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Nightwatch on the Hinterlands

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Set in the universe of Rory Thorne, this new standalone sci-fi mystery follows an unlikely duo who must discover the motive behind an unusual murder. THE TEMPLAR: When Lieutenant Iari hears screams in the night, she expects to interrupt a robbery or break up a fight. Instead she discovers a murder with an impossible suspect: a riev, one of the battle-mecha decommissioned a Set in the universe of Rory Thorne, this new standalone sci-fi mystery follows an unlikely duo who must discover the motive behind an unusual murder. THE TEMPLAR: When Lieutenant Iari hears screams in the night, she expects to interrupt a robbery or break up a fight. Instead she discovers a murder with an impossible suspect: a riev, one of the battle-mecha decommissioned after the end of the last conflict, repurposed for manual labor. Riev don't kill people. And yet, clearly, one has. Iari sets out to find it. THE SPY: Officially, Gaer is an ambassador from the vakari. Unofficially, he's also a spy, sending information back to his government, unfiltered by diplomatic channels. Unlike Iari, Gaer isn't so sure the riev's behavior is just a malfunction, since the riev were created using an unstable mixture of alchemy and arithmancy. As Gaer and Iari search for the truth, they discover that the murderous riev is just a weapon in the hands of a wielder with wider ambitions than homicide--including releasing horrors not seen since the war, that make a rampaging riev seem insignificant...


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Set in the universe of Rory Thorne, this new standalone sci-fi mystery follows an unlikely duo who must discover the motive behind an unusual murder. THE TEMPLAR: When Lieutenant Iari hears screams in the night, she expects to interrupt a robbery or break up a fight. Instead she discovers a murder with an impossible suspect: a riev, one of the battle-mecha decommissioned a Set in the universe of Rory Thorne, this new standalone sci-fi mystery follows an unlikely duo who must discover the motive behind an unusual murder. THE TEMPLAR: When Lieutenant Iari hears screams in the night, she expects to interrupt a robbery or break up a fight. Instead she discovers a murder with an impossible suspect: a riev, one of the battle-mecha decommissioned after the end of the last conflict, repurposed for manual labor. Riev don't kill people. And yet, clearly, one has. Iari sets out to find it. THE SPY: Officially, Gaer is an ambassador from the vakari. Unofficially, he's also a spy, sending information back to his government, unfiltered by diplomatic channels. Unlike Iari, Gaer isn't so sure the riev's behavior is just a malfunction, since the riev were created using an unstable mixture of alchemy and arithmancy. As Gaer and Iari search for the truth, they discover that the murderous riev is just a weapon in the hands of a wielder with wider ambitions than homicide--including releasing horrors not seen since the war, that make a rampaging riev seem insignificant...

