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All the Queen's Men

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Amateur detective Queen Elizabeth II is back in this hugely entertaining follow-up to The Windsor Knot, in which Her Majesty must determine how a missing painting is connected to the shocking death of a staff member inside Buckingham Palace. It's the height of summer 2016, and the Queen has pressing duties to attend to, such as meeting with the new prime minister, keeping a Amateur detective Queen Elizabeth II is back in this hugely entertaining follow-up to The Windsor Knot, in which Her Majesty must determine how a missing painting is connected to the shocking death of a staff member inside Buckingham Palace. It's the height of summer 2016, and the Queen has pressing duties to attend to, such as meeting with the new prime minister, keeping an eye on a tumultuous election in the States, and the smaller but perhaps more frustrating matter of recovering a beloved painting that has unexpectedly turned up in the wrong place. She relies on her Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, to make sure she's fully apprised of the goings on in the palace and to help solve any issues that arise. Rozie holds Her Majesty in the highest esteem and does everything in her power not to disappoint "the Boss." But she has recently become aware of a spate of disturbing letters some staff have received, and though her first instinct is to inform the Queen, more senior members of the household assure her they have everything in hand. When one of the targets of the letters is found dead in the pool house at Buckingham Palace, however, Rozie decides it's time to alert the Queen. After all, though the rest of the staff and public may not realize it, Elizabeth is the keenest sleuth among them. Sometimes, it takes a Queen's eye to see connections where no one else can.


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Amateur detective Queen Elizabeth II is back in this hugely entertaining follow-up to The Windsor Knot, in which Her Majesty must determine how a missing painting is connected to the shocking death of a staff member inside Buckingham Palace. It's the height of summer 2016, and the Queen has pressing duties to attend to, such as meeting with the new prime minister, keeping a Amateur detective Queen Elizabeth II is back in this hugely entertaining follow-up to The Windsor Knot, in which Her Majesty must determine how a missing painting is connected to the shocking death of a staff member inside Buckingham Palace. It's the height of summer 2016, and the Queen has pressing duties to attend to, such as meeting with the new prime minister, keeping an eye on a tumultuous election in the States, and the smaller but perhaps more frustrating matter of recovering a beloved painting that has unexpectedly turned up in the wrong place. She relies on her Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, to make sure she's fully apprised of the goings on in the palace and to help solve any issues that arise. Rozie holds Her Majesty in the highest esteem and does everything in her power not to disappoint "the Boss." But she has recently become aware of a spate of disturbing letters some staff have received, and though her first instinct is to inform the Queen, more senior members of the household assure her they have everything in hand. When one of the targets of the letters is found dead in the pool house at Buckingham Palace, however, Rozie decides it's time to alert the Queen. After all, though the rest of the staff and public may not realize it, Elizabeth is the keenest sleuth among them. Sometimes, it takes a Queen's eye to see connections where no one else can.

30 review for All the Queen's Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Hall

