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Die, Vol. 4: Bleed

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We've had dragons. The award-winning bleak deconstruction couldn't end without turning its unblinking eye upon a dungeon. There's no escape. There's only down. Collects issues #16-20 of DIE. We've had dragons. The award-winning bleak deconstruction couldn't end without turning its unblinking eye upon a dungeon. There's no escape. There's only down. Collects issues #16-20 of DIE.


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We've had dragons. The award-winning bleak deconstruction couldn't end without turning its unblinking eye upon a dungeon. There's no escape. There's only down. Collects issues #16-20 of DIE. We've had dragons. The award-winning bleak deconstruction couldn't end without turning its unblinking eye upon a dungeon. There's no escape. There's only down. Collects issues #16-20 of DIE.

30 review for Die, Vol. 4: Bleed

  1. 5 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    "A dream is no escape. It was a dream to think it could be." If you haven't been on board for Die, the finale won't change your opinion. Like much of the series, it struggles to achieve the emotional depth and complexity that Gillen sees himself. In some ways, it feels like Gillen forgets that the nuances he sees in his story and its players aren't automatically present on the page. That's been true for the entire series, and it remains the case here, as the conclusion to this tremendously ambiti "A dream is no escape. It was a dream to think it could be." If you haven't been on board for Die, the finale won't change your opinion. Like much of the series, it struggles to achieve the emotional depth and complexity that Gillen sees himself. In some ways, it feels like Gillen forgets that the nuances he sees in his story and its players aren't automatically present on the page. That's been true for the entire series, and it remains the case here, as the conclusion to this tremendously ambitious story resolves on the same trajectory it started on. It's not a surprising ending, but for me, it's a stellar one. I have plenty of qualms with Gillen's writing and not infrequently struggle to get invested in his storytelling style. But with Die, I so wanted access to the world he and Hans had concocted that I muscled my way in, re-read arcs as needed, and essentially forced my way into a narrative that sometimes pushed me away. With this final arc, Gillen shows all his cards, which I found to be remarkably satisfying, especially for a writer as fond of mystery as him. This is a neat conclusion, against all odds. Not an entirely happy one, obviously, but it understands its characters and offers them the closure they deserve, for better and worse. It often moved me, it occasionally frustrated me, and it left me both satiated and discontent. But that's what I want from most stories, honestly. I want them to leave me unsatisfied on some level because that's what life is, and fiction that captures the messy, frustrating parts of life is the fiction that often resonates with me the most. I am very confident in saying this is my favorite project from Gillen, and while I think Wicked + Divine will probably (and rightfully) go down as his magnum opus, there's something richer about what he does with Die that will linger with me. But you can't talk about Die without talking about its art, as Hans has consistently delivered some of the most revelatory spreads in the market. Some of her expressions aren't as crisp as I might've liked, but her understanding of body language is arguably unparalleled. Whenever Gillen's script can't entirely unlock an emotional moment, Hans' artwork will often make up the difference with its stunning flourishes of color and line and momentum. Die is a comic you feel as much as read, and that's entirely on account of Hans' artwork. Some of the dramatic moments in this finale are among her best—issue 19 is the best one in the series and one of the best single issues of a comic I've read in a long time—but it's the intimate moments that struck me the most. There's a gentleness to her work here that, while consistent with her style, is more pronounced than earlier, as Hans' draws her characters with an air of added vulnerability that completely aligns (and magnifies) with the work Gillen does with his scripts. I read this final arc as single issues, and I continue to love the unique experience that Gillen has created by ending each installment with an essay or interview. It acts as an interstitial between story beats that allow the audience to process the events that have just taken place—which is especially relevant and appreciated in these pages—while also offering them a path that leads deeper into the themes and motivations the series reckons with. I can't imagine reading the series without them. So yeah, this is great. I look forward to owning a fancy compendium of the series that allows me to admire it on my shelf and, as needed, reenter its worlds when I am inevitably led back to them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Marie