30 review for Nightwatch on the Hinterlands

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    The nitty-gritty: A complex world full of fascinating characters, Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is an excellent start to a new science fiction series. I was so excited when this book was announced, a story set in K. Eason’s Rory Thorne universe but far in the future with different characters. And wow, was this a lot of fun! Nightwatch on the Hinterlands takes many of the world-building ideas I loved in Rory Thorne and expands on them even more. This is a very tech-heavy, tightly focused story tha The nitty-gritty: A complex world full of fascinating characters, Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is an excellent start to a new science fiction series. I was so excited when this book was announced, a story set in K. Eason’s Rory Thorne universe but far in the future with different characters. And wow, was this a lot of fun! Nightwatch on the Hinterlands takes many of the world-building ideas I loved in Rory Thorne and expands on them even more. This is a very tech-heavy, tightly focused story that falls on the “hard” science fiction side of the spectrum, which doesn’t always work for me. But Eason tempers the technical elements with fascinating world-building, carefully developed characters and plenty of high stakes action, all of which made this a blast to read. The story is set on the remote planet of Tanis and follows several main characters. Lieutenant Iari is a tenju templar, born and orphaned during the Expansion War. Iari joined the templars in order to fight, but now that the war is over, her job is to stop the Brood, the deadly monsters that appeared after the vakari inadvertently created a rip in the void called the Weep. The other main character is Gaer, a vakar ambassador who has been sent to the planet to work with Iari, but who in fact is acting as a spy and is secretly sending critical information back to his people. Iari and Gaer have an uneasy relationship, but when the body of a murdered wichu is discovered, and when witnesses claim that a riev was responsible for the murder, Iari knows something isn’t right. Riev, the giant robot-like creatures that were created during the war to kill the vakari, haven’t been able to kill anything since the war ended, and why would one kill a wichu anyway? Wichu are a peaceful race who use magical arithmancy to repair broken riev, so the reasons behind the murder are a big mystery. Iari takes a chance and decides to question a group of riev in the area where the murder took place, and is shocked to discover a much deeper and disturbing mystery: someone has figured out a way to reprogram riev to kill. With the help of two riev called Char and Brisk Array, Iari and Gaer start investigating the murder, but someone doesn't want them to find out the truth. Readers who love complex worlds will adore this book, and the world-building was by far my favorite part of the story, closely followed by my love of the characters. And do note, if you haven’t read the Rory Thorne books, you can easily start here. Eason imagines a multiverse set far in the future where a mysterious rip in the universe—called the Weep—was accidentally created with magic during the war. The Weep allows a terrible breed of monsters to come through called Brood. There are different types of Brood, like boneless and swarm, and wow were they terrifying! The scenes where Iari and her friends are trying to kill them reminded me of the bone-numbing terror I felt when I watched Alien for the first time.  Then there are the riev, whose original purpose is gone—the war is over and the vakari are no longer the enemy. Char was one of my favorite characters, and I loved the way Eason delves into the moral issues of robots and sentience. Riev were linked together by the Oversight, a network that gave them a hive mind, so to speak. But the Oversight is no longer in use, and a funny thing is happening: Char starts using the “I” pronoun, suggesting that riev are becoming individual entities. I loved seeing Char and Brisk Array develop their personalities over the course of the story, and the fact that Iari has a soft spot for the riev made me like her even more. I also loved the wichu, tiny artificers who love to surround themselves with bright colors. The wichu started out as the enemy during the war, but defected over to the side of the Confederation. I pictured them as Munchkins from the Wizard of Oz, although I’m not sure if that’s what the author was going for! In fact, most of the characters in this story aren’t human. Instead, we have Iari, who is tenju, a rather large humanoid race with tusks, and Gaer, a vakar who is skilled in arithmancy and reading auras. Iari is a devout templar, a religious group whose members are also fierce fighters. Iari has been exposed to fighting her entire life, raised as a war orphan and later as a templar. She’s had a needle socket surgically installed at the base of her skull which monitors her vital signs and communicates with her battle rig during a fight, a highly specialized suit of armor that not only protects the wearer but gives them super strength and speed. Iari takes her job seriously and shakes off injury in order to keep fighting, but she’s sometimes rash and jumps into the middle of the action without thinking things through. I loved Gaer’s character as well. The vakari were enemies of the Confederation until only recently, so he’s still treated with suspicion. I loved his ability to read auras, which is rather intrusive, sort of like reading someone’s mind. There are some funny scenes where he can see Iari’s emotions—the ones she’s trying to hide—but reading auras also comes in handy because Gaer can tell whether or not someone is lying. Gaer is also adept at arithmancy, the ability to see and create magical mathematical equations called hexes, which we were first introduced to in the Rory Thorne series. In Eason’s world, mathematics is used to shape reality, and the multiverse depends on math to keep it in order. This unusual combination of magic and science is one of my favorite elements in the book, and I especially loved that Gaer, whose race is still feared by some people, is one of the most talented arithmancers in the story. A third main character—another tenju named Corso—appears around the 25% mark in the story and joins in the search for the killer. Corso is an old war buddy of Iari’s, and they appear to have some history, but he wasn’t in the story enough for me to really get a feel for him. As for the plot, it’s a fairly simple murder mystery. But what makes this story so complex are all the world-building details and the relationships between the characters. Because there are so many different alien races sharing space, the dynamics among them can get very tense. I especially loved the relationship between Iari and Gaer, which isn’t a romantic one, by the way, although I can see the author going there eventually. Gaer becomes very protective of Iari, and she does not like that at all. I wouldn’t call this story humorous, but there are some very funny scenes between the two, mostly because they are both fighters and Iari doesn’t want anyone seeing her weaknesses. The mystery itself is complicated by the fact that certain species aren’t acting in the normal way, and so the reader slowly begins to understand how they interact with each other: tenju and vakari, tenju and wichu, riev and wichu, riev and vakari. The Brood is their common enemy, so they all end up working together to stop the Brood from swarming. Add in a bunch of political intrigue, which I haven’t even touched on in this review, and you have a dynamic story full of unpredictable characters. The only negative I wanted to mention relates to the author’s narrative style, which tripped me up a bit. In the Rory Thorne books, the story is being told by an unknown narrator who often chimes in with his or her own opinions about what’s happening. It was a little jarring at times and took some time to get used to. In Nightwatch, we mostly bounce back and forth between Iari’s and Gaer’s points of view, and they often insert odd mannerisms into their speech that make it seem like they’re breaking the fourth wall and talking directly to the reader. Eventually I grew to love this quirky style, but some readers might struggle with it. The stakes become higher and higher as the story progresses, with all of the characters in mortal danger at one time or another. By the end of the story, Eason has neatly set up the next book in the series but at the same time satisfactorily resolved all the big plot points. I can hardly wait to read the follow-up! Highly recommended. Big thanks to the publisher for providing a review copy. 

