Hot Best Seller

Somebody Loves You

Availability: Ready to download
 

A teacher asked me a question, and I opened my mouth as a sort of formality but closed it softly, knowing with perfect certainty that nothing would ever come out again. Ruby gives up talking at a young age. Her mother isn’t always there to notice; she comes and goes and goes and comes, until, one day, she doesn’t. Silence becomes Ruby’s refuge, sheltering her from the weath A teacher asked me a question, and I opened my mouth as a sort of formality but closed it softly, knowing with perfect certainty that nothing would ever come out again. Ruby gives up talking at a young age. Her mother isn’t always there to notice; she comes and goes and goes and comes, until, one day, she doesn’t. Silence becomes Ruby’s refuge, sheltering her from the weather of her mother’s mental illness and a pressurized suburban atmosphere. Plangent, deft, and sparkling with wry humour, Somebody Loves You is a moving exploration of how we choose or refuse to tell the stories that shape us.


Compare

A teacher asked me a question, and I opened my mouth as a sort of formality but closed it softly, knowing with perfect certainty that nothing would ever come out again. Ruby gives up talking at a young age. Her mother isn’t always there to notice; she comes and goes and goes and comes, until, one day, she doesn’t. Silence becomes Ruby’s refuge, sheltering her from the weath A teacher asked me a question, and I opened my mouth as a sort of formality but closed it softly, knowing with perfect certainty that nothing would ever come out again. Ruby gives up talking at a young age. Her mother isn’t always there to notice; she comes and goes and goes and comes, until, one day, she doesn’t. Silence becomes Ruby’s refuge, sheltering her from the weather of her mother’s mental illness and a pressurized suburban atmosphere. Plangent, deft, and sparkling with wry humour, Somebody Loves You is a moving exploration of how we choose or refuse to tell the stories that shape us.

30 review for Somebody Loves You

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheri

    3.5 Stars ’Silence is the universal refuge, the sequel to all dull discourses and all foolish acts, a balm to our every chagrin, as welcome after satiety as after disappointment; that background which the painter may not daub, be he master or bungler, and which, however awkward a figure we may have made in the foreground, remains ever our inviolable asylum, where no indignity can assail, no personality can disturb us.’ ― Henry David Thoreau The author, Mona Arshi, was a Human Rights lawyer before 3.5 Stars ’Silence is the universal refuge, the sequel to all dull discourses and all foolish acts, a balm to our every chagrin, as welcome after satiety as after disappointment; that background which the painter may not daub, be he master or bungler, and which, however awkward a figure we may have made in the foreground, remains ever our inviolable asylum, where no indignity can assail, no personality can disturb us.’ ― Henry David Thoreau The author, Mona Arshi, was a Human Rights lawyer before publishing ’Small Hands, her poetry collection which won the Forward Prize in 2015. This is her fiction debut, one which focuses on silence, the things that create that belief that we need to keep silent - mental health, family, physical and sexual assault, and more. It is heartbreaking at moments, but beautifully heartfelt and intensely felt by the reader. I listened to this novel, narrated by the author which made these stories feel that much more authentic and which brought this collection and the portraits of these people vividly to life. This isn’t a light and fluffy collection, it is often profoundly disturbing, but it is, or seems to be a realistic portraiture of the affect that assault, physical violation, mental health have on one’s personal life and family. Memories that can haunt one throughout their lives. A beautifully written, heartbreaking and powerful story. Published: 16 Nov 2021 Many thanks for the ARC provided by Saga Egmont Audio #SomebodyLovesyou #NetGalley