    A Three Dog Problem is the second novel to feature Queen Elizabeth II in an covert investigative capacity and picks up in the wake of the divisive Brexit referendum with a new Prime Minister in Theresa May and a contentious US election on the horizon. In common with the first book it is the Queen’s Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, who goes out and asks questions and discreetly reports back. Whilst I didn’t think the first book was hugely compelling I found it gently entertaining and fe A Three Dog Problem is the second novel to feature Queen Elizabeth II in an covert investigative capacity and picks up in the wake of the divisive Brexit referendum with a new Prime Minister in Theresa May and a contentious US election on the horizon. In common with the first book it is the Queen’s Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, who goes out and asks questions and discreetly reports back. Whilst I didn’t think the first book was hugely compelling I found it gently entertaining and felt Bennett did an excellent job with her characterisation of the Queen. However with the novelty factor of the first book absent and far fewer moments of wit and humour this second book struggled to hold my attention. This wasn’t helped by the fact that there are several threads to the mystery (a missing painting, a suspected murder, poison pen letters targeted at multiple people and the long-standing problem of Palace items being spirited away on the sly), making it difficult to do justice to any one of them. The Queen is disconcerted to spot one of her favourite paintings - and one that belongs to her - at an exhibition of maritime art in Portsmouth. The painting, which Phillip describes as “ghastly”, is of the retired Britannia yacht and once hung outside her bedroom. Positive it is the original she enlists Rozie to discover when it left her collection and why it has never been returned. This turns out to be anything but the simple task that it sounds but when the dead body of an unpopular elderly housekeeper is found beside the Palace swimming pool it slips down the priority list. With the jury out on whether the death of the housekeeper was an unfortunate accident or cold-blooded murder, rumours amongst the royal household staff go into overdrive. When the Queen asks Rozie about the victim and discovers that she was the target of a sustained campaign of poison pen letters it brings several concerning revelations to light, with the Queen discovering that there is a lot more going on below stairs than she could ever have imagined. Needless to say it gets extremely convoluted and I was no more invested in this string of crimes than those in the first book. Whilst I enjoyed meeting Rozie Oshodi again and this second book is well-paced and easily readable, I found it all a bit mundane from start to finish. There are far fewer highlights (topical jokes, humorous exchanges between the Queen and Prince Phillip) and as with most cosy crime, the mystery is really only an opportunity to showcase the cast and given one of the two main protagonists is royalty and the setting it Buckingham Palace, it limits the extent of plausible embellishment. Once again there is a large secondary cast of very dispensable and forgettable characters who make fleeting appearances and don’t make much of an impression. Readers who enjoyed the first book will no doubt enjoy this second book too, but sadly my journey with the Queen and Rozie stops here.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    A Three Dog Problem proved to be the perfect contrast to the run of rather serious books I’ve read lately. It’s a delightful, charming mystery in which Her Majesty proves herself to be just as astute and no-nonsense as we always imagined. As one of her staff observes, ‘She was a hell of a lot sharper than she looked. Mistakes were picked up on. Dry comments were made. Eyes were rolled.’ Ex-soldier Rozie, the Queen’s Assistant Private Secretary, is a great character and a force to be reckoned with A Three Dog Problem proved to be the perfect contrast to the run of rather serious books I’ve read lately. It’s a delightful, charming mystery in which Her Majesty proves herself to be just as astute and no-nonsense as we always imagined. As one of her staff observes, ‘She was a hell of a lot sharper than she looked. Mistakes were picked up on. Dry comments were made. Eyes were rolled.’ Ex-soldier Rozie, the Queen’s Assistant Private Secretary, is a great character and a force to be reckoned with. As she reminds herself, when the enquiries she has set in train take an unexpectedly risky turn, ‘her regimental specialism had been “find, strike, destroy, suppress”‘. I loved the humorous elements in the book such as Prince Philip’s petname for his wife being Cabbage, the idea of the Queen googling herself on her iPad to find out where she was on a particular date, and that she spent some of her time at Balmoral binge-watching Murder She Wrote. I also enjoyed the ‘behind the scenes’ look at life in a royal palace, an increasingly dilapidated one as it turns out in the case of Buckingham Palace. And, as Rozie observes, at night its character changes. ‘The majority of staff went home, the flood of tradesmen, craftsmen and daily visitors slowed to a trickle, and the place was reclaimed by those who lived there or habitually worked late. The buildings stopped trying to impress and their occupants got on with the task of working as efficiently as they could in a rabbit warren of corridors that ceased to make sense two hundred years ago.’ External events such as the fallout from the Brexit referendum and the US Presidential election provide a subtle backdrop to the main storyline. The Queen muses about women who have achieved things or may do so in the future, such as Hilary Clinton, whilst underplaying her own role in world affairs. And there is a moving scene in which the Queen attends the annual Remembrance Day ceremony at the Cenotaph; it’s especially poignant as ill-health meant she was unable to attend the ceremony for only the seventh time in her long reign this year. And, of course, at the heart of the book is an ingenious mystery involving amongst other things an unexplained death, poison pen letters, Renaissance art, and some murky goings-on in the bowels of Buckingham Palace.  Definitely a three dog problem. I know many readers have fallen in love with this series, which commenced with The Windsor Knot in 2020, and I can now understand why. The good news is the author promises there’s another book on the way next year.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I loved every page. I loved being back at the palace solving mysteries with the Queen and Rozie. It was nice to see the character progression from book one and I’m left wanting even more. A brilliant series that I really love.