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ola G

    8/10 stars My full review on my blog. An opening to a new series set in the Rory Thorne universe, Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is a fast-paced SF noir mystery inspired by WH40K and D&D, featuring a duo of unlikely allies embroiled in a conflict that starts small but grows exponentially – and quite satisfyingly – throughout the book. I haven’t read the Thorne books, but the author and publisher are adamant that Nightwatch can be read without prior knowledge of the world – and honestly, I think it’ 8/10 stars My full review on my blog. An opening to a new series set in the Rory Thorne universe, Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is a fast-paced SF noir mystery inspired by WH40K and D&D, featuring a duo of unlikely allies embroiled in a conflict that starts small but grows exponentially – and quite satisfyingly – throughout the book. I haven’t read the Thorne books, but the author and publisher are adamant that Nightwatch can be read without prior knowledge of the world – and honestly, I think it’s better this way, because discovering the context and various subtexts is a big part of the fun. There might have been some references to the Thorne books or characters which I missed, but generally the plot of Nightwatch is independent and moved far into the future, with completely new protagonists and problems. The Warhammer inspiration is surprisingly enjoyable, with nanotech-enhanced and devout Templars clad in full-body, mecha-like armor and dedicated to fighting against chaotic Brood swarming out of multi-dimensional fissures in the void (the Weep). The D&D allegiance of Eason is also worn on her sleeve, as Nightwatch’s world is populated with orc-like race of tenju, dragonborn-like race of vakari, gnome-like wichu specializing in artifice, and human-like humans as well as a mysterious and slightly elf-like race of k’bal (there’s also one other race, but it’s only mentioned a few times and I forgot the name ;)). There’s also a separate group which I hesitate to call a race or species – the riev, which seem to be a cross between Frankenstein’s monsters (animated corpses sewn from disparate body parts) and cyborgs, with a rudimentary form of hive mind. Riev were created as a weapon in the war against vakari, and later Brood. Now, decommissioned, they search for a new purpose. Each race has its own culture and aptitudes, and a lot of technological progress among humans and tenju came from the original inequalities between the colonizing dominant race of vakari and the rest. Taking a leaf out of Clarke’s book, Eason depicts magic in her world as a highly advanced mathematical science (arithmancy) to which certain races have more propensity than others. All in all, it’s a refreshing mix, making something maybe not original but at least its own from old tropes and themes. There is a lot of exposition, but to be fair, a lot of it actually comes handy – at least at the beginning. Then it gets too much, but fortunately the repetitions are minimized. The worldbuilding is extensive, and enjoyable, with various factions, plenty of historical and cultural baggage (yes, there was a war on, not that long ago, and now the former enemies must learn to live side by side in the face of greater threat that was a direct result of the war they made), and a lot of stereotypes and general inter-species mistrust that feels quite natural. [...] Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is an enjoyable and satisfying mix of fantasy, light SF, and noir mystery. It takes old ingredients, spices them up with just the right amount of references and nostalgia, garners them with appetizing hints of politics and history, and makes a fresh, tasty dish. Quite a pleasant surprise, indeed! I was hoping for a standalone when I picked it up on NG, but now I’ll be looking forward to the next installment. The cover is pretty neat, too! 🙂 I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Neera

