 1 star. Jamie and Claire need a break already, and I hope they get one in book 9. ----- Original review as of Jan 2021... Methinks it's time to just... wrap things up. Now, I know a fair amount of this author's fans will disagree, hate on me, or dismiss me as a troll. but I need to make it clear that I am not trying to attack the author personally, nor am I giving this book any stars as I have not read it. The one book I did read was Drums of Autumn, which had been given to me as a gift not long after its release by a relative who knew I enjoyed reading and assumed I would enjoy something that was popular. And don't get me wrong, Drums of Autumn was well-researched and written. I DID enjoy it, but did not read any more of the Outlander books because I had plenty of other books in my TBR pile. However, I recently discovered Outlander on Netflix and watched all 4 seasons of it (as of this date) So many fucking twists and turns, so I decided to spoiler myself on the books via some Wikia reading (yes, I am a spoiler hound) and can't help but feel overwhelmed and dismayed at how many times Jamie and Claire keep getting torn apart only to find one another, only to get torn apart fucking again. All of the 8 Outlander books - not including the side-stories - are pretty damn thick novels and I felt exhausted reading about all the twists and turns. It feels too much like the Clan of the Cave Bear series (which I actually read all of them) where the first book was awesome but then the rest of the series went into a decline/drag. Come on, Ms. Gabaldon. Can you just give Jamie and Claire a fucking break? Reunite them and THIS TIME JUST LET THEM STAY TOGETHER. EDIT - This review was written BEFORE the cover and publication date were announced - at that time, I had legit reason to believe that the author was suffering from GRRM syndrome (Game of Thrones reference for those who don't know who GRRM is) I'm pretty tempted to give this book 1 star just because of all the bitches whining and complaining about by review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carol Mills

    I have eagerly read all of Diana Gabaldon's books and watched the series. This book is by far the worst of the lot. It drags on, is repetitive, and just plain dull and boring. It badly needs a good editor and a less self-satisfied author. I feel she is pandering to diehard fans who are in love with the world she has created and are loathe to be critical. These fans don't want the story to end, so she gave them a largely filler book which just prolongs the story without adding anything at all to I have eagerly read all of Diana Gabaldon's books and watched the series. This book is by far the worst of the lot. It drags on, is repetitive, and just plain dull and boring. It badly needs a good editor and a less self-satisfied author. I feel she is pandering to diehard fans who are in love with the world she has created and are loathe to be critical. These fans don't want the story to end, so she gave them a largely filler book which just prolongs the story without adding anything at all to character development, relationships, story arc, or even pure entertainment. It is sad. I am giving away my copy of this book to the first person I can find who wants it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laine

    Tell the Bees that Ms. Gabaldon stayed too long at the fair, placing her iconic characters in repetitive situations in overlong tomes stuffed with minutiae either because she can't bear to say goodbye to Jamie and Claire or the money they bring in or she wouldn't know what to do with herself if she isn't writing about them. The readership that keeps begging her for more of the same, patiently waiting years seem equally emotionally hooked but I broke out of the trance into a more critical stance Tell the Bees that Ms. Gabaldon stayed too long at the fair, placing her iconic characters in repetitive situations in overlong tomes stuffed with minutiae either because she can't bear to say goodbye to Jamie and Claire or the money they bring in or she wouldn't know what to do with herself if she isn't writing about them. The readership that keeps begging her for more of the same, patiently waiting years seem equally emotionally hooked but I broke out of the trance into a more critical stance after book 4 or 5 and stopped reading after 6 or 7, just skimming for plot lines. The latter books sit on my shelf, not really beckoning anymore. I would recommend any lover of romance fiction to read the seminal work Outlander even though the author insists her maiden work along with its sequels is "not a romance". However, observation of long comment threads demonstrates conclusively that her readers or watchers of the TV series who are overwhelmingly female are not feverishly loyal for the background history or lessons in botany. Those just get in the way of their obsession with the main pair or probably more accurately, Jamie - "king of men". A woman who was in her 30's when Outlander came out in 1991 is now in her 60s, ironically aging almost in pace with the characters she adores so their greying hair does not bother her but I wonder about an unwary youngster starting at the beginning, how long she'll binge read when it becomes about Gramps and Grandma Fraser? Most youngsters cringe at senior sex. Then there's the problem of the vast bulk of the series taking place in America during a very well known Colonial epoch so boredom sets in. Rating the series to date, it started out 5 star for me but the author's inability to resist any stray thought in her head thus diluting the power of the admittedly wonderful characters she created, clouding them behind detail merely because she can't bear to let them go is steadily decreasing the rating. It remains to be seen if she manages to stick the ending after a stretched out 10-behemoth build-up or stumble into a disappointing anti-climax. (The TV series Lost comes to mind). Maybe she'll return to 5 stars, but not with this penultimate volume, dedicated to readers so invested in Jamie and Claire it seems possible they'll mourn their eventual loss more than some friends in real life. Well, there's always re-reading...at least the first trilogy!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jenn (The Book Refuge)