    An excellent ending. The artwork in this series has been a feast for my eyes, and the story came together in the end in a most satisfying manner.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    A mostly great finale to a story and world I’ve loved spending time in. These issues conclusively wrap up an impressive number of lingering threads; that can sometimes feel like loose ends being tied up more than the natural pacing of the earlier issues, but I appreciated its journey and where it ends up. Gillen is prone to dialogue sections that read like him speaking instead of his characters or otherwise being a little too cutely meta, and that’s especially present in the last couple issues h A mostly great finale to a story and world I’ve loved spending time in. These issues conclusively wrap up an impressive number of lingering threads; that can sometimes feel like loose ends being tied up more than the natural pacing of the earlier issues, but I appreciated its journey and where it ends up. Gillen is prone to dialogue sections that read like him speaking instead of his characters or otherwise being a little too cutely meta, and that’s especially present in the last couple issues here, but what he’s saying about games and fantasy worlds is interesting enough that I’m mostly a fan of it. The literary allusions and literal author inclusions are a treat again (and particularly Lovecraft and Fellowship-focused this time); that’s one of the elements I’m most sad there won’t be more of with this series finished. Hans’s art continues to be incredible. A few more mundane pages and facial expressions look a little sloppier than usual, but her digitally painted art is distinctly gorgeous and I’m excited to see what she works on next.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Always hard to stick the landing on these intriguing series that start with novel concepts. This one wasn’t that satisfying but the journey was interesting and illuminating. Liked learning about the history of gaming and hg wells and lovecraft.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Josh Brown

    Hard to end something as expansive as this in a short time, but bringing it back to the main characters was the right way to do it. And now that it's over, this is officially the most consistently beautiful comic I've ever read. Hard to end something as expansive as this in a short time, but bringing it back to the main characters was the right way to do it. And now that it's over, this is officially the most consistently beautiful comic I've ever read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    My score might go up if I ever do a binge re-read of the series - I think each volume is too dependent on the ones before it to have read so sporadically. This book ends the series and provides a strong sense of closure, giving meaning to all that has come before it while also recontextualizing things yet again. There's a density of themes and meanings here that would probably reward a reread. The plot moves forward to an earned conclusion, but I feel like our characters could have used even mor My score might go up if I ever do a binge re-read of the series - I think each volume is too dependent on the ones before it to have read so sporadically. This book ends the series and provides a strong sense of closure, giving meaning to all that has come before it while also recontextualizing things yet again. There's a density of themes and meanings here that would probably reward a reread. The plot moves forward to an earned conclusion, but I feel like our characters could have used even more time to develop - this series laid the groundwork for several more volumes to flesh out the world, the characters, and everything in it, but it feels a bit rushed to get to its conclusion. The best aspect of the book is a toss-up between the still stunning artwork and the very informative back matter, which goes to some strange topics that are RPG-adjacent, but make for worthwhile reads. All told the series doesn't quite live up to the expectations set by the first volume, but I would still recommend it to anyone who has an interest in Role Playing, especially anyone who is deeply into that world. Between the sheer imagination, the historical aspects, the world building, the character building, and the gorgeous art, any rushed endings are a small price to pay for the trek.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Raechel

    I love the meta-commentary about RPGs and how they're basically social therapy. Great series, though I wish there wasn't so much focus on Ash so that the other characters could shine. I love the meta-commentary about RPGs and how they're basically social therapy. Great series, though I wish there wasn't so much focus on Ash so that the other characters could shine.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Karissa