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    ⭐️ 3.5 ⭐️ I’m quite partial to a comfortable, cosy crime, so I couldn’t wait to get my canines (sorry!) stuck into A Three Dog Problem. It took me a few chapters to get to grips with the fact that the main character was the present queen, but when I did I was hooked (I could even hear her voice in my head narrating the story!). S.J. Bennett has done a fabulous job of characterising Queen Elizabeth II; Her Majesty is portrayed just as I imagine her to be in real life. With quite a large cast of char ⭐️ 3.5 ⭐️ I’m quite partial to a comfortable, cosy crime, so I couldn’t wait to get my canines (sorry!) stuck into A Three Dog Problem. It took me a few chapters to get to grips with the fact that the main character was the present queen, but when I did I was hooked (I could even hear her voice in my head narrating the story!). S.J. Bennett has done a fabulous job of characterising Queen Elizabeth II; Her Majesty is portrayed just as I imagine her to be in real life. With quite a large cast of characters I did have to take notes and recap on who was who, this slightly spoilt the flow of the story for me. A Three Dog Problem is a good, old fashioned whodunnit, with twists, turns and the odd fishy red herring thrown in for good measure. I was left guessing right until the end. If you’re a fan of cosy crime, this is the book for you. Many thanks to Tandem Collective, S.J Bennett and Zaffre Books for my gifted copy, in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    RTC. I'm in two minds over whether to give this 3 stars or round up to 4. I preferred The Windsor Knot more, if I am being completely honest, as there were elements to this story that I didn't warm to at all. Probably doesn't help that I'm audiobooking The Man Who Died Twice at the same time as reading this, as these both tackled the cozy crime sub-genre in different ways. I think I will continue with this series, but we shall see.... ***eProof gifted by UK publisher, Zaffre/Bonnier Books UK, via RTC. I'm in two minds over whether to give this 3 stars or round up to 4. I preferred The Windsor Knot more, if I am being completely honest, as there were elements to this story that I didn't warm to at all. Probably doesn't help that I'm audiobooking The Man Who Died Twice at the same time as reading this, as these both tackled the cozy crime sub-genre in different ways. I think I will continue with this series, but we shall see.... ***eProof gifted by UK publisher, Zaffre/Bonnier Books UK, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review/reaction*** In the wake of the Brexit referendum that has divided a country and the US election between Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump, the Queen just wants some peace and quiet. But, it looks like she's not going to get it as, when on a Royal visit to a Navy exhibitition, she sees a painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia on display. Her painting. And she gave no permission for its display. In fact, she thought it was misplaced in the mid-1980s. As she begins to look into this, a body of a disliked housekeeper is found at the Palace's swimming pool, her ankle deeply cut, causing her to bleed to death. An accident, surely? But it's strange that her death happens as the Queen begins to look into the painting's disappearance and several of the female staff, including her trusted secretary, Rosie, receive nasty poison pen letters... Something is going on in Buckingham Palace, and Her Majesty is determined to get to the bottom of it. Am going to honest with you, dear reader: I am not entirely sure where I sit on this. I like this, but up to a point. There's several things that make me stop from enjoying this as much as I did with Windsor Knot, and the worst part is that I can't exactly put my finger on what the problem is. It's annoying as I can't figure it out and I think I am going to continue with this series. I have plans to read book 3 when it comes out next year, so why do I feel the way I do with Three Dog Problem? The only thing I can think of is that this wasn't as fun as the first. The fun didn't exactly hit home for me. I like some of the issues and the characters that this book had (I love Rozie and I did like the Queen, but I like them the most when they were together and that wasn't enough for me in this book), but the fun and wonder of Windsor Knot wasn't here. I wonder if it's because it was trying to do too many things - poison pen letters, murder, stolen paintings. Maybe if one of these elements was removed and the story focused on characters a tad more, maybe it would have worked for me...? Maybe it's because I was, at the same time of reading this, audiobooking another cosy murder mystery - The Man Who Died Twice by Richard Osman. Now, both of these are cosy mysteries and both tackle this subgenre in very different ways. Like I said, I am going to read book 3 when that comes out. I am very intrigued to see where this series is going to. But this mystery didn't exactly work for me so I might not rush out to get my hands on the Queen's next mystery as fast as I would have...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Another excellent offering by Ms Bennett. This one makes a foray into the world of art forgery, whilst again it’s chock full of scenes which give us glimpses of the Queen’s daily life. Again we see her as incisive and capable, and there’s another delightful scene in which members of her household - who frustrate her by forever having everything ‘under control,’ even when it patently isn’t - explain the outcome of the investigation to her, making sure they go slow enough for her to absorb the rev Another excellent offering by Ms Bennett. This one makes a foray into the world of art forgery, whilst again it’s chock full of scenes which give us glimpses of the Queen’s daily life. Again we see her as incisive and capable, and there’s another delightful scene in which members of her household - who frustrate her by forever having everything ‘under control,’ even when it patently isn’t - explain the outcome of the investigation to her, making sure they go slow enough for her to absorb the revelations which, unbeknown to them, have all resulted from subtle hints she had supplied to them in the first place! Once again, her compassion is front and centre. She’s the only one able to see beyond the faults which make the housekeeper - the murder victim - universally disliked, although perhaps this is because she’s the only one who has the whole picture. One thing bugged me. I did wonder why (view spoiler)[the man responsible gave Rozie a clue which ultimately helped the Queen piece everything together. I can’t see why Sholto needed to mention the breakages business (hide spoiler)] . The ending, which finally explains why the ‘ghastly’ little painting which started the whole business was important to Her Majesty, is absolutely lovely. It brought a tear to my eye. I’ll definitely look forward to reading the next one in the series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Conaghan