  2. 5 out of 5

    RoshReviews

    In a Nutshell: I tried my best to like this book but it just wasn’t the right fit for me. (Partly because I went for the audiobook. More on this below.) Story: (I have no idea how to summarise this plot! There is no plot progression!) Ruby has given up talking. Her elder sister, more outgoing and bombastic in her nature, does more than her fair share of it. And even her busy parents talk enough. You see, Ruby defines everyone around her in terms of their quantum of verbosity. And she has decided t In a Nutshell: I tried my best to like this book but it just wasn’t the right fit for me. (Partly because I went for the audiobook. More on this below.) Story: (I have no idea how to summarise this plot! There is no plot progression!) Ruby has given up talking. Her elder sister, more outgoing and bombastic in her nature, does more than her fair share of it. And even her busy parents talk enough. You see, Ruby defines everyone around her in terms of their quantum of verbosity. And she has decided that she needn’t add more talk to this world. But how does this stance impact those around her? That’s all I can say. There’s really nothing more to it. The narrative contains Ruby’s interactions with her kith and kin, and her personal thoughts on various topics. The book is written in Ruby’s first person perspective, so it’s kind of ironic that she’s speaking to the reader without speaking to anyone around her. It makes you feel like you are reading the innermost thoughts of a young girl who is misunderstood by all around her. This is supposed to be a work of literary fiction so I was kind of prepared for the slower pace and character-oriented narrative. Both of which are dominant factors in this novel. But what I didn’t expect was the plot to be randomly structured with short chapters in the form of reminiscences and opinions rather than a linear narrative. This would have worked fabulously had I read it. But when you hear the content, the plot doesn’t make much sense and it takes a while, if at all, to get into it. I still trudged through somehow to the end, hoping for a satisfactory ending if not a happy one. But even that was denied me. I can make out the quality of the writing. The author has a fair grip on where she wants the story to go, even if it is not directly evident to us. The language is very poetic and the emotions, hard-hitting. There are many complicated themes such as racial diversity, immigrant issues and parent expectations highlighted in the tale. But all these points are moot if the narration doesn’t help you get into the story. The audiobook is read by the author herself, and I’m very sorry to say this, but while she has a clear reading voice, it isn’t exactly conducive to an audiobook. Her tone is slightly hushed and lulling, not exactly the kind to keep you hooked onto a narration of a literary book. I kept tuning out and this 4 hour audiobook took me much longer to complete. Basically, all my complaints stem from the fact that the audiobook doesn’t really work for this story. It might be a power-packed emotional experience but none of it was apparent in the audio form. Recommended only if you want to READ a somewhat depressing literary fiction. My thanks to Saga Egmont Audio and NetGalley for the ALC of “Somebody Loves You”. This review is voluntary and contains my honest opinion about the audiobook. Sorry this didn't work out better for me. *********************** Join me on the Facebook group, Readers Forever! , for more reviews, book-related discussions and fun.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul Fulcher