    Series Info/Source: This is the 4th and final volume in the Die graphic novel series. I bought this book. Thoughts: This was yet another fairly disappointing ending to a graphic novel series. This had a very cliche' open-ended of ending. This is the third graphic novel series I have finished this month where you have this ambiguous and very unsatisfying type of ending. The ending here felt really rushed. I also felt like we picked up some time after Vol 3 and that some things that happened in that Series Info/Source: This is the 4th and final volume in the Die graphic novel series. I bought this book. Thoughts: This was yet another fairly disappointing ending to a graphic novel series. This had a very cliche' open-ended of ending. This is the third graphic novel series I have finished this month where you have this ambiguous and very unsatisfying type of ending. The ending here felt really rushed. I also felt like we picked up some time after Vol 3 and that some things that happened in that “in-between” time were missing from the story. As a result, the reader is left to kind of assume what happened between Vol 3 and 4. This volume has Ash and crew back together as a party and heading into the heart of Die. There we find out what happened to Sol and how Die was created. There are again a lot of gaming references but the world is more Lovecraftian in nature this time around, so there is more discussion of Call of the Cthulhu and those types of RPGs. There are also a lot of rather corny LoTR references. The whole explanation behind Die felt really forced and contrived to me and I found the whole thing fairly unsatisfying. However, it does tie up some loose ends and I continued to enjoy all the artwork. While I am happy to have finished the series, I think I could have just read the first volume of this series and been happy...it went downhill from there. My Summary (3/5): Overall I would tentatively recommend this series if you are super into RPGs and want to read a mediocre graphic novel series that deals with that subject matter. This was creative and I liked the concept; however it oscillates between hard to follow and just plain silly and the ending was pretty lame. I liked the artwork though.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    For me, this was a deeply satisfying conclusion to a beautiful, but challenging, series. In this final arc, the adventurers (forty-somethings trapped in a fantasy world that had already trapped them decades before) delve into the final dungeon, face personal challenges, explore the role of horror in fantasy, and have meaningful conversations about why fantasy, and fantasy games, even exist. I want to go back and read again from the beginning, knowing what I know now about the characters, the wor For me, this was a deeply satisfying conclusion to a beautiful, but challenging, series. In this final arc, the adventurers (forty-somethings trapped in a fantasy world that had already trapped them decades before) delve into the final dungeon, face personal challenges, explore the role of horror in fantasy, and have meaningful conversations about why fantasy, and fantasy games, even exist. I want to go back and read again from the beginning, knowing what I know now about the characters, the world, and its origins; the mysteries of earlier volumes make a lot of sense in retrospect. The volume ends with more interviews with people in the world of gaming, and their perspectives are fascinating -- gaming zines in the 70's, immersive live-action games, setting boundaries and creating collaborative stories, and the explosive growth of online-games-with-spectators. I almost wish that the story would continue, but then, the story does, doesn't it? In the games being played now, and yet to be played, everywhere.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #16 | #17 | #18 | #19 | #20 Total review score: 2.65 Individual issue reviews: #16 | #17 | #18 | #19 | #20 Total review score: 2.65

  11. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    actual rating: 3.5 Overall a really good conclusion to the series. I think the strong point of this series has always been how much it plays with structure both in how the series and volumes are structured with there being 20 issues and it ending in 2020 etc [I'm assuming the original plan was for this to actually be published at the end of 2020 before everything happened] and also in paying homage to big names in genre fiction that also have a huge impact on modern RPGs like Tolkien. I do feel l actual rating: 3.5 Overall a really good conclusion to the series. I think the strong point of this series has always been how much it plays with structure both in how the series and volumes are structured with there being 20 issues and it ending in 2020 etc [I'm assuming the original plan was for this to actually be published at the end of 2020 before everything happened] and also in paying homage to big names in genre fiction that also have a huge impact on modern RPGs like Tolkien. I do feel like this is sometimes a detriment as well because at times it can get a bit bogged down in the big picture and individual characters can get overlooked in the moment because of that, but overall a really strong series that does a lot of interesting things with story structure. Also so glad that we finally got to explore Ash's gender in this one, I'd been waiting for that since basically the beginning!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amarinske