    This is the sequel to ‘The Windsor Knot’ which was released last year. It was such a pleasure to be on the Tandem Readalong for this one with a gifted copy of the book. I was thrown off so many times throughout this ‘who done it’ and thought the twists were so clever and well thought out. If this one is on your radar, feel free to DM me for some amazing downloadable prompt cards to get you thinking! I joined an Instagram live with author SJ Bennett who has confirmed there are going to be at leas This is the sequel to ‘The Windsor Knot’ which was released last year. It was such a pleasure to be on the Tandem Readalong for this one with a gifted copy of the book. I was thrown off so many times throughout this ‘who done it’ and thought the twists were so clever and well thought out. If this one is on your radar, feel free to DM me for some amazing downloadable prompt cards to get you thinking! I joined an Instagram live with author SJ Bennett who has confirmed there are going to be at least another THREE to this series! Can’t wait for them!!! 🤩

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chloe (libraryofchlo)

    The body of a disliked housekeeper is found at the Palace's swimming pool shortly after the Queen sees her painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia on display at a Navy exhibition, without her consent. While this is happening, members of her staff including her trusted secretary, Rozie, are receiving messages from an anonymous source, and the content is less than kind. Tasked with a menagerie of issues, the Queen is determined to get to the bottom of what is afoot. A Three Dog Problem is essentiall The body of a disliked housekeeper is found at the Palace's swimming pool shortly after the Queen sees her painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia on display at a Navy exhibition, without her consent. While this is happening, members of her staff including her trusted secretary, Rozie, are receiving messages from an anonymous source, and the content is less than kind. Tasked with a menagerie of issues, the Queen is determined to get to the bottom of what is afoot. A Three Dog Problem is essentially a whodunnit set on palace grounds, with the British royal family making cameos and a host of red herrings to keep you guessing. Queen Elizabeth II acts in an investigative capacity, but is the most discreet of sleuths of course. The characterisation of the Queen is charming and insightful, and there are humorous moments akin to the kind you'd read about in Richard Osman's The Thursday Murder Club series. While I hadn't read the first book in this series, I was still able to grasp that this wasn't Her Majesty's first rodeo, and that she'd put her grey matter to use to investigate matters before. This cosy crime novel does feature fun quips showing the Queen's relationship with Philip, and some gorgeous scenic description of the palace setting. I did however find the plot a bit muddled in places - the problems that the Queen is trying to find an answer to are plentiful - there's a missing painting, a suspected murder, and anonymous letters that target multiple people at the place - which means at times there are too many threads to keep track of. These problems are also combined with a wider theme of a covert gang taking items from the Palace under the radar, so at times it can feel like there is too much going on. I think the plot would've benefitted from less going on, and also maybe an index of the characters especially as some are known by nicknames or multiple terms - I often found myself going, wait a sec, which one is he? Since I write about the royals for my job as a journalist, this was an enjoyable more light-hearted way to get a royal fix, and despite my issues with the plot it was still an amusing and far-fetched piece of escapism to get into on my days off. *My copy was gifted by publisher, Zaffre/Bonnier Books UK for a Tandem Readalong on Instagram

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Timpson

    In the wake of the referendum which has divided the nation, the last thing the Queen needs is any more problems to deal with. But when a painting given to the Queen years ago turns up at the Royal Navy Exhibition, she knows there is something going on and is determined to get to the bottom of it. As her able assistant Rozie starts to ask questions it seems that more than a small painting is at stake and it’s not long before the first body is found. Now its up her to Her Majesty to uncover the trut In the wake of the referendum which has divided the nation, the last thing the Queen needs is any more problems to deal with. But when a painting given to the Queen years ago turns up at the Royal Navy Exhibition, she knows there is something going on and is determined to get to the bottom of it. As her able assistant Rozie starts to ask questions it seems that more than a small painting is at stake and it’s not long before the first body is found. Now its up her to Her Majesty to uncover the truth, all the while juggling her duties, her family and the reputation of her great nation. This is the second book in the Queen investigates as I think these books are a true delight. First of all the plot is nicely twisted and complicated without being too far-fetched and ridiculous. The attention to detail without forcing you to read horrific scenes of death or racist slanders make it such a cosy mystery that I think this book would actually appeal to all ages. It puts me in mind of Agatha Christie, its gentle without ever becoming dull. However my favourite part of these books are the characters. As much as I love Rozie and her stalwart devotion to the Queen, it is the monarch herself who is the shiny star. She comes across as so smart and capable but with understanding of her own limitations as well as those around her. I liked the little nods to an impish personality and her affectionate relationship with her husband (This takes place before his passing). She has endless compassion and insight where others saw only the surface of a person. I think, as someone who has only a passing knowledge of the intricacies of the royal household it might have been nice to have a family tree or guide to who’s who is the front of the book. I would have liked to have a list of servants or maybe even a map of the palace and locations. In addition the title harkens to Sherlock Holmes “A three Pipe problem,” so I think “A three pup problem” would have been a better title, but that's just because I love alliteration. Other than that I found this such a great read, it was hard to put down and genuinely left me smiling at the end. Well worth a read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nicki

    I loved this book, even more than book one The Windsor Knot! It was one of those ‘just one more chapter’ books, where I just had to keep reading as I was enjoying myself so much. It’s set in 2016, just after the Brexit Referendum, so there were references to Brexit, and Theresa May being the new Prime Minster, which seems such a long time ago now. Most of the action took place at Buckingham Palace this time rather than Windsor in the last book. Rozie was sent on various endeavours for the Queen, j I loved this book, even more than book one The Windsor Knot! It was one of those ‘just one more chapter’ books, where I just had to keep reading as I was enjoying myself so much. It’s set in 2016, just after the Brexit Referendum, so there were references to Brexit, and Theresa May being the new Prime Minster, which seems such a long time ago now. Most of the action took place at Buckingham Palace this time rather than Windsor in the last book. Rozie was sent on various endeavours for the Queen, just like in the last book and there were some fab scenes with the different encounters she has in the course of her ‘investigation’ for her Majesty. The actual mystery wasn’t as complicated as the first book, but it did involve a few different people and different departments at the Palace. It wasn’t just about a missing painting, but got quite a bit darker as Rozie uncovered much more than she expected. I highly recommend this book especially if you enjoy cosy mysteries or books connected to the Royal Family. Thanks to Bonnier Zaffre and NetGalley for my digital copy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joanne D'Arcy