    The mother sleeps. Mostly. The foxes still come and go. It’s March but it’s been snowing. Up until last week we were still leaving milk and chicken bones out for them; my father can’t bear the sound of their suffering. Just last week he took us to visit our mother, our feet crunching the icy ground beneath us. They had taken her out of bed, and she was waiting for us patiently, her elbows scrubbed but dry with a bubbly texture. I reached over and touched one with my fingertips. Mona Arshi's debut The mother sleeps. Mostly. The foxes still come and go. It’s March but it’s been snowing. Up until last week we were still leaving milk and chicken bones out for them; my father can’t bear the sound of their suffering. Just last week he took us to visit our mother, our feet crunching the icy ground beneath us. They had taken her out of bed, and she was waiting for us patiently, her elbows scrubbed but dry with a bubbly texture. I reached over and touched one with my fingertips. Mona Arshi's debut novel comes with a stunning cover design from Holly Ovenden and is published by And Other Stories, who have wonderfully described their output as shamelessly literary. We are an independent, not-for-profit publisher of innovative contemporary writing from around the world ... And Other Stories publishes some of the best in contemporary writing, including many translations. We aim to push people’s reading limits and help them discover authors of adventurous and inspiring writing. The novel's title comes from the closing lines of Elizabeth Bishop's poem Filling Station. And I emphasise debut novel as Arshi is an established poet, her debut collection winning the Forward Prize for best first collection in 2015. And in 2021 she was writer-in-residence at the nature reserve in Cley Marshes Wildlife Reserve in North Norfolk: At Cley nature reserve a single raised path separates the salt marshes from the freshwater wetlands, and the shifting sounds of the Norfolk reed. When you begin the walk by the visitor’s centre the traffic from the road fills your ears. Then, as you begin to enter the marshes this recedes to be replaced by the sound of the reeds. Everyone tells you about the big Norfolk skies but in this place the big sky is like a giant dynamic canvas. In your peripheral vision a flicker of a tail wing disturbs your eye, in your central vision a flinty white object is thrown into relief against the blue. Then there are the sounds of Cley as you lose the noise of the road to gently tune in; the reeds hush over you and the reed warblers twitch as you push forwards trying to capture it all. Soon enough you find yourself at the other end, standing on the shingle beach in front of the churning dark waters of the North Sea. When I last visited it was September, a real time of transition. Many migratory birds had already gone and those wintering in Cley were arriving. We spotted geese, the pink-footed kind, arriving from Iceland announcing their arrival. We saw the common graylag but then unexpectedly a kestrel and red shanks. The salt marshes were now lit with samphire but when I’d last visited in July it was sea-lavender. The novel's text is as lyrical as this background might lead one to expect, starting with the opening chapter, "Eggs", which reads A man is offering her a bowl. She peers inside and there is an egg nestled in light peat close to the surface. It is a small blue egg – perfect and complete. She gently lifts it out of the bowl and places it in her mouth and the egg, still warm, breaks onto her tongue, makes her retch a little but still she swallows it. She closes then reopens her eyes and a blue bird escapes from her mouth. Then another and another, until the room is filled with their iridescent turquoise feathers and clamour of yellow-black beaks. A few settle on her head, others perch on her shoulders, but then after a few minutes and for no discernible reason they quickly flit back inside – a hymn of bodies returning as they enter back through her parted lips. Several fly into and penetrate her torso. When the last bird has gone, she closes her mouth and leaves the room. The next chapter, Foxes, begins with the memorable (and much quoted in reviews, including this) line: The day my sister tried to drag the baby fox into our house was the same day my mother had her first mental breakdown. The novel is narrated by Ruby, a girl whose mother emigrated from India to the UK. Ruby herself settles, as a young schoolchild, for silence, refusing to speak (the 'Eggs' chapter symbolising the act), as she explains: The first time I spoke out loud at school I said the word sister and tripped all over it. I tried a second time, and my tongue got caught on the middle-syllable hiss and hovered there. The third time? A teacher asked me a question, and I opened my mouth as a sort of formality but closed it sofly, knowing with perfect certainty that nothing would ever come out again. I was certain about this the next morning and even more certain about it the day following that. I uttered absolutely nothing. It became the most certain thing in my life. Her and her family's (father, mother and old sister, as well as various relatives) story is told in a series of brief, non-linear, vignettes. Ruby may be silent, but she is a strong willed character (Ruby's Spotify playlist) and her tale includes: - her mother's mental health issues: When the garden’s asleep for winter, when there’s nothing to nurture, nothing to fight for or revive on the borders, when my mother has put away her tools and potting soil in our shed, that strange look of blank hunger takes up residence. These are the beginnings of Mugdays. Mugdays start with unpredictable and approximate mornings. Simple things, like getting out of bed and into some fresh clothes, eating and drinking, have to be gently negotiated, navigated and pleaded for. - the casual racism she experiences (this from a Norfolk-based penpal) Two days after I turned twelve my pen pal Clare told me we could no longer be friends. Dear Ruby, I am really sad and sorry, but my dad has said I have to send you this letter and tell you I’m not allowed to be your pen friend anymore because he found out you’re a Paki. I am feeling sad that you might be sad about this – I am so sad and sorry that we can’t be friends anymore. From Clare. There were no kisses. She had carefully underlined the ‘sad’s using a ruler, but there was no pink-lined paper with cutesy animals crowded into the corner, and the perfunctory white envelope which was the repository for this four-line note contained no stickers, tattoos or glitter, and just like that my two-month correspondence with Clare Marjorie Stokely, from Diss, Norfolk, ended. - her own self-revulsion when, driven by jealousy, she sends a racist letter of her own: All the way back on the bus ride the empty pocket of my jacket was seeping out its disgust. I felt hot and conspicuous and guilty. But also, I felt exhilarated, powerful and ungovernable – the perfect conditions for psychopathy to flourish. In the windows of the bus my eyes surprised me, looking like cool, glassy pebbles and not the eyes of a frightened cat. I wanted to go home and scrub every part of my body, like the expensive murderesses do in art-house films before they themselves are strangulated by their lovers with their own suede belts or silk scarves. I wanted to be clean, but I also wanted to stay with the filth, stand in the wuthering dirt of it all. I wanted to feel this way; I didn’t want to feel this way - and the sexual assault of her sister by a neighbour's relative. A memorable narrator and a beautifully constructed novel. Recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    I'm surprised by how much I enjoyed this hybrid novel about a South Asian girl's life in England told in short vignettes. Surprised because I usually read genre and because I wouldn't think I would enjoy the short glimpses of memory, bur Arshi is a powerful writer, and the disjointed memories actually seemed more realistic for how a child would make sense of their life. I'm surprised by how much I enjoyed this hybrid novel about a South Asian girl's life in England told in short vignettes. Surprised because I usually read genre and because I wouldn't think I would enjoy the short glimpses of memory, bur Arshi is a powerful writer, and the disjointed memories actually seemed more realistic for how a child would make sense of their life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anoud

    Many thanks to Netgalley and Saga Egmont Audio for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review. 2.5 I feel bad for not liking this book, I had trouble picking it up after I stopped, and it took too long to finish for a short book, I usually like these genres but I could tell it wasn't for me from the beginning, I should have dnfed it but I soldiered on because I thought it might get better for me, but, unfortunately, it was sad and depressing and not what I needed at the time I pic Many thanks to Netgalley and Saga Egmont Audio for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review. 2.5 I feel bad for not liking this book, I had trouble picking it up after I stopped, and it took too long to finish for a short book, I usually like these genres but I could tell it wasn't for me from the beginning, I should have dnfed it but I soldiered on because I thought it might get better for me, but, unfortunately, it was sad and depressing and not what I needed at the time I picked it up. So, I skimmed it. Don't get me wrong, this book was well written and the audiobook was phenomenal, I believe it might be a favorite of so many readers, but, not me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Haak