    The writers nailed the ending, I really liked how this was done, but I've got one main issue that I can't overlook because it made the storytelling confusing. The narration squares switched POVs between panels, which is fin. It happened quite often and at times where it felt like what one character was narrating wasn't fully over, however. To me that got confusing. I wondered once too often if a certain character was still narrating because it just the voice just didn't fit that character anymore The writers nailed the ending, I really liked how this was done, but I've got one main issue that I can't overlook because it made the storytelling confusing. The narration squares switched POVs between panels, which is fin. It happened quite often and at times where it felt like what one character was narrating wasn't fully over, however. To me that got confusing. I wondered once too often if a certain character was still narrating because it just the voice just didn't fit that character anymore. This is more a problem with the illustration style than the writing though and it seems a bigger problem in this volume than in the others because the group is together the entire time.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    An absolutely ride through a complex world of meta-fantasy that celebrates stories and gaming while forming them into a fascinating adventure story and examination of personal identity. With the larger politics of the world mostly resolve, narrowing the focus back to the central party as they face themselves and try to find a way home.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Stuck the landing. Natural 20s all the way down. Outstanding.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Nadal

    I love the way Kieron Gillen blends classic literature with modern nerd culture. This volume was a good finale to a really creative series with well-drawn characters (pun semi-intended).

  16. 5 out of 5

    André Habet

    Read this and appreciated Gillen and Hans's love for the games and genre that shaped them and the book, but this felt absent of the stakes and momentum of the two previous arcs. There's no more wonder or remarkable acts of cleverness. Part of that feels by design, but an arc-long anti-climax stops feeling formally inventive when it's evident how this will go. Additionally, I admire how this book attempts to discuss identity, specifically queer identity, but the dialogue became much more stilted Read this and appreciated Gillen and Hans's love for the games and genre that shaped them and the book, but this felt absent of the stakes and momentum of the two previous arcs. There's no more wonder or remarkable acts of cleverness. Part of that feels by design, but an arc-long anti-climax stops feeling formally inventive when it's evident how this will go. Additionally, I admire how this book attempts to discuss identity, specifically queer identity, but the dialogue became much more stilted during these sections. 'Die' was pitched as a 20 issue series so Gillen and Hans have completed the story they wanted to tell. However, I wish that they had as much admiration for their own world as they do for their predecessors' because I would like to visit there again with a less Gen-X toxic group. Maybe this whole comic then has been a long sales pitch for us to pick up the 'Die' RPG, and make our own stories in that world of worlds.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    "We are now in the area of a map marked with 'Here Be Dragons'. In a land where there actually are dragons, that means 'Here be something significantly worse than dragons.'" In its final arc, the comic delving into the innards of roleplaying games at last gives us a dungeon crawl, and of course it's not the jolly 'bash orc, nick loot, repeat' sort, instead opening on an island that "protruded from the sea like a cancer sprouting through skin". But there's still room to check in with another of th "We are now in the area of a map marked with 'Here Be Dragons'. In a land where there actually are dragons, that means 'Here be something significantly worse than dragons.'" In its final arc, the comic delving into the innards of roleplaying games at last gives us a dungeon crawl, and of course it's not the jolly 'bash orc, nick loot, repeat' sort, instead opening on an island that "protruded from the sea like a cancer sprouting through skin". But there's still room to check in with another of the medium's looming presences along the way too. Meta takes on Lovecraft are painfully old hat, something Gillen's afterword to that issue made perfectly clear he knows too - and he still found a hell of a way to twist it such that it's not only not the same old same old, but horribly plausible into the bargain. "If this was a different kind of story, this is where we'd have the hugging emotional moment and I'd finally let it all out. I wish it was, but it isn't. It's a story where everyone's had enough of everyone's shit." It still looks gorgeous, of course, Stephanie Hans able to keep what could easily have become murky as fabulously moody instead, even as things get progressively grimmer and then cast the characters out on the shore of an even more desperate land. Not that I didn't love WicDiv, but fundamentally that was a series aimed at people who think Florence & the Machine matter. This was a book about geeky kids from the Midlands dreaming of escape, because of course they are - have you seen the Midlands? And right to the end, it has continued to get me where I live. "I feel like I'm full of all the destructive potential of a thrown die."