    Well... wow. Just wow. 6/5 ... like it could be anything else..

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lucia

    After re-read of book #8 I am more than ready for more. Bring it on Mrs. Gabaldon! I cannot wait. After re-read of book #8 I am more than ready for more. Bring it on Mrs. Gabaldon! I cannot wait.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lana

    I'm highly disappointed in this long-awaited book. While I know Gabaldon doesn't write in a linear fashion, this book seems very disjointed and many scenes were extraneous to any of the story lines. Which is another problem - there are so many insignificant characters from previous books who are reintroduced in this book, but they add nothing to the story (can we please kill off Percy Wainwright yet?). I hate to say it, but I was bored throughout this whole book. Normally I cannot put down an Ou I'm highly disappointed in this long-awaited book. While I know Gabaldon doesn't write in a linear fashion, this book seems very disjointed and many scenes were extraneous to any of the story lines. Which is another problem - there are so many insignificant characters from previous books who are reintroduced in this book, but they add nothing to the story (can we please kill off Percy Wainwright yet?). I hate to say it, but I was bored throughout this whole book. Normally I cannot put down an Outlander book, but this one did not hold my attention at all.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rose

    i’m probably going to get hate for this but, to be perfectly frank, all but the last ~15% and the business with amy was boring. all these stars go to john and william’s portions. this was a disservice to the previous books and to the characters.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    The long wait is finally over. I just love this series. It is 1779, Jamie, Claire, Brianna and Roger and their children are finally reunited on Fraser’s Ridge. I was so happy to be back on Fraser’s Ridge. I was afraid I wouldn’t remember what happen after all this time, but I got right into it. We learn of Brianna’s and Roger’s journey through the stones. Bree brings along a book written by Frank Randall, a history of what is to come. William is still coming to terms with the discovery of his bir The long wait is finally over. I just love this series. It is 1779, Jamie, Claire, Brianna and Roger and their children are finally reunited on Fraser’s Ridge. I was so happy to be back on Fraser’s Ridge. I was afraid I wouldn’t remember what happen after all this time, but I got right into it. We learn of Brianna’s and Roger’s journey through the stones. Bree brings along a book written by Frank Randall, a history of what is to come. William is still coming to terms with the discovery of his birth father Not a perfect book. The first half is a revisit from some of the events that have previously occurred in other books. The second half was more interesting. Some characters were hardly mentioned at all. I would have liked for William and Jamie to have had more interaction with one another. There was however a heart throbbing life or death situation and a cliff hanging ending. All in all I just love reading about Jamie and Claire. I missed it very much. Hopefully the conclusion is not far away.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Roxie Voorhees

    Well that was disappointing 🤨

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone (Outlander, #9), Diana Gabaldon Outlander is a series of historical fantasy novels by American author Diana Gabaldon. Gabaldon began the first volume of the series, Outlander, in the late 1980's, and it was published in 1991. She has published eight out of a planned ten volumes. In March 2021 Gabaldon finished writing the ninth novel, Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone. تاریخ نخستین خوانش عنوان: بیگانه (غریبه)، کتاب نهم: برو به زنبورها بگو که من رفته ام؛ نویسنده: دایا Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone (Outlander, #9), Diana Gabaldon Outlander is a series of historical fantasy novels by American author Diana Gabaldon. Gabaldon began the first volume of the series, Outlander, in the late 1980's, and it was published in 1991. She has published eight out of a planned ten volumes. In March 2021 Gabaldon finished writing the ninth novel, Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone. تاریخ نخستین خوانش عنوان: بیگانه (غریبه)، کتاب نهم: برو به زنبورها بگو که من رفته ام؛ نویسنده: دایانا گبلدون؛ موضوع داستانهای نویسندگان مکزیکی تبار آمریکایی - سده 21م ریویو بزودی اگر زنده ماندم تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 05/02/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dana Ilie