    Beautiful and poetic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Khione♔

    Thank you so much to Netgalley and Saga Egmont Audio for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was a book very different form what I am used to as a reader, and I have to say that It felt really nice to change it up. I am not used to non/fiction, for some reason I really never resignate with the stories, but this one made me feel like I was in our main character’s shoes. It is quite a heartwarming story in which we are inside of this girl’s head as she takes us along he Thank you so much to Netgalley and Saga Egmont Audio for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was a book very different form what I am used to as a reader, and I have to say that It felt really nice to change it up. I am not used to non/fiction, for some reason I really never resignate with the stories, but this one made me feel like I was in our main character’s shoes. It is quite a heartwarming story in which we are inside of this girl’s head as she takes us along her journey. The audiobook was exceptional, the narrator made me feel like I was in the story and not outside from it. It was sad and harsh at times so it really got to me. Even tho this was a good one, I do feel like it would not be for everyone. The pacing did felt slow at times and like we were stuck in time a bit. That is one of the reasons why I wasn’t able to give it a higher rating. However, the writing was so beautifully done that made me just keep listening. Overall it was a great read to disconnect and live through someone else’s eyes! #SomebodyLovesyou #NetGalley.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Khione♔

    This was a book very different form what I am used to as a reader, and I have to say that It felt really nice to change it up. I am not used to non/fiction, for some reason I really never resignate with the stories, but this one made me feel like I was in our main character’s shoes. It is quite a heartwarming story in which we are inside of this girl’s head as she takes us along her journey. The audiobook was exceptional, the narrator made me feel like I was in the story and not outside from it. This was a book very different form what I am used to as a reader, and I have to say that It felt really nice to change it up. I am not used to non/fiction, for some reason I really never resignate with the stories, but this one made me feel like I was in our main character’s shoes. It is quite a heartwarming story in which we are inside of this girl’s head as she takes us along her journey. The audiobook was exceptional, the narrator made me feel like I was in the story and not outside from it. It was sad and harsh at times so it really got to me. Even tho this was a good one, I do feel like it would not be for everyone. The pacing did felt slow at times and like we were stuck in time a bit. That is one of the reasons why I wasn’t able to give it a higher rating. However, the writing was so beautifully done that made me just keep listening. Overall it was a great read to disconnect and live through someone else’s eyes! #SomebodyLovesyou #NetGalley.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    I didn't know what to expect from this novel as I was given it without much preamble. Thankfully, it is gorgeous. The novel is a collection of vignettes that are masterfully written and read like interconnected prose poetry. It is lyrical and melancholy in a manner that emulates the main character's chosen silence. The reader is treated to seeing the world in the way Ruby sees it, without the benefit of commentary. Highly intriguing! And it makes the dialogue, which is sparse and smart, even more I didn't know what to expect from this novel as I was given it without much preamble. Thankfully, it is gorgeous. The novel is a collection of vignettes that are masterfully written and read like interconnected prose poetry. It is lyrical and melancholy in a manner that emulates the main character's chosen silence. The reader is treated to seeing the world in the way Ruby sees it, without the benefit of commentary. Highly intriguing! And it makes the dialogue, which is sparse and smart, even more meaningful. There were so many surprising relationships, wonderful moments of deep character revelations, commentary of being foreign and fitting in (or not) with suburban society, and resolve throughout. We see Ruby and Raina come of age against the backdrop of their mother's mental illness and their father's absence? inability to cope? resignation? confusion? (all of the above?) and it is heartbreakingly beautiful.

  10. 5 out of 5

    gabby .__.

    kinda, almost 3.5 stars? with my new ~2022~ rating method. first of all, gorgeous cover, really fits the garden theme the book has going. loved the premise, and mona arshi's prose is gorgeous and poetic. every so often, she writes these little sentences that just take your breath away like little revelations. but-- i struggled to follow the narrative and its pacing despite liking the vignette format. i loved the subtlety and gentleness of arshi's tone when she discusses ruby's mum's mental health kinda, almost 3.5 stars? with my new ~2022~ rating method. first of all, gorgeous cover, really fits the garden theme the book has going. loved the premise, and mona arshi's prose is gorgeous and poetic. every so often, she writes these little sentences that just take your breath away like little revelations. but-- i struggled to follow the narrative and its pacing despite liking the vignette format. i loved the subtlety and gentleness of arshi's tone when she discusses ruby's mum's mental health, and i especially enjoyed the chapters about losing childhood friends and coming to terms with adolescence. some of the other chapters didn't resonate as strongly though. cool first read of the year though!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Caroline D'cruz