    Thank you to DAW and NetGalley for providing this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review! This was an excellent book with a really good mystery with geat political intrigue and some thriller elements! It was intriguing and suspenseful all the way through, and even the parts without action scenes still maintained the constant tension that made this such a good book. I haven't read the Thorne Chronicles (Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is set in the same universe) so there was definitely a steeper le Thank you to DAW and NetGalley for providing this e-ARC in exchange for an honest review! This was an excellent book with a really good mystery with geat political intrigue and some thriller elements! It was intriguing and suspenseful all the way through, and even the parts without action scenes still maintained the constant tension that made this such a good book. I haven't read the Thorne Chronicles (Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is set in the same universe) so there was definitely a steeper learning curve for me with the worldbuilding, but I thought it was all explained very well without any info dumps and it wasn't hard to pick up the details that you need to understand what's happening. One of my favourite things about this book was that even though humans were present in the story, none of the main characters were human. A lot of sci-fi books that I've read that have humans in them tend to focus on the humans, and the alien characters often end up as secondary or tertiary characters, so it was a really great and very welcome change to read a book that didn't do that. The physiologies of the tenju, vakari, and wichu were all really interesting and distinct and well explained, and it was really interesting to get different perspectives on how much these physiological differences are understood by other species. Iari and Gaer were both such great characters, it was very enjoyable to read this story through their perspectives. The characterisation of the non-POV characters through their perspectives was also done really well: Char, Tobin, Iffy, Luki, and all of the other secondary and tertiary characters were all fully fleshed out. The system of arithmancy in this book was so interesting, and the parameters were very well established. Religion plays a larger role in this book than I usually see in sci-fi but it wasn't intrusive and it fitted into the world really well. The ending of this book wrapped up the story really well but also left enough open to give the reader an idea of how the story will continue in the next book. I can't wait for the next one to see how the story continues and to learn more about arithmancy and this super interesting world!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Arina

    This book was a pleasant surprise and a lesson in going with your gut and taking a chance on spin-off series! I haven't read the other books in this universe, but now I certainly mean to, so not only did this spin-off standalone make me excited about exploring the Rory Thorne universe, it stands well enough on its own to build an intriguing world with one of the most creative magic systems I've read and compelling characters to fear and root for. Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is a murder mystery This book was a pleasant surprise and a lesson in going with your gut and taking a chance on spin-off series! I haven't read the other books in this universe, but now I certainly mean to, so not only did this spin-off standalone make me excited about exploring the Rory Thorne universe, it stands well enough on its own to build an intriguing world with one of the most creative magic systems I've read and compelling characters to fear and root for. Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is a murder mystery about a law enforcer specializing in multidimensional rifts and an alien spy ambassador with a secret mission. As they come together, they must investigate a curious case that hints at the reemergence of long-shut dimensional doors which once threatened to destroy the world. Delving deeper into the murders committed by the battle-mecha that by all means should not be capable of such acts, Iari and Gaer fear the reemergence of another war. A couple more POV characters join the fold later on, but their addition isn't jarring as these insertions tend to be, in fact, they add multitude to the perspective we get from each scene and tune up the terror in clever ways. Besides having a fantastic cast, this plays so well with science, melding the latter into its magic system and political worries. Its magic system is founded on mathematics, as "it's the language of the multiverse", its equations shaping reality. Arithmancers and alchemists can take that potential and use it as a weapon, playing with all manners of being and state. Turning our knowledge of science into fictitious magic was a touch of genius and made for impactful action scenes. There's a hint of Hellboy II: The Golden Army in the fights, probably because of the battle-mecha who are going berserk killing people. This book was something special and one of my favorite reads of 2021. Really recommend it to anyone who loves exploring the lines between science fiction and fantasy (the way they sometimes melt together beautifully), non-human mcs, complex worldbuilding, imaginative magic systems, and heart-pounding action!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sieger