    This is the second in what I hope to be a series of books about HM The Queen helping to solve mysteries all the while going about state business and unassuming having no idea what is really going not just in the world outside of those palace walls, but certainly inside of them too. Back is APS (Assistant Private Secretary) Rozie who fulfilled something The Queen had been looking for and became her partner in crime solving. When out on a visit The Queen spots a painting that used to be hanging out This is the second in what I hope to be a series of books about HM The Queen helping to solve mysteries all the while going about state business and unassuming having no idea what is really going not just in the world outside of those palace walls, but certainly inside of them too. Back is APS (Assistant Private Secretary) Rozie who fulfilled something The Queen had been looking for and became her partner in crime solving. When out on a visit The Queen spots a painting that used to be hanging outside her bedroom door, she asks Rozie to make some discreet enquiries about its odd misplacement from the palace walls to the walls of the Royal Navy. When a body is found in the palace swimming pool, suicide is suspected and seems to be the neatest conclusion, but all is not what it seems about the deceased. Opening up a can of poison pen letters, missing items, rare paintings and secret tunnels it seems Rozie and her boss have a lot to consider. Can a conclusion be reached before there is more murders and perhaps The Queen has to start considering a new APS? For me you do really need to have read the first one to get a sense of whose everyone is and how Rozie comes to be in the position she is in as well. It is terribly (in a good way!) British and may not translate across other countries, but there are plenty of references to recent events from Brexit, Trump election and the like that it is very much a book of it’s time. All the Royal stuff is a fascinating bonus! This is the perfect cosy crime book and the fact it features The Queen as one of the main characters just brings me sheer joy. Why shouldn’t she have her own fun, with only a small select few knowing about it!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    The second installment in the Her Majesty the Queen Investigates, A Three Dog Problem is a unique take on the mystery and crime genre. The title is a play on the three pipe problem that Sherlock Holmes often encountered in Conan Doyle's stories. Having never read the first, I was intrigued to find out more on this royal crime caper. The cover mis-lead me slightly: the drawing looks like Queen Victoria and I was expecting a mysterious romp through the streets of Victorian London. The book has sever The second installment in the Her Majesty the Queen Investigates, A Three Dog Problem is a unique take on the mystery and crime genre. The title is a play on the three pipe problem that Sherlock Holmes often encountered in Conan Doyle's stories. Having never read the first, I was intrigued to find out more on this royal crime caper. The cover mis-lead me slightly: the drawing looks like Queen Victoria and I was expecting a mysterious romp through the streets of Victorian London. The book has several narrative threads running through it which, at first, is a little off-putting and confusing. There are missing paintings, murdered bodies and every-day occurances like stolen Palace items which make it a little difficult to really follow the true crime of the murder. After a while, however, the flow of the book does settle in to a steady rhythm and the Queen seems to rise above it all, as one would expect. I am no Royalist but the Queen is a sterling example, and I have read only one other book that features her as the protagonist (Alan Bennett's 'The Uncommon Reader') and I didn't feel the same kind of warmth and joy toward the Queen as I did there. The mystery plods along and I didn't find it all too consuming, but I found it to be gentle but intriguing. From reading other reviews it seems the first book had a better depth of wit and humour about it, which I found to be lacking in this one. It seems a fun little caper that is cosy, warm and not at all like the usual grim and dark realistic crime thrillers I tend to read. I wouldn't say the Queen is particularly fleshed out here, but it's a decent and quick read full of joy albeit coupled with murder.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rohase Piercy

    So pleased to discover this series! I thought at first, what with the pic of Queen Victoria on the cover and the Sherlock Holmes reference in the title, that this was going to be set in the 1890s ... but no, the Queen in question is our very own Liz the Second, who apparently likes to solve the odd murder in her spare time - who knew? Set in 2016, after the Brexit vote and during the US elections that brought Trump to power, there's a lot going on both inside and outside Buckingham Palace ... and So pleased to discover this series! I thought at first, what with the pic of Queen Victoria on the cover and the Sherlock Holmes reference in the title, that this was going to be set in the 1890s ... but no, the Queen in question is our very own Liz the Second, who apparently likes to solve the odd murder in her spare time - who knew? Set in 2016, after the Brexit vote and during the US elections that brought Trump to power, there's a lot going on both inside and outside Buckingham Palace ... and when Her Majesty gets it into her mind that the death of a housekeeper on Palace premises and the misappropriation of a certain painting of sentimental value might be linked in some way, she enlists the help of her loyal Assistant Private Secretary, Capt Rozie Oshodi to do a little digging around behind the scenes ... This was such a fun read, and I'll definitely be catching up with the rest of the series now! S J Bennett obviously knows her Royal protocol, and I wouldn't be surprised if Her Majesty herself wasn't a fan ... strictly on the QT, of course 😘