    I impatiently waited for this to come to print and now we begin the wait again for what I believe will be the final installment. Sigh. The nature of reading for me is to become deeply absorbed into the created world so much so that you laugh with them, cry with them, feel the joy and grief and everything in between. The action shifts up and down the Atlantic seaboard, as characters from past volumes reappear, die, are kidnapped, or are healed by Claire's medical knowledge, while new family membe I impatiently waited for this to come to print and now we begin the wait again for what I believe will be the final installment. Sigh. The nature of reading for me is to become deeply absorbed into the created world so much so that you laugh with them, cry with them, feel the joy and grief and everything in between. The action shifts up and down the Atlantic seaboard, as characters from past volumes reappear, die, are kidnapped, or are healed by Claire's medical knowledge, while new family members are born or adopted. Fans of the series should be pleased by new developments, but now must begin the long wait for the conclusion in number 10. Diana Gabaldon is a master at it. I had to take breaks while reads to try to settle from the wealth of emotions this storytelling evoked and yet at the same time needed to know what came next. There are a couple high-tension moments that make me worry for the fate of the Ridge, and a bit more development into speculation as to how the whole time travel thing works. This series started out life I believe as a creating of cross stitch and without doubt all the threads are coming together. A wonderful book I'm sorry to have finished.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Natali Vargas

    3.5, rounded up because it was hard enough not giving an Outlander book 5 stars. 😪 Kills me to say it, but this installment did not measure up to the rest of the series and it has me anxious as heck for the last book. (Please let it be nothing like this one.) The writing did not feel anything like DG’s best, regurgitating/“reminding” us of previous storylines to the point of taking you well out of the moment in this book .. which was easy enough considering the lack of atmosphere (thanks, Rose!) 3.5, rounded up because it was hard enough not giving an Outlander book 5 stars. 😪 Kills me to say it, but this installment did not measure up to the rest of the series and it has me anxious as heck for the last book. (Please let it be nothing like this one.) The writing did not feel anything like DG’s best, regurgitating/“reminding” us of previous storylines to the point of taking you well out of the moment in this book .. which was easy enough considering the lack of atmosphere (thanks, Rose!) that usually draws you into her stories. There were a few trademark moments that made my heart happy, but they were few enough; I found myself bored often, waiting to feel something, anything, really. The length was a crime considering not a whole lot happened + a good 100 or more pages were either devolving into an earlier book’s plot summary or needlessly moving people about. I don’t know what happened with this book, but the characters deserved much better than this. - - .. It’s been three weeks and it feels like I really should make this a 3⭐️, but it huuurts. 🙈 Maybe when I reread it. 😅😩