    I'm not the one for audiobooks as well as this type of genre, but somebody loves you by Mona Arshi did work for me. I liked that the book was narrated by the author herself. She does have the power to pull her audience in. The narration was soothing to the ear and clear as well. The book is a collection of vignettes of a girl named Rudy who gives up talking at a very young age. Sparkling and heartbreaking with a wry humour the stories are a emotional riot. A sure recommended book if you are some I'm not the one for audiobooks as well as this type of genre, but somebody loves you by Mona Arshi did work for me. I liked that the book was narrated by the author herself. She does have the power to pull her audience in. The narration was soothing to the ear and clear as well. The book is a collection of vignettes of a girl named Rudy who gives up talking at a very young age. Sparkling and heartbreaking with a wry humour the stories are a emotional riot. A sure recommended book if you are someone who loves poetry and prose. Thanks to the Netgalley, the publishers Saga Egmont Audio and Author Mona Arshi for this Arc.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Justice Simanek

    SOMEBODY LOVES YOU by Mona Arshi tells the story of a girl who does not speak. Written in short vignettes, this quick read navigates topics of mental health, parenthood, racism, and the power of voice. I’ve never read anything quite like this before, but there is no doubt that Mona Arshi is a wonderful writer. Her descriptions are lush even though the book is only 170 pages with each chapter just a few pages each. However, because it is so short and spans about ten years of time, I was left conf SOMEBODY LOVES YOU by Mona Arshi tells the story of a girl who does not speak. Written in short vignettes, this quick read navigates topics of mental health, parenthood, racism, and the power of voice. I’ve never read anything quite like this before, but there is no doubt that Mona Arshi is a wonderful writer. Her descriptions are lush even though the book is only 170 pages with each chapter just a few pages each. However, because it is so short and spans about ten years of time, I was left confused on more than one occasion. That can always be the fault of the reader and not the writer, though. Thank you to Net Galley and Saga Egmont Audio for this advance listener’s copy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Hollen

    2.75 stars

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... I couldn’t wait to read this slim volume when it arrived. I loved the title and cover. I’ve also read other books from the publisher so knew I was in for a treat. Somebody Loves You is not a novel in the conventional sense, more of a series of vignettes. There’s no plot to speak of. The mostly short chapters are narrated by Ruby talking about her life, her selective muteness, her feelings, the important things in her life and her complicated family. The st https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... I couldn’t wait to read this slim volume when it arrived. I loved the title and cover. I’ve also read other books from the publisher so knew I was in for a treat. Somebody Loves You is not a novel in the conventional sense, more of a series of vignettes. There’s no plot to speak of. The mostly short chapters are narrated by Ruby talking about her life, her selective muteness, her feelings, the important things in her life and her complicated family. The style is a variation of stream-of-consciousness and the language and images used is very poetic. I fell in love with Ruby and her life. I thought this was a terrific book. I will definitely check out the author’s poetry collections.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cajsa

    Somebody Loves You takes us through Ruby's story in short vignettes that depict her life growing up. The themes addressed in this title range from mental illness to racism and classism and are dealt with in beautiful prose. While the fragmentary style provides the reader with many angles and glimpses at Ruby's life, it did not totally work for me on Audio unfortunately. Had I been reading the physical book I probably would've read most sentences at least twice to really grasp everything that tra Somebody Loves You takes us through Ruby's story in short vignettes that depict her life growing up. The themes addressed in this title range from mental illness to racism and classism and are dealt with in beautiful prose. While the fragmentary style provides the reader with many angles and glimpses at Ruby's life, it did not totally work for me on Audio unfortunately. Had I been reading the physical book I probably would've read most sentences at least twice to really grasp everything that transpired. I'm also not sure if this book will stay with me for long, as I cannot help but feel I didn't really connect with the characters due to the vignette format. For the at times flowery writing alone I will be picking up anything Arshi puts out next, but rather in written form than in a spoken format, albeit the author who narrates this herself did a superb job in bringing the story to life! Thank you so much to Netgalley and Saga Egmont Audio for the listening copy!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Linda McCutcheon

    Somebody Loves You by Mona Arshi is a lyrical story of Ruth who has chosen as a young child to be mute in the world. As we learn about Ruth's reasons we enter her world filled with the noise of people in pain. The author also narrates Ruth's journey which lends a poignancy to Ruth's inner thoughts. It gave me chills to realize we are hearing Ruth's conscious since she does not speak. Told as Ruth's observations about everything from mental illness, physical and mental abuse, race, love and thankf Somebody Loves You by Mona Arshi is a lyrical story of Ruth who has chosen as a young child to be mute in the world. As we learn about Ruth's reasons we enter her world filled with the noise of people in pain. The author also narrates Ruth's journey which lends a poignancy to Ruth's inner thoughts. It gave me chills to realize we are hearing Ruth's conscious since she does not speak. Told as Ruth's observations about everything from mental illness, physical and mental abuse, race, love and thankfully hope. At times a bit meandering but still poetic. I received a free copy of this audiobook from Saga Egmont via #netgalley for fair and honest review. All opinions are my own.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shatterlings