    Book Review: Nightwatch on the Hinterlands by K. Eason 4/5🌟 I recieved an e-arc from DAW books in return for an honest review. Nightwatch on the Hinterlands feels like a scifi noir detective novel. It is a fast paced ride through a complex alien society, packed full of action and politics. In this novel you follow the unlikely pair, Iari and Gaer. Two aliens👽 on opposing political factions who stumble upon a murder on a backwater planet.🌏 Whilst investigating, they quickly get pulled into a hidden p Book Review: Nightwatch on the Hinterlands by K. Eason 4/5🌟 I recieved an e-arc from DAW books in return for an honest review. Nightwatch on the Hinterlands feels like a scifi noir detective novel. It is a fast paced ride through a complex alien society, packed full of action and politics. In this novel you follow the unlikely pair, Iari and Gaer. Two aliens👽 on opposing political factions who stumble upon a murder on a backwater planet.🌏 Whilst investigating, they quickly get pulled into a hidden plot that might have dire consequences for the entire universe. When I say this book is fasted paced, I mean it. The investigation takes place at a rapid pace, pulling us from frantic action scene to frantic action scene. This made me stay engaged the whole trip and everything felt really high stakes. The world is quite complex featuring several alien races, a unique mix of technology and magic and a complex history. All this is wonderfully described without feeling like an information dump. I loved visualising everything, especially Gaer a vakari bird/lizard alien.🦎 Apparently this book falls in the same universe as The Thorne Chronicles which I haven't read, but I did not have the feeling I was missing something. The numbers based magic/science is very cool and blends the fantasy with the scifi genre in a unique way. It also has the awesome Templars who wear mechanical armor linked to their bodies. I couldn't stop imagining everyone looking like knightlike versions of Halo's Masterchief. I would even go as far as to recommend this book to people who normally read fantasy. Oh did I also say it features killer cybors?!🤖🗡 All in all a very accessible, quick and most of all unique read! Thanks again Netgalley, K Eason and DAW books for providing me with this copy!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    essentially a better, well-written Ready Player One