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    I adored this book. Here is the thing about Outlander. My mom read the books in the late 1990s, and got my grandpa and me both hooked on them. Which means I have been reading these books for at least 20 years (more than half of my life). I love them. I don't just love them -- they're a living part of my life. Now there's the TV show and a lot more people know about them. Which is fantastic! And a lot of people (including the author!) seem to like the show (which is great!) I don't, and here's wh I adored this book. Here is the thing about Outlander. My mom read the books in the late 1990s, and got my grandpa and me both hooked on them. Which means I have been reading these books for at least 20 years (more than half of my life). I love them. I don't just love them -- they're a living part of my life. Now there's the TV show and a lot more people know about them. Which is fantastic! And a lot of people (including the author!) seem to like the show (which is great!) I don't, and here's why. My favorite things in Outlander are not the things that happen but the characters and the way Gabaldon writes about them. From the show, and the "just like Game of Thrones!" advertising around it, people seem to focus on the sex and the violence. However, those, to me, are the least important parts of the books. I read these books because they are wonderful to live in. Honestly, I occasionally skim the sex and violence. Those aren't the heart of the story. Gabaldon is an ecologist, and she writes like one. Her books are rich with detail, with nature, and with the small and wonderful stories that happen all around us all the time. (What shall we make for dinner? Are there enough clothes clean? Is the horse's hoof a disaster or just a rock? Why is the floor so dirty? Did someone let the fire go out?) These intimate details, the tiny bits of historical accuracy, the wonderful way she embraces all her characters: That, to me, is what makes the books worth reading. A lot of people get hung up on reading The Fiery Cross I think because that's where the books start to slow down. It's one of my favorites of the books for that reason. Go Tell the Bees that I Am Gone is in that vein. It's not as breakneck as An Echo in the Bone, and I love it more. I adore these books. I love Gabaldon's work. I love Brianna and Roger and John and Fergus and Marsali and Jenny and William and Ian and Rachel and Claire and Jamie and Lord John and Hal and Clarence the mule, and all the dogs and horses and kids. I love the characters, I love the details, I love the life Gabaldon breathes into the stories. These are some of my favorite books in which to live.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maddie Hoy

    Disappointing I was greatly anticipating the ninth book in the series yet sadly found myself bored at times with the feeling I had read some of the plotlines in earlier books. The ending came as no surprise - I will not include a spoiler but it was obvious the two characters had to meet again one, predictably, needing the help of the other. Perhaps the final book will tie up all the loose ends and provide a decent resolution for these incredible characters. I just hope the author has enough inter Disappointing I was greatly anticipating the ninth book in the series yet sadly found myself bored at times with the feeling I had read some of the plotlines in earlier books. The ending came as no surprise - I will not include a spoiler but it was obvious the two characters had to meet again one, predictably, needing the help of the other. Perhaps the final book will tie up all the loose ends and provide a decent resolution for these incredible characters. I just hope the author has enough interest to see the saga finished.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katie Lawson

    Two days ago, Diana Gabaldon released Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone, the long awaited ninth installment of her popular Outlander series. It’s been more than seven years since the last installment. So, I have been reading and ruminating for approximately 48 hours as I sit down to write this review. I’ve got a good many thoughts about this novel – it is more than 950 pages long on my Kindle, after all – but I’m not sure how many of them I can share without this review becoming nothing but a mine Two days ago, Diana Gabaldon released Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone, the long awaited ninth installment of her popular Outlander series. It’s been more than seven years since the last installment. So, I have been reading and ruminating for approximately 48 hours as I sit down to write this review. I’ve got a good many thoughts about this novel – it is more than 950 pages long on my Kindle, after all – but I’m not sure how many of them I can share without this review becoming nothing but a minefield of spoilers. I’ve decided to make a bullet point list of things that you should know going in. *You’ve watched the show and are now interested in reading the books. Can you start with this or any of the others and read them out of order? NO. ABSOLUTELY NOT. These books are densely plotted with extensive character growth and world building. You’d only be lost. *Honestly, it’s been so long since the last installment, you should probably do a reread of the entire series before tackling this one. There are so many callbacks that are critical to the plot of this one that if you are not up to date or fully immersed in the story that you will only be lost. *Is it a slog like the book that spent three whole days and six hundred pages covering a picnic? No, lots of stuff is happening across a wide variety of plot lines. It might be helpful to keep a list handy to help you keep track. *There is not nearly enough Lord John Grey. That’s all I have to say about that. It feels like everything and nothing are happening at the same time. On to the most important part of any review: did I *like* the book? I’m… I’m not sure. There were some portions that felt like a blow to the stomach. There were other moments that were just lovely. There are also several plot lines that I’m not going to go into that were infuriating, whether it was due to issues with the characters or because of the sheer amount of wtf that occured. Of course there was the in depth attention to historical detail, which was a plus in my book, but is not everyone’s cup of tea. Was this book ever going to live up to my expectations? How could it? I’ve been invested in these people since the 1990s. Ultimately, I think I kind of wish that the series had just ended with that lovely scene at the end of Written in My Own Heart’s Blood.