    The language got this book an extra star as disjointed stories told in vignettes are not really my thing. I liked Ruby but you don’t get much sense of the other characters apart from her sister. It also seemed quite exotic and I kept forgetting it was set in England, and I don’t really know when it was set. So yes I mostly liked the poetic flow of the language.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    No word wasted. Precise, good.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    [1 Star] This was not the right book for me. While the writing was quite surreal and even beautiful at times, my engagement was at rock bottom the whole way through. I didn't care about the plot or characters and found the inclusion of certain events to be a bit gratuitous. I personally wouldn't recommend this, but I do expect it could work for readers with different tastes than I [1 Star] This was not the right book for me. While the writing was quite surreal and even beautiful at times, my engagement was at rock bottom the whole way through. I didn't care about the plot or characters and found the inclusion of certain events to be a bit gratuitous. I personally wouldn't recommend this, but I do expect it could work for readers with different tastes than I

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lady reading365

    This audiobook was amazing. This wonderful collection of stories follow a girl who can not speak and all the problems in her life some are rather devastating. The book was read by the author and she was amazing and brought so much life to the story. This literary fiction was so well wrote it brought laughter and chills, so many emotions held within each word. You instantly form a connection to the characters. The author worked wonderfully to incorporate details from everyday life. Writing about This audiobook was amazing. This wonderful collection of stories follow a girl who can not speak and all the problems in her life some are rather devastating. The book was read by the author and she was amazing and brought so much life to the story. This literary fiction was so well wrote it brought laughter and chills, so many emotions held within each word. You instantly form a connection to the characters. The author worked wonderfully to incorporate details from everyday life. Writing about difficult issues such as rape and racism. I was left feeling like the main character was also autistic with all the different mannerism and thoughts etc. The cover is beautiful, this alone made me want to read this book. The story-line maybe a little disjointed but this made me feel it was the point the author was making about the main character and adding to the way she is. It didn't leave me confused and was in no way boring or depressing. The authors use of words and lifting her tone really made the books atmosphere wonderful. I would like to thank both the author and publishers for bringing thisperfect novel to life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    mel

    Format: audiobook Author: Mona Arshi ~ Title: Somebody Loves You ~ Narrator: Mona Arshi Content: 4 stars ~ Narration: 5 stars Complete audiobook review This is quite a unique work of fiction. Short and powerful vignettes that melt into a novel. Just like pieces of poems, words carefully chosen to sound just right. I’ve read a few similar works, where poems form a novel. But this one is still pretty unique in style. Through these vignettes author tells us a story about Ruby and her family. Beautiful a Format: audiobook Author: Mona Arshi ~ Title: Somebody Loves You ~ Narrator: Mona Arshi Content: 4 stars ~ Narration: 5 stars Complete audiobook review This is quite a unique work of fiction. Short and powerful vignettes that melt into a novel. Just like pieces of poems, words carefully chosen to sound just right. I’ve read a few similar works, where poems form a novel. But this one is still pretty unique in style. Through these vignettes author tells us a story about Ruby and her family. Beautiful and sometimes heartbreaking. I didn’t know what to expect. But in the end, I liked it. Narrated by the author, which is very good. Her voice is calm, and it suits these vignettes. Thanks to Saga Egmont Audio the for the ARC and the opportunity to listen to this! All opinions are my own.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anita Salát

    I absolutely adore the book cover. It's a beauty, and appropriate to this unique novel. Don't expect a linear plot. This book is made up of chapters of various length, some of them are really short, and they feel like excerpts from the diary of a young girl. Living in a Pakistani family in London, one day Ruby chooses not to speak, and instead she is sharing with us her thoughts and feelings through this book. Her mother is suffering from mental illness which of course affects the life of each fa I absolutely adore the book cover. It's a beauty, and appropriate to this unique novel. Don't expect a linear plot. This book is made up of chapters of various length, some of them are really short, and they feel like excerpts from the diary of a young girl. Living in a Pakistani family in London, one day Ruby chooses not to speak, and instead she is sharing with us her thoughts and feelings through this book. Her mother is suffering from mental illness which of course affects the life of each family member. Ruby faces racial discrimination, falls in love, and in general has to cope with every aspect of being a teenager. As adults, we tend to forget how difficult it is to be a child and what an emotional rollercoaster adolescence is. Delicate prose, almost like poetry, narrated by the author herself in the audio book. This was a very interesting read, I enjoyed listening to the audio version. Many thanks to NetGalley and Saga Egmont Audio for this Advance Review Copy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    I could heavily relate to the struggle of wanting to please and fit into a multigenerational immigrant family with mental health struggles (as most people who have immigrated will tell you is true), so listening to the narrator recount Ruby's thoughts and feelings on her surroundings was beautifully explored. Ruby is mute, but she is in no way silent as the world around her still turns; she engages with every piece of herself and ensures that while she may be overlooked by those who think she ca I could heavily relate to the struggle of wanting to please and fit into a multigenerational immigrant family with mental health struggles (as most people who have immigrated will tell you is true), so listening to the narrator recount Ruby's thoughts and feelings on her surroundings was beautifully explored. Ruby is mute, but she is in no way silent as the world around her still turns; she engages with every piece of herself and ensures that while she may be overlooked by those who think she cannot contribute verbally, her being is enough. With Ruby being mute in mind, the author's works became more creative as they built up the world and showed how mental illness differs from disabilities and neglect. I give this book 3.5 stars.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Ortiz