  7. 4 out of 5

    Susanna

    Nightwatch on the Hinterlands (Weep 1) by K. Eason is sci-fi set in the same universe as her earlier Rory Thorne series. Not having read that, I can’t say if characters from it make an appearance, but the plot doesn’t hint at a connection and the book can easily be read as a standalone. That said, the first part of the book seemed to assume a greater knowledge of the world than this reader had. It took a while to get into, but it didn’t slow down the reading much. However, I still have some quest Nightwatch on the Hinterlands (Weep 1) by K. Eason is sci-fi set in the same universe as her earlier Rory Thorne series. Not having read that, I can’t say if characters from it make an appearance, but the plot doesn’t hint at a connection and the book can easily be read as a standalone. That said, the first part of the book seemed to assume a greater knowledge of the world than this reader had. It took a while to get into, but it didn’t slow down the reading much. However, I still have some questions about the appearances of various species and the location of B-town. The book is set on a remote, unremarkable planet called Tenhu. The only thing that makes it interesting is the Weep, a huge fissure in space to another dimension that runs through it. Deadly creatures called the Brood bleed from there, which requires a constant presence of Templars to make sure they don’t get out. The world is a combination of (mostly) low-tech sci-fi and high fantasy. There’s space travel and nanotech, which gives strength to and heals the Templars, but hexes are used for powering their armour. Arithmancy and other spells are used in battle (the Weep was created by a massive spell). The town where the events take place doesn’t have any transportation and people walk everywhere, which gives it a fantasy feeling. Both sides, sci-fi and fantasy, go together seamlessly and make an interesting and unique whole. Iari is a Templar of a large, tusked species native to the planet called tenju. She’s been relegated to babysitting Gaer, an ambassador from the vakari, an insectoid species with highly advanced arithmancy (they’re responsible for the Weep). The vakari used to be the enemy before the Brood became the common threat, and Gaer is the only representative of his species on Tenhu. He’s also a spy. Both have their own point of view chapters, and I found them interesting and likeable characters. Iari is a highly dedicated Templar with a tight moral core, even if she has a habit of questioning her orders. Gaer was a unique character with his arithmancy and ability to read auras. The third point of view character, Corso, was a down on his luck PI and Iari’s former commander. He was a good addition, even if his POV chapters were mostly plot-related. Nightwatch on the Hinterlands is a murder mystery that gains larger proportions. An artificer of a species called Wichu, who are responsible for the technology and magic that powers the templars, is killed. The killer seems clear: a riev. They’re battle-mechas, constructs that are part (dead) people of different species, part mechanic, and also Wichu creations. As the first on the crime scene, Iari and Gaer begin to investigate. From the start they run into anomalies. Riev aren’t supposed to kill. They’re not supposed to have singular identities or individual desires, but they do. One of them, Char, even ends up as part of Iari’s team and was one of my favourites. But the anomalies don’t end there. They run into Brood that act as if they’re being commanded. But who’s commanding them and why? This was a slow but enjoyable mystery with bursts of violent action. All its elements stem from the unique features of the world, which makes the story feel organic and interesting. The motivations of the killer remained a mystery though, but the next book will be about that. I’m looking forward to reading it. I received a free copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mary Soon Lee

    [Potential bias alert: I know the author a little.] This novel begins a new arc with new characters set in the same multiverse as the author's duology "The Thorne Chronicles." Where the earlier duology combined space opera with retold fairy tale, this book has a noir thriller feel: dark urban streets with menace aplenty. I liked it very much. While it is very far from a copy of the Murderbot stories by Martha Wells, it shares some of that verve, and, in one of its plot threads, a concern for bein [Potential bias alert: I know the author a little.] This novel begins a new arc with new characters set in the same multiverse as the author's duology "The Thorne Chronicles." Where the earlier duology combined space opera with retold fairy tale, this book has a noir thriller feel: dark urban streets with menace aplenty. I liked it very much. While it is very far from a copy of the Murderbot stories by Martha Wells, it shares some of that verve, and, in one of its plot threads, a concern for beings that are part-organic, part-construct, stripped of rights. First and foremost, which is true also of Eason's other work, I loved the characters, both the protagonists and the supporting cast. The narrative switches between two major and one supporting point-of-view characters. There's Lieutenant Iari, a templar sworn to defend against the (terrifying) Brood. There's Gaer, an ambassdor and arithmancer from the species Iari's side formerly fought against in a bitter war. There's Corso, once Iari's sergeant, now a civilian investigator. None are human, but all are essentially human. All three are great, though I have a special soft spot for Gaer. The characters are great, but it is the interactions between the characters, their chancy friendships that are best of all. The story is compelling and atmospheric, throwing the reader headlong into its world from the first page. The prose is alive with wit, but never undermines its characters. The action scenes are flamboyant and distinctive. I love Eason's depiction of arithmancy -- also prevalent in "The Thorne Chronicles" -- as something that straddles the border between math and magic. Four out of five arithmantic stars. About my reviews: I try to review every book I read, including those that I don't end up enjoying. The reviews are not scholarly, but just indicate my reaction as a reader, reading being my addiction. I am miserly with 5-star reviews; 4 stars means I liked a book very much; 3 stars means I liked it; 2 stars means I didn't like it (though often the 2-star books are very popular with other readers and/or are by authors whose other work I've loved).