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    How utterly refreshing. I truly enjoyed 'A Three Dog Problem', which was thoroughly entertaining and possessed many endearing qualities, despite the challenging circumstances. I found is difficult to divert my attention away from it for long, as I just knew there'd be something else to discover. Not only the 'leads' her Majesty covertly instructs others to follow, but by subtly sharing the personalities of the household and staff through their long hours and individual commitment. The investigatio How utterly refreshing. I truly enjoyed 'A Three Dog Problem', which was thoroughly entertaining and possessed many endearing qualities, despite the challenging circumstances. I found is difficult to divert my attention away from it for long, as I just knew there'd be something else to discover. Not only the 'leads' her Majesty covertly instructs others to follow, but by subtly sharing the personalities of the household and staff through their long hours and individual commitment. The investigation is solid and has many threads to pick at before the mystery is unravelled, but it's the Queen's brief exchanges with Philip that were one of my favourite things. So-much-so I looked forward to his appearances as they bought a smile to my face, especially when he calls his wife 'Cabbage'. A truly great read. Looking forward to the next one! (I thank the publisher for providing a complimentary copy of this title, which I voluntarily chose to read and review.)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    A Three Dog Problem is the second book in the series of ‘Her Majesty the Queen Investigates’ by S.J.Bennett. I have already read the first book, The Windsor Knot and really enjoyed it so I was definitely looking forward to reading this too. It did not disappoint and was as enjoyable as the first book. The story was really good and the characters are well written. I love the premise of these books; they are easy to read (even though I’m not that clued up on various artists) and perfect to curl up A Three Dog Problem is the second book in the series of ‘Her Majesty the Queen Investigates’ by S.J.Bennett. I have already read the first book, The Windsor Knot and really enjoyed it so I was definitely looking forward to reading this too. It did not disappoint and was as enjoyable as the first book. The story was really good and the characters are well written. I love the premise of these books; they are easy to read (even though I’m not that clued up on various artists) and perfect to curl up on the couch with. I also liked the descriptions of London and around the palace - I love visiting London and so I could just imagine the secret tunnels and the excitement of working in the palace! The book itself is also lovely and would make a nice Christmas present for any avid reader or royal fan. I would definitely recommend this book and the series to others. Thanks to Readers First for the ARC.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eirlys

    Entertaining Tale Entertaining story, once again featuring Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth. A missing painting, of which Her Majesty was very fond, sets up an unexpected situation. The Queen enlisted Rozie to investigate how her painting had turned up in the Royal Navy base. Lots of action, but lots of chuckles too. I liked the way that Queen Elizabeth was depicted as an alert, interesting woman, and not just a figuehead.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    This is a nice, unassuming murder mystery that I really enjoyed. The best part was the depiction of Queen Elizabeth as a warm and intelligent woman interested and involved in all around her. I loved the little snippets of the private lives behind the scenes of the royal family and its surroundings. The side characters were well done and it made a pleasant read. I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway for this honest review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Xerlan

    Wow! S.J. Bennett delivers again. I didn't think this second book would be better than The Windsor Knot, but it is. Such fun! Absolutely hilarious and entertaining! The queen is savvy, witty, resourceful and brilliant. It is a series now, S.J. will have to keep writing the rest of the stories we didn't realize we are waiting for. Wow! S.J. Bennett delivers again. I didn't think this second book would be better than The Windsor Knot, but it is. Such fun! Absolutely hilarious and entertaining! The queen is savvy, witty, resourceful and brilliant. It is a series now, S.J. will have to keep writing the rest of the stories we didn't realize we are waiting for.

  19. 4 out of 5

    BTB

    Really disappointing. I absolutely loved the Windsor Knot, but this just didn’t have the same feel. Found it very slow and it didn’t have the same wit and humour as the first.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    So, this is book 2 in the series Her Majesty The Queen Investigates. I enjoyed book 1 but this stepped it up a notch. Great characters and a good plot. Thoroughly great cosy crime! Looking forward to book 3 later this year. Highly recommended.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bobbye

    If you like a good mystery with a royal connection, All the Queen’s Men by S. J. Bennett is just the book for you. You get a behind the scene look at Buckingham Palace as the characters investigate a death of one of the housekeepers. While digging into the circumstances of this death, they uncover connections to a death that happened years before. The storyline was complicated enough to keep your interest and the setting added to my interest. I appreciate getting to read this advanced copy and w If you like a good mystery with a royal connection, All the Queen’s Men by S. J. Bennett is just the book for you. You get a behind the scene look at Buckingham Palace as the characters investigate a death of one of the housekeepers. While digging into the circumstances of this death, they uncover connections to a death that happened years before. The storyline was complicated enough to keep your interest and the setting added to my interest. I appreciate getting to read this advanced copy and will be reading the author’s previous book, Windsor’s Knot. I hope Bennett is already writing another book in this series!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    This was an advanced reader's copy I won in a Goodreads giveaway. Another mystery for the queen and Rozie to solve. If you enjoyed the Windsor Knot you will definitely enjoy this one! This was an advanced reader's copy I won in a Goodreads giveaway. Another mystery for the queen and Rozie to solve. If you enjoyed the Windsor Knot you will definitely enjoy this one!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kara Duchart

    I loved ‘the Windsor knot’, the first book in this series so I couldn’t wait to read this one, and it did not disappoint. Although the book didn’t make me laugh out loud, it is very humorous and amusing which makes it a joy to read. The quality of writing probably isn’t the best ever, however for me that didn’t detract from the overall enjoyment of the book. As with the first book, The characters are very likeable and you can’t help laughing with them. The references in the book are very curren I loved ‘the Windsor knot’, the first book in this series so I couldn’t wait to read this one, and it did not disappoint. Although the book didn’t make me laugh out loud, it is very humorous and amusing which makes it a joy to read. The quality of writing probably isn’t the best ever, however for me that didn’t detract from the overall enjoyment of the book. As with the first book, The characters are very likeable and you can’t help laughing with them. The references in the book are very current and up to date so it makes the book almost relatable even though the whole premise of the book is quite ridiculous. This book was thoroughly enjoyable to read and I really hope it is not the last in the series as I would love to hear more! I definitely recommend this book to anyone wanting a light hearted, easy, amusing read. This was easily a five star read!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    I love this series, the idea of the Queen as a part time detective doesn’t get old. What is more the fact that she quietly solves the mystery while allowing others to believe they did is just perfect. I adore the relationship between the queen and Prince Philip and the love and fun that is seen between them. The way real time events are also referred to is brilliant and adds to the relevance of the stories. A murder mystery that will keep you smiling.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kim Dague