  18. 4 out of 5

    Russell Fox

    Gillen's 20-issue graphic novel didn't exactly end with a whimper for me, but neither did it end with a bang. I knew there was a degree of introspective, self-discovering/self-revealing, "we play the games that we make ourselves"-woohoo lurking about this story; fantasy story-tellers and gamers like Tolkien and the Bronte sisters and H.G. Wells and Lovecraft wouldn't have been a part of the fantasy world which Gillen's comic told the story of otherwise. But still, I wanted some kind of actual fa Gillen's 20-issue graphic novel didn't exactly end with a whimper for me, but neither did it end with a bang. I knew there was a degree of introspective, self-discovering/self-revealing, "we play the games that we make ourselves"-woohoo lurking about this story; fantasy story-tellers and gamers like Tolkien and the Bronte sisters and H.G. Wells and Lovecraft wouldn't have been a part of the fantasy world which Gillen's comic told the story of otherwise. But still, I wanted some kind of actual fantasy wrap-up to it all, rather than A Very Special Episode of Die. It seemed to me that much of the actual--and often actually exciting and intriguing--"gaming," as it were, that Gillen's characters had taken us readers through up to the point of the final couple of issues was simply tossed aside, all so our adventurers could get on to the big, final revelations, and all of which, in my opinion, had been summed up and done better by V'Ger in the Star Trek: The Motion Picture way back in 1979. Oh well, it was an entertaining ride up until the end.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Honora Quinn

    WOWIE. this is one of my favorite comics to date. everything about it and the twistiness of the dark fantasy paired with the real life events and tie ins that make it that much creepier. since reading vol. 3 I have gotten quite acquainted with DnD making me love this series all the more especially all the details and funny little nods to things you can enjoy as a novice but appreciate more with growing skill. I doubt this would ever happen since the story is all very contained but I would love to WOWIE. this is one of my favorite comics to date. everything about it and the twistiness of the dark fantasy paired with the real life events and tie ins that make it that much creepier. since reading vol. 3 I have gotten quite acquainted with DnD making me love this series all the more especially all the details and funny little nods to things you can enjoy as a novice but appreciate more with growing skill. I doubt this would ever happen since the story is all very contained but I would love to see more of the groups original adventures even though we know how it ends and how they first got reacquainted with the real world. it is a fascinating series with amazing art and writing that as much as I wouldn't personally want to go into the land of Die, I'd be willing to travel there again with perhaps a different motley crew unaware of what they have stumbled into. Here's to hoping for more wonderful work from the duo of Gillen and Hans both are modern comic legends in my book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amélie

    It's pretty much traditional by now for me to have a comic book as my first read of the year. Ironically, this time, I started with an ending. I will need to reread the entirety of Die to fully appreciate it, but even without that, it's quite a masterful series (and possibly even more so to me now that I'm more familiar with the world of roleplaying). I loved many things about Die. I loved what the last issues resolved, and also what they left open. I loved the complexity of this world as well as It's pretty much traditional by now for me to have a comic book as my first read of the year. Ironically, this time, I started with an ending. I will need to reread the entirety of Die to fully appreciate it, but even without that, it's quite a masterful series (and possibly even more so to me now that I'm more familiar with the world of roleplaying). I loved many things about Die. I loved what the last issues resolved, and also what they left open. I loved the complexity of this world as well as how that complexity was justified. I loved how the characters were written, in all their flaws and mistakes. Sometimes things got a bit confusing, including the (beautiful, beautiful) art, but I didn't mind. I will definitely keep recommending Die to anyone who could be interested in it, and look forward to Kieron Gillen's next project (or even just to catching up on Once & Future).