    Beautiful

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hayley

    Thank you to Netgalley and Saga Egmont Audio for providing me with this audiobook to listen to in advance of its release! This story is a bit difficult to summarize, as a large aspect of it is its lacking linearity (I never really felt certain if that was a purposeful effect, or me not being able to follow). Ruby, the protagonist, decides at a young age to stop speaking. So she moves throughout this book recounting to the reader (but not aloud to her peers) anecdotes and defining moments of her Thank you to Netgalley and Saga Egmont Audio for providing me with this audiobook to listen to in advance of its release! This story is a bit difficult to summarize, as a large aspect of it is its lacking linearity (I never really felt certain if that was a purposeful effect, or me not being able to follow). Ruby, the protagonist, decides at a young age to stop speaking. So she moves throughout this book recounting to the reader (but not aloud to her peers) anecdotes and defining moments of her childhood/adolescence as she deals with being ostracized for her lack of speech, and being the daughter of a mentally ill woman. There were two major issues for me, despite the writing of this being crisp, engaging and occasionally upsetting (intentionally). Firstly, this is clearly a book that suffers in audiobook form. This was meant to be read from the page, not listened to. I think I would have been able to follow a lot easier, and reread more closely, passages on the page, as opposed to the audiobook version. The benefits and enjoyment derived from an audiobook are lost when there isn't a solid reference point to follow— and I say this as someone who listens to audiobooks often. The second issue is an addendum to the first, and I already hinted at it: the narrative structure is confusing. I get the sense that the effect that is meant to be achieved is one of a sort of continuous dreamlike state, and gentle but also visceral vignettes of the sharp memories of Ruby's life. This certainly works as a literary concept, of course, but in this form, it was difficult for me to establish connections or visualize the world when it felt that the timing and chronology of the scenes were so vague. Overall, these issues were large and impacted my experience greatly. As I said, the writing is strong, and the narrating was clear as well, but there was also an utter lack of clear resolution or finality. And that is perhaps a silly nitpick to pull, as any story could have an open ending because that is the most realistic kind of ending one could give a story. But in this case, it felt a bit blunt, and like the story was just left at a random moment. There are many things that never recurred or were never explained, and again, I don't believe those things are owed to the reader every time, but already with my difficulty in connecting to the story, this left me feeling like I had missed something. The poetic language would have had a stronger impact if the story felt clearer and more cohesive.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ellie Hawkes

    Somebody Loves You is, on the surface, deceptively simple: Ruby, a young girl who has given up speech and exists in a quiet world of her own making, shuffles through childhood memories, making beautiful vignettes of piecemeal moments – chapters are often only a page or two long, and the scenes jump back and forth through time. In some ways, this is an intimate story of a family and its struggles, and the relationship between Ruby and her sister is particularly poignantly depicted. However, like N Somebody Loves You is, on the surface, deceptively simple: Ruby, a young girl who has given up speech and exists in a quiet world of her own making, shuffles through childhood memories, making beautiful vignettes of piecemeal moments – chapters are often only a page or two long, and the scenes jump back and forth through time. In some ways, this is an intimate story of a family and its struggles, and the relationship between Ruby and her sister is particularly poignantly depicted. However, like Natasha Brown’s novel, this book is no simple domestic drama. The forces that press down on Ruby and her family are elemental in scope, and there are moments where the universe seems to crack and split and everything at once pours out. The shadows of racism, of mental illness, of suppressed trauma, thicken and swirl around the edges of the story, and it is an immensely powerful piece of work. But there is also quiet beauty, lines of poetic prose which delicately enter the veins, so subtle and true and precise that even though the book is short, I spent a long time on each section, immersing myself in the words. This is a book that throbs and hums with the power of language. The fact that Ruby, who does not speak, is the one to lead us through it, left me with a really strong sense of both sadness (the ones whose voices are most worth listening to are so often the ones who are unheard) and also hope: powerful words don’t have to be loud and brash, they can be quiet and beautiful and all the more meaningful for that. I can guarantee I will be rereading this book, as I feel I have barely scratched the surface, and that it will have something more to offer on each reading. I can’t recommend it enough.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anastasiia