    “All The Queen’s Men” is the 2nd S. J.Bennett book to feature Queen Elizabeth as a behind-the-scenes sleuth, solving a Palace murder with the help of her ex-Army assistant private secretary Rozie Oshodi. No sophomore slump here! Starting with a murder and adding in art forgery and a network of palace thieves makes for a book that lovers of twisty mysteries, and all Anglophiles, Royalists, and watchers of “The Crown” will love! I received an ARC from NetGalley. #AllTheQueensMen #NetGalley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    I've found myself reading a number of cosy mysteries recently, making an amusing and pleasant change from my usual gritty, noir choices. I have just finished the highly entertaining 'A Three Dog Problem' by S.J. Bennett, the second novel in her cosy-mystery series, 'Her Majesty the Queen Investigates #2' starring Capt. Rozie Oshodi and of course, Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II! 'Her Majesty the Queen Investigates'has one of the more amusing premises for a detective series, with each tale set w I've found myself reading a number of cosy mysteries recently, making an amusing and pleasant change from my usual gritty, noir choices. I have just finished the highly entertaining 'A Three Dog Problem' by S.J. Bennett, the second novel in her cosy-mystery series, 'Her Majesty the Queen Investigates #2' starring Capt. Rozie Oshodi and of course, Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II! 'Her Majesty the Queen Investigates'has one of the more amusing premises for a detective series, with each tale set within a home of Queen Elizabeth II and involving her covert attempts to resolve the latest mystery from poison pen letters, to murders and theft. All the while, keeping her actions hidden from everyone except her Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie. In this light-hearted and well-paced tale, recent events are causing life to be even more complex than usual. The Queen is dealing with a new Prime Minister (Theresa May) , the fallout from the Brexit referendum, and a tumultuous election in the United States and the possibility of Russian collusion in poisonings! I must admit that I laughed out loud while reading about these real life people and scenarios, against the backdrop of our mystery. It is against this background, that we meet Rozie as the Queen asked her APS to help find a missing painting. Initially, Rozie assumes that this will be a simple inquiry - nothing too taxing, complicated etc. However, as Rozie delves into the works department's actions, there is an unexpected death and soon our intrepid duo are on the track of a violent killer. 'Her Majesty the Queen Investigates' series provides a light=hearted tale with an enjoyable level of detail re the daily life in BP. And the mention of Prince Philip acts a certain poignancy and Rozie is one of the more refreshing characters that I have read in some time.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie H

    I read the first one in this series and I absolutely loved The Windsor Knot and have been waiting and waiting for the sequel. Thank you so much to NetGalley and the publishers for approving me. More sleuthing with her Majesty. Amazing books and can’t wait for more stories.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Linda Hepworth