  21. 5 out of 5

    diane

    You know how M. Night Shyamalan became known for always putting (or trying to put) twists in his movies? I am getting the sense that Kieron Gillen has a similar yen, but with the ideas and concepts around STORY. This is basically the only actual comparison between the two that I would make, since Gillen seems to be a better storyteller than Shyamalan. The conclusion to this graphic novel series was interesting and good, but also somewhat similar to the ending of the Wicked and the Divine, in the You know how M. Night Shyamalan became known for always putting (or trying to put) twists in his movies? I am getting the sense that Kieron Gillen has a similar yen, but with the ideas and concepts around STORY. This is basically the only actual comparison between the two that I would make, since Gillen seems to be a better storyteller than Shyamalan. The conclusion to this graphic novel series was interesting and good, but also somewhat similar to the ending of the Wicked and the Divine, in the sense that STORY is also a character in the story Gillen is telling, and he's super in love with the exploration of how story actually affects us all. He's not wrong. And manages to also tell an interesting story while exploring this idea. This was a great series, really awesome art, quite enjoyed it all.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    NOTE: I will be writing a much longer review of this book next time I read it, which will be all 4 in a row, to increase retention and story comprehension. The final Volume of DIE is much more about the interpersonal relationship than the previous Volumes, at least to my recall. With the end in sight, the group goes together towards the center of Die, trying their hardest to make their way home. Only 5 return home, though this time Sol does make it back, though forever changed. It seems like the NOTE: I will be writing a much longer review of this book next time I read it, which will be all 4 in a row, to increase retention and story comprehension. The final Volume of DIE is much more about the interpersonal relationship than the previous Volumes, at least to my recall. With the end in sight, the group goes together towards the center of Die, trying their hardest to make their way home. Only 5 return home, though this time Sol does make it back, though forever changed. It seems like the end of the story, but there could always be a sequel or "Return to DIE" story in the future. Kieron Gillen is a master storyteller and I would definitely come back to the world. Easily one of the best short series in recent comics. Really looking forward to seeing how the game will turn out. Recommend.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Molly Lazer

    I was prepared to hate on this book based on my feelings about the first three volumes, but Gillen and Hans ABSOLUTELY stick the landing here. This last volume made the first three worth it. While there was still some of rapid-fire storytelling that populated the first three books, the last 4 issues of this one really focused in on one continuous story with only the main characters (save for H.P. Lovecraft's appearance and subsequent offing) and was able to help the reader really understand who I was prepared to hate on this book based on my feelings about the first three volumes, but Gillen and Hans ABSOLUTELY stick the landing here. This last volume made the first three worth it. While there was still some of rapid-fire storytelling that populated the first three books, the last 4 issues of this one really focused in on one continuous story with only the main characters (save for H.P. Lovecraft's appearance and subsequent offing) and was able to help the reader really understand who these characters is and what Die is for (the ultimate question here--what is the point of everything we have read?). I found the answers to be extremely satisfying. And, of course, Hans's art is, as always, stunning.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Robby

    In this last arc, Gillen returns to some of the character essentials that made DIE interesting to begin with, all while bringing us one last bizarre author cameo. Though the conclusion is a bit fluff, the penultimate issue is truly innovative in its use of fantasy tropes to explore themes of gender and identity. As a whole, DIE is definitely a run where I would say individual issues and episodes were stronger than the sometimes-nebulous overall story (which seems to be an ongoing phenomenon in r In this last arc, Gillen returns to some of the character essentials that made DIE interesting to begin with, all while bringing us one last bizarre author cameo. Though the conclusion is a bit fluff, the penultimate issue is truly innovative in its use of fantasy tropes to explore themes of gender and identity. As a whole, DIE is definitely a run where I would say individual issues and episodes were stronger than the sometimes-nebulous overall story (which seems to be an ongoing phenomenon in recent writer-driven comics). However, I suspect this is partly do to DIE being a comic that needs to be re-read to be fully appreciated. And, if you are a fan of Gillen's creator interviews in the back matter, then you get a special treat in a chat with D&D legend Matt Mercer!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rix