    The first chapter was not "Eggs", the first chapter was the cover of the book for me. The simplistic, but intricate at the same time, I kept looking into it trying to guess what kind of story am I going to commit to in a moment. I didn't guess, because there is not really a story as such. There is a collection of memories and thoughts of the protagonist Ruby, who refused to talk. Sometimes I glimpsed the flow of narrative somewhere there, like some animal trail. There, but easy to miss. Mostly I co The first chapter was not "Eggs", the first chapter was the cover of the book for me. The simplistic, but intricate at the same time, I kept looking into it trying to guess what kind of story am I going to commit to in a moment. I didn't guess, because there is not really a story as such. There is a collection of memories and thoughts of the protagonist Ruby, who refused to talk. Sometimes I glimpsed the flow of narrative somewhere there, like some animal trail. There, but easy to miss. Mostly I couldn't tell if what it happening if the chapters progress chronologically, or jump back into the past. It was easy to read because the book consists of short bursts of texts. It was hard to read because it's filled with metaphorical descriptions and heavily disguised hard topics. Racism, immigrant life, mental and physical health, ableism, depression, hardships of motherhood. Those are key concepts I carried out from this experience. The colorful cover of the book was somewhat misleading. It is not a bad book. Somehow, even the absence of story doesn't prevent you from binge reading it. But it's not as good as I expected it to be, seeing as it is a London Review of Books book box choice of the month.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ana Lana

    (I received an ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion.) This book just wasn't for me, sorry! I normally would explain here what the book is about, but I'm honestly not even sure... It's a narration of the life of a girl (who doesn't speak) and her family. I think that's all I can say. I listened to the audiobook in a couple of days, but honestly I didn't feel any interest for the characters nor the plot. It's divided in many short chapters, which made it lighter to r (I received an ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for my honest opinion.) This book just wasn't for me, sorry! I normally would explain here what the book is about, but I'm honestly not even sure... It's a narration of the life of a girl (who doesn't speak) and her family. I think that's all I can say. I listened to the audiobook in a couple of days, but honestly I didn't feel any interest for the characters nor the plot. It's divided in many short chapters, which made it lighter to read, but I feel like it lacked structure or connection between the stories. I really liked a couple of chapters that touched on difficult topics (mental illness, rape, death...), but I didn't care for the rest of them. Nevertheless, I did really enjoy the poetic writing style of the author, as well as how good she was at conveying emotion. I think I would have liked this book much better if I had gone for a physical copy instead of the audiobook, but who knows?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    I received this book as an Advanced Reader Copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I genuinely wanted to like this audiobook. I listened to the whole thing, from beginning to end, waiting to like it, and it just never happened. It's not offensive, the writing isn't terrible, and the plot itself isn't uninteresting, but the story itself was so extremely bland and boring that I literally had to actively make myself focus, otherwise it felt like my brain was going numb. It's a shame, I received this book as an Advanced Reader Copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I genuinely wanted to like this audiobook. I listened to the whole thing, from beginning to end, waiting to like it, and it just never happened. It's not offensive, the writing isn't terrible, and the plot itself isn't uninteresting, but the story itself was so extremely bland and boring that I literally had to actively make myself focus, otherwise it felt like my brain was going numb. It's a shame, because some of the wording that the author used was beautiful and the plot itself was interesting. That can't change the fact that it was one of the most dull things that I have ever read, however. I really hope that this book finds its audience and does well. I don't wish it ill. It is simply not for me.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lanette Sweeney

    A series of beautifully written, interconnecting vignettes about a young girl who decides to stop speaking, this book did not hang together well enough as a novel for me. I craved more plot and had trouble keeping up with where we were in the author's story. This may have been made more difficult by the fact that I was listening to the book as an audiobook (narrated by the author, a former human rights lawyer). I feel guilty that I am giving up (I always feel guiltier when it's a story about ano A series of beautifully written, interconnecting vignettes about a young girl who decides to stop speaking, this book did not hang together well enough as a novel for me. I craved more plot and had trouble keeping up with where we were in the author's story. This may have been made more difficult by the fact that I was listening to the book as an audiobook (narrated by the author, a former human rights lawyer). I feel guilty that I am giving up (I always feel guiltier when it's a story about another culture as I love the learning literature brings), but I just can't make myself keep listening. I don't know what I'm waiting for: is the narrator going to speak again someday? I guess I'll never know.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.