    This second story in S. J. Bennett’s ‘Her Majesty The Queen Investigates’ series reveals yet more shady goings-on in the Royal Household and more mysteries and crimes for HRH and Rozie Oshodi, her trusted Assistant Private Secretary to investigate. To discover the complexities of what led up to the death of the woman discovered by the swimming pool at the start of the story the reader is taken back three months when, over breakfast, the Queen shares a disturbing discovery with Prince Philip. The This second story in S. J. Bennett’s ‘Her Majesty The Queen Investigates’ series reveals yet more shady goings-on in the Royal Household and more mysteries and crimes for HRH and Rozie Oshodi, her trusted Assistant Private Secretary to investigate. To discover the complexities of what led up to the death of the woman discovered by the swimming pool at the start of the story the reader is taken back three months when, over breakfast, the Queen shares a disturbing discovery with Prince Philip. The previous day, on an official visit to an exhibition of maritime art in Portsmouth she saw a painting of the ex-royal yacht, Britannia, a painting which held huge sentimental value for her. It had once hung on a wall outside her bedroom but had disappeared sometime in the nineties, following decorating works. Determined to have it restored to her, she sets Rozie the task of discovering how it had ended up there and to arrange for its swift return. However, the organiser of the exhibition insists that the artist must have painted more than one copy because this one belonged to the Ministry of Defence and had been lent to the exhibition by the Second Sea Lord. Nevertheless, the Queen knows without any shadow of doubt that she is not mistaken and is determined to that it will be returned to her – but what neither she nor Rozie could possibly have anticipated is what their investigations will uncover, or the lengths some people will go to to prevent the truth from emerging. Attempting to unravel what, if any, the connections are between a spate of poison-pen letters, sudden resignations, the disappearance of valuable paintings, art forgery, dishonest employees, a well-established conspiracy to defraud, suspicious deaths turns out to be a complex business but, as anyone who has read The Windsor Knot will know, nothing will stop this intrepid duo from getting to the truth! Interspersed with all the private investigation work, are HRH’s reflections on contemporary issues (the 2016 referendum, Brexit, Theresa May, the Trump/Clinton election campaign etc) and some insights into the wide range of her official duties, demonstrating not only the ceremonial formality of some aspects of her life, but the meticulous planning which underpins such occasions. Alongside this the reader is treated to imagined (but believable!) conversations with Prince Philip, asides about various members of the family, how she relaxes (with her horses and dogs and spending time with the young grandchildren) and glimpses into the daily routines at Buckingham Palace. The author’s respect, admiration and affection for the Queen permeate her writing but from the many small details which make the story feel so convincing, it’s apparent throughout that she must have done considerable research to enable her to convey such a convincing portrayal of life in the Royal Household. One historical fact she included, to demonstrate that ‘below-stairs’ skulduggery is nothing new, was a reference to how William Fortnum, a footman to Queen Anne, began to demonstrate the entrepreneurial skill which would, in time, lead him to set up in business with a certain Hugh Mason and make his fortune. I had no idea … and if you want to know you’ll have to read the book to find out! In my review of the first book in this series (which I read last autumn) I described the story as ‘a fun read – the perfect antidote to any Covid-blues.’ Although, inevitably I think, this second novel lacks the ‘novelty’ value of the first, I still found it easy to suspend disbelief and to enjoy losing myself in a different world for a few hours. It’s a well-plotted, gently humorous story with a cast of well-developed, eminently believable characters and although there are some dark deeds at the heart of it, an absolute belief that all will turn out well in the end makes the whole process feel rather genteel! The eventual explanation about why the Queen was able to be so adamant that the painting of Britannia was hers was delightfully convincing and, in the light of Prince Philip’s recent death, rather poignant. I also loved the author’s thinking behind her choice of title – partly inspired by Sherlock Holmes who, whenever he had a difficult case to solve had to smoke three pipes, describing it as a ‘three pipe problem’. Faced with a similar problem the Queen needed to take her three dogs for a walk! One thread in the story involves four paintings by the Italian Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi, a woman who achieved success in a man’s world in the seventeenth century. As the Queen and Rozie are the indefatigable sleuths in this story, I loved the fact that the author prefaced the final section of the novel with this famous quote from the artist: ‘You will find the spirit of Caesar in the soul of a woman.’ As the next book in the series (Murder Most Royal) is due to be published in November 2022, it’s clear that our two protagonists still have more cases to solve … so fans of the series will, once more, be allowed to peek behind royal doors! With thanks to Readers First and the publisher for a copy of this book in return for an honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    A terrific cosy mystery featuring one of the most famous women in the world, S.J. Bennett’s A Three Dog Problem is a witty, ingenious and absorbing read that is simply delightful. When the body of a staff member is found dead beside Buckingham Palace swimming pool, Queen Elizabeth II is determined to leave no stone unturned to find out whodunnit. While the police think that this was a tragic accident, Elizabeth’s gut instincts are telling her that there is far more to this story than meets the ey A terrific cosy mystery featuring one of the most famous women in the world, S.J. Bennett’s A Three Dog Problem is a witty, ingenious and absorbing read that is simply delightful. When the body of a staff member is found dead beside Buckingham Palace swimming pool, Queen Elizabeth II is determined to leave no stone unturned to find out whodunnit. While the police think that this was a tragic accident, Elizabeth’s gut instincts are telling her that there is far more to this story than meets the eye. Determined to get to the bottom of this case, Elizabeth begins looking for answers and, as someone who knows Buckingham Palace like the back of her hand, she vows to find the murderer who is hiding in plain sight. However, little do Elizabeth and her trusty assistant Rozie realize that there isn’t just a killer at the palace, but also a thief stalking the corridors of one of globe’s the most famous residences. A treasured painting that had once hung outside the Queen’s bedroom has gone missing. Rozie is dispatched to locate the missing picture, but when a threatening note is sent to the intrepid assistant, it looks like dark forces far too close to home are at play here. With her royal duties giving Elizabeth the perfect alibi to look for clues and see the connections no one else can see, will she manage to find the killer and locate the missing painting? Will she catch the murderer in time? Or are there further shocks in store for the Queen and her assistant Rozie that will leave them wondering just how well they can trust the people around them? Sparkling with royal mischief, red herrings and majestic intrigue, S J Bennett’s A Three Dog Problem is a fun cosy mystery that entertains from beginning to end. In A Three Dog Problem, the story moves at a fast pace, the characters come instantly to life and the twists and turns will have readers rushing to the end desperate to find out how Elizabeth and Rozie manage to piece it all together and solve this case. An enjoyable cosy mystery perfect for losing oneself in, A Three Dog Problem is a must-read in S J Bennett’s series featuring everyone’s favourite royal: Queen Elizabeth II. I voluntarily read and reviewed an Advanced Reader Copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kiwiflora

    Hilariously joyful piece of reading. The Queen must be one of the world's favourite people, always honourable, overflowing with integrity and goodness, and now she is solving murders. Go Queen! Not just a pretty face in gorgeous clothes and fabulous hats. Although with her busy schedule micromanaged to the n-th degree, how she finds time to solve a murder without actually letting on that she has done so, that she that the credit has to go to the police/detectives/palace security - the profession Hilariously joyful piece of reading. The Queen must be one of the world's favourite people, always honourable, overflowing with integrity and goodness, and now she is solving murders. Go Queen! Not just a pretty face in gorgeous clothes and fabulous hats. Although with her busy schedule