  9. 4 out of 5

    Henry Lazarus

    K. Eason tells a blow-away tale of high-tech magic in the far future. A generation before, during a major battle, one side opened a hole in the multiverse letting out brood monsters attacking planets for many light-years around the fault. The templars were formed to fight the Brood and stand Nightwatch on the Hinterlands (hard from DAW). The tale starts with a zombie cyborg leftover from the war, a Riev. Even though programmed against violence, this one has murdered an artificer. Enter Templar L K. Eason tells a blow-away tale of high-tech magic in the far future. A generation before, during a major battle, one side opened a hole in the multiverse letting out brood monsters attacking planets for many light-years around the fault. The templars were formed to fight the Brood and stand Nightwatch on the Hinterlands (hard from DAW). The tale starts with a zombie cyborg leftover from the war, a Riev. Even though programmed against violence, this one has murdered an artificer. Enter Templar Lieutenant Iari who likes to work with her counterpart Gaer, an ambassador from the Vakari ( the beings who had created the warp in space) and probably a spy. There’s another artificer creating portals to the Bloom and subverting Riev programming. This is an edge-of-your-seat exciting tale set in a very unusual universe. I hope it finds its way to awards.Review printed by Philadelphia Free Press

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katie Mercer

    I haven't read the Thorne Chronicles, so please contextualize my review within that. This book took a little work to get into, but again, maybe that's because I started with a strange place mentally with regards to the worldbuilding, mythology, and context. That said, when I got into it this book was absolutely excellent - and honestly a good reminder of how much I miss reading science fiction. This book was really close to fantasy with some of the mythology elements, and I really loved how they I haven't read the Thorne Chronicles, so please contextualize my review within that. This book took a little work to get into, but again, maybe that's because I started with a strange place mentally with regards to the worldbuilding, mythology, and context. That said, when I got into it this book was absolutely excellent - and honestly a good reminder of how much I miss reading science fiction. This book was really close to fantasy with some of the mythology elements, and I really loved how they kind of blurred some boundaries (though make no mistake, this is very sci fi in nature). It's a fun partnership, and this book made it really difficult to figure out what happens next, which makes reading it really fun. Really solid plot, great characters and generally a really strong read. ARC from NetGalley.

  11. 5 out of 5

    richardrpjasper.org

    Starts with a bang... And never slows down. Frankly, I could have dealt with a little less action and more world-building but the characters (at least four different species) are all engaging, believable and memorable. It pains me to think that the Vakar, who seem to be sort of like giant beetles, have to worry about how their intelligence work is going to be received by a COMMITTEE. Just goes to show alien DNA isn't an adequate defense against the laws of entropy! Glad this one will continue! Starts with a bang... And never slows down. Frankly, I could have dealt with a little less action and more world-building but the characters (at least four different species) are all engaging, believable and memorable. It pains me to think that the Vakar, who seem to be sort of like giant beetles, have to worry about how their intelligence work is going to be received by a COMMITTEE. Just goes to show alien DNA isn't an adequate defense against the laws of entropy! Glad this one will continue!

  12. 5 out of 5

    wanderonwards

    I have now thoroughly enjoyed all three K. Eason books I've read! However, I would definitely recommend reading the Rory Thorne duology before picking up this book: the events in Nightwatch on the Hinterlands happen generations after the conclusion of Rory Thorne and build off of the terminology, species, and world building introduced in the first duology. I have now thoroughly enjoyed all three K. Eason books I've read! However, I would definitely recommend reading the Rory Thorne duology before picking up this book: the events in Nightwatch on the Hinterlands happen generations after the conclusion of Rory Thorne and build off of the terminology, species, and world building introduced in the first duology.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    #NightwatchontheHinterlands #NetGalley IF you loved Rory Thorne then I think you will enjoy this novel. It is a wonderful addition to the world of Rory Thorne. K. Eason has a wonderful way of bringing characters to life in your head! Please read this one, so much adventure!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Fun enable cast, continues great world building from Rory Thorn books, awesome plot with twists and turns and I can't wait to read the next one. K. Eason is getting better by the book and working her way into my list of always must read authors. Fun enable cast, continues great world building from Rory Thorn books, awesome plot with twists and turns and I can't wait to read the next one. K. Eason is getting better by the book and working her way into my list of always must read authors.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I really enjoyed this book. Good story, engaging characters, interesting setting and world-building. I'm a bit disappointed it didn't go deeper into the horror aspect of the Weep and the Brood, but hopefully the next one will. Definitely recommend for anyone looking for a good scifi. I really enjoyed this book. Good story, engaging characters, interesting setting and world-building. I'm a bit disappointed it didn't go deeper into the horror aspect of the Weep and the Brood, but hopefully the next one will. Definitely recommend for anyone looking for a good scifi.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vega