    Oh DIE...how you frustrate me. I think maybe if I were more personally invested in tabletop RPGs this series would have hit harder, but as things stand this story seems to have a frightfully overinflated sense of its own importance. It also suffers greatly from not giving itself enough time to get to all the themes it throws at the wall, hoping something will stick. I appreciate that it was hampered by a reduced run but when the team knew they only had a minimal amount of time to end things they Oh DIE...how you frustrate me. I think maybe if I were more personally invested in tabletop RPGs this series would have hit harder, but as things stand this story seems to have a frightfully overinflated sense of its own importance. It also suffers greatly from not giving itself enough time to get to all the themes it throws at the wall, hoping something will stick. I appreciate that it was hampered by a reduced run but when the team knew they only had a minimal amount of time to end things they could very easily have streamlined. The world this story takes place in is interesting, and I think the characters could have been, but there was just too much going on to ever really get to know them.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pádraic

    For all this series' metaness, it was somehow not until literally issue 18 that I realised, oh, of course this is going to end at issue 20. The last number of the die. For me what's changed since I read volume 3 is very simple: I started playing D&D. I'm sure when I go back for a reread the whole thing will work for me on levels it didn't before, but for now, I'll just say that although I wasn't as 100% sold on the ending as I was on all the steps to it, it's nevertheless overall very, very good For all this series' metaness, it was somehow not until literally issue 18 that I realised, oh, of course this is going to end at issue 20. The last number of the die. For me what's changed since I read volume 3 is very simple: I started playing D&D. I'm sure when I go back for a reread the whole thing will work for me on levels it didn't before, but for now, I'll just say that although I wasn't as 100% sold on the ending as I was on all the steps to it, it's nevertheless overall very, very good. Great writing and great art? Like a four-leafed clover in the comics world, truly.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Pankau

    The group is back together for a final dungeon crawl. They must travel to the center of the world in order to try to stop Die from merging with their own world. Along the way, they must face their inner demons, as well as their fractious histories with one another. In the end, they will find what the game was for. Excellent end to this excellent series. Lots of great character moments, and also an interesting explanation of the circuitous world-building. Really glad it had a strong ending.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Westen

    A really great finish to the series, with still leaving the door cracked open a tiny bit for a return trip. Not all series can keep the same level of quality through the whole series, but this one does. Although the whole 'our actions in the present created our past, but only because our past happened are we here now, instigating that very past' kind of thing makes my head hurt. Although one thing is certain, Die will never die. Also, be careful who you allow to make TRPGS, because you might acc A really great finish to the series, with still leaving the door cracked open a tiny bit for a return trip. Not all series can keep the same level of quality through the whole series, but this one does. Although the whole 'our actions in the present created our past, but only because our past happened are we here now, instigating that very past' kind of thing makes my head hurt. Although one thing is certain, Die will never die. Also, be careful who you allow to make TRPGS, because you might accidentally create a dark parallel universe.

  29. 5 out of 5

    John

    I'm glad this is the last volume. The ending is not bad, and about as upbeat as it could be given the nature of the story that led to it, but it's still depressing. I still think this story is an anti-ad for roleplaying. It makes a nod towards RPGs being a method of self-exploration, but in the context of such exploration causing untold suffering for both the explorer and others. I can't really recommend this story to others, but I don't regret having read it. I'm glad this is the last volume. The ending is not bad, and about as upbeat as it could be given the nature of the story that led to it, but it's still depressing. I still think this story is an anti-ad for roleplaying. It makes a nod towards RPGs being a method of self-exploration, but in the context of such exploration causing untold suffering for both the explorer and others. I can't really recommend this story to others, but I don't regret having read it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bree Dick

    I bought this series specifically because it was a Jumanji-esque real-life Dungeons and Dragons comic series. And it did not disappoint. It's fast-paced and unpredictable. The characters were relatable because they were all going through their own issues and dealing with it in different ways through their game characters and their interactions with the people they met in the game. It instantly became one of my favorite series. I bought this series specifically because it was a Jumanji-esque real-life Dungeons and Dragons comic series. And it did not disappoint. It's fast-paced and unpredictable. The characters were relatable because they were all going through their own issues and dealing with it in different ways through their game characters and their interactions with the people they met in the game. It instantly became one of my favorite series.

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