  24. 5 out of 5

    barelyliterate

    I just wanna say one has to admire Diana Gabaldon's NERVE to write NINE novels about the same pair of characters, who are not getting younger. Or better. Or even changing in any way, to be honest. They reached the absolute perfect relationship in the third book and have just been living Wild Adventures since then, no significant evolution in sight. This is all so tiring for everyone involved. I'm growing tired of reading, people are getting tired of expecting new books, the characters are tired o I just wanna say one has to admire Diana Gabaldon's NERVE to write NINE novels about the same pair of characters, who are not getting younger. Or better. Or even changing in any way, to be honest. They reached the absolute perfect relationship in the third book and have just been living Wild Adventures since then, no significant evolution in sight. This is all so tiring for everyone involved. I'm growing tired of reading, people are getting tired of expecting new books, the characters are tired of existing (I swear I can feel Claire's back aching and Jamie's knees joints getting weaker since book 4). Don't you feel tired too, dear author? Do not put these poor souls through a whole bunch of mischief and adventures all over again, I beg you. Let them (and all of us, too) rest and move on, Diana! ps.: Good lord, Diana! You had nine books to pick a new main character... There were so many good people hanging on from the first 3 books of the series, you know? Why couldn't you give them a good plot? Why did you had to make their lives so uninteresting? It's a true shame.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Briana

    ⏱ Sixty second, no spoiler summary What a ride. This book picks up right away with Bree and Roger and kids meeting with Jamie and Claire. This joyous reunion is soon followed by an unexpected death which causes some anxiety as well as realization that one of the characters has some health concerns. There’s a birth midway through that was exciting to read about (I love a good midwife story). Meanwhile, William is coming to terms with the realization of who he actually is. He’s still on the hunt fo ⏱ Sixty second, no spoiler summary What a ride. This book picks up right away with Bree and Roger and kids meeting with Jamie and Claire. This joyous reunion is soon followed by an unexpected death which causes some anxiety as well as realization that one of the characters has some health concerns. There’s a birth midway through that was exciting to read about (I love a good midwife story). Meanwhile, William is coming to terms with the realization of who he actually is. He’s still on the hunt for his cousin Benjamin as well. We get to revisit with Fergus and family and my favorites: Ian and Rachel. This book spans a large timeframe and almost had me in a tears a few times. It ends on a cliffhanger but not as big of one as the last book. 👍🏻Turn Ons It was so easy to fall right back into Fraser’s Ridge and be surrounded by the characters. I realized while reading this how much has happened over the course of 9 books and it makes me want to go back and reread them all (which I will do eventually). Ian is my favorite character and I love that we got to spend time with him and have some new facts revealed to us as well. 👎🏻 Turn Offs This kind of goes past the fantasy part of time-traveling into more of a supernatural feel. I mean, I know it’s not realistic with the whole time travel part, but the other stuff isn’t my favorite even though it plays an integral part of the plot. Also, I read a review once that Claire says “Jesus H. Roosevelt Christ” waaaaaaaay too many times, so of course it’s in the back of my mind, and yes. Yes, she does. There is also a storyline that pulls from her branch off of John Grey and I haven’t read those so I had to look up some characters as I was reading to figure out who they were. I guess they’re mentioned briefly in other books, but mainly in the other series. I also noticed that there’s an error in the family tree in the back **spoiler** (view spoiler)[ Rachel and Ian finally have an official name for Oggy, but it’s not changed on that family tree. It still says Oggy. (hide spoiler)] 👵🏻 Safe to talk about with Grandma? There is f words and some graphic violence. There is some steamy sex scenes, but not as many and not as descriptive as there has been in prior books. ⭐Rating ⭐ Five stars. This series is captivating and tugs on your heartstrings. You come to love the characters and want to know what happens! It’s going to be a long, long wait for book 10. Title & Author: Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon Format: Hardback Rating: Five stars

  26. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    [stream of consciousness review] This is an incredible (and lengthy) instalment in this saga. DG needs to stop creating new and interesting secondary characters and let us know what happens with the folks she already has us invested in. So many loose ends and questions. Do we have to wait another 7 years for how this all shakes out? Am I the only one who wants to know if Germaine and Fanny are a thing in another 10 years. Arrggghhh. So good, yet more horribly graphic than the previous books. I f [stream of consciousness review] This is an incredible (and lengthy) instalment in this saga. DG needs to stop creating new and interesting secondary characters and let us know what happens with the folks she already has us invested in. So many loose ends and questions. Do we have to wait another 7 years for how this all shakes out? Am I the only one who wants to know if Germaine and Fanny are a thing in another 10 years. Arrggghhh. So good, yet more horribly graphic than the previous books. I feel like my heart was just turned inside out

  27. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    4.5 stars Finally....Book #9 is out. This has been a great series. I think what I like the most about this series is that it is a little romance, a little real life, a little tragic, a little happy, a little political, characters unite, characters are separated....it just never gets boring or lopsided. Do I like some threads better than others? Yes, but I still really like it. The author adds it all and then some. Her books are incredibly chunky, but the beauty is, is that they don't ever feel lo 4.5 stars Finally....Book #9 is out. This has been a great series. I think what I like the most about this series is that it is a little romance, a little real life, a little tragic, a little happy, a little political, characters unite, characters are separated....it just never gets boring or lopsided. Do I like some threads better than others? Yes, but I still really like it. The author adds it all and then some. Her books are incredibly chunky, but the beauty is, is that they don't ever feel long. And hurray that Davina Porter is still the narrator for this series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Linda Galella

    Seven YEARS, Five MONTHS and Thirteen DAYS - the wait is finally over! Roger, Bree and their kids are back on Fraser’s Ridge and America’s war for Independence is looming. Jamie and Claire are thrilled with the return of their family and circumspect about the impending future as the issues attendant to war impact life on Fraser’s Ridge. All the folks I’ve been waiting to hear about arrive during this 900+ page “monster”. It’s a great reunion with new twists, long awaited resolutions, new friends a Seven YEARS, Five MONTHS and Thirteen DAYS - the wait is finally over! Roger, Bree and their kids are back on Fraser’s Ridge and America’s war for Independence is looming. Jamie and Claire are thrilled with the return of their family and circumspect about the impending future as the issues attendant to war impact life on Fraser’s Ridge. All the folks I’ve been waiting to hear about arrive during this 900+ page “monster”. It’s a great reunion with new twists, long awaited resolutions, new friends and a few sad departures. What’s not sad is that after 33 years since being introduced to Jamie & Claire, the story will continue! One brief moment from the book to tantalize: Jamie gets himself into a life and death situation, (like that’s no big surprise), everyone has decided to to transport his body home before the skirmish is over, everyone but Claire; she’s got another idea; also no surprise, or is it?!? Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve heard about THE OUTLANDER SERIES. “ Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone” in book Nine in this remarkable, historical fiction masterpiece. I raced thru, well, because I just had to know what happened after waiting for that interminable expanse of time. Now, I’m going back to savor every word and phrase and begin the longing process all over again; reminding myself to be grateful another “monster” is in the making; Best Book of fiction this year. BTW, “monster” is the descriptor used by DG for these weighty volumes. Make sure to read her notes at the close of this one, even her notes are amazing 📚

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marina Jones

  30. 4 out of 5

    Monica Robinson

  31. 5 out of 5

    Monique

  32. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  33. 5 out of 5

    Tabatha Yager

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kari

  35. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  36. 5 out of 5

    Bri Wedge

  37. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

  38. 4 out of 5

    LD

  39. 5 out of 5

    Robbin SaveLand

  40. 4 out of 5

    Carol

  41. 4 out of 5

    Lacey Hylton

  42. 4 out of 5

    Lise

  43. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  44. 4 out of 5

    KylieVonKittie

  45. 5 out of 5

    Soelo

  46. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Javurek

  47. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Gill

  48. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Musson

  49. 4 out of 5

    Megan Parro

  50. 5 out of 5

    AV

  51. 4 out of 5

    Megan Hood

  52. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  53. 4 out of 5

    Vince Herzing

  54. 5 out of 5

    Angela Frisino

  55. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Parker

  56. 4 out of 5

    Blandine

  57. 4 out of 5

    Sinéad

  58. 5 out of 5

    DEBBAR Selima

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