    this was fun from start to finish. it had me truly invested and wanting to read more.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Really enjoyed this book and I'm really hoping for more in this universe. I like the mix of space travel and hex magic Really enjoyed this book and I'm really hoping for more in this universe. I like the mix of space travel and hex magic

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Loved it, one of the best I've read all year. Loved it, one of the best I've read all year.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brody Garcia

    Deep sci-fi, super interesting, but would have loved to see the world used more.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kayla (krakentoagoodbook)

    Even though I've read the Rory Thorne books, this felt a bit confusing with the worldbuilding. I think this book takes place some time after the others, but I'm not entirely sure. I was confused about the different alien races as well and had trouble keeping track of them. Interestingly enough, this does have a different writing style compared to Rory Thorne because this book isn't told by the Chronicler. It's less of a stream of consciousness/long-winded style here which I think will actually b Even though I've read the Rory Thorne books, this felt a bit confusing with the worldbuilding. I think this book takes place some time after the others, but I'm not entirely sure. I was confused about the different alien races as well and had trouble keeping track of them. Interestingly enough, this does have a different writing style compared to Rory Thorne because this book isn't told by the Chronicler. It's less of a stream of consciousness/long-winded style here which I think will actually be more readable for most people. The book was decently paced overall, but I just wasn't super invested in the story for whatever reason, perhaps because I didn't connect with the characters. I felt just okay about the mystery itself, though I did like a subplot with the riev (these battle mechas) because it's sort of a "how do you define sentience/humanity" type of plot. But generally speaking, I felt like I was just missing something with this story. I didn't really connect to the characters here, unlike the Rory Thorne books. We have a Templar, Iari, who fought in the war. I did like like how she wanted to investigate things to protect her city. We also have Gaer, an ambassador for the Vekari which are looked down on and hated because of previous wars. Gaer doesn't shy away from helping with the investigation, even though people don't necessarily welcome his help. He's an arithmancer, so I loved getting to see some of this again since it's basically like magic math. I also continue to enjoy how it can be used to read people's auras where different colors represent different emotions. This was such a cool part of the Rory Thorne books, and I was happy to see it again here, though it wasn't as present as I would have liked. In general, this was fine, but I still vastly prefer the first Rory Thorne book (perhaps because of the fairy tale retelling aspect that really works for me). I don't think you necessarily have to read those books before jumping into this, especially because they feel very different. While this wasn't my favorite, I would still recommend it to those looking for a sci-fi mystery. I received a copy of this for review from the publisher via NetGalley - thank you! All opinions are my own.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Brynn Walsh

    Wasn’t expecting to like this book nearly as much as I did! It was written from two different perspectives which I really enjoyed. I haven’t read any of the other books from this World, but that didn’t prevent my enjoyment at all! Very excited to read the follow up novels and eventually the other books in the universe. Very much recommend :))

  22. 5 out of 5

    David

    Relentless forward momentum from start to finish. I know the characters and situation are new, but can’t recall how much the Rory books set up the various races, though I do recall a smidge of the math-magic.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lauralyrics

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cats

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  27. 4 out of 5

    Okcrow

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

  29. 4 out of 5

    James Farner

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shari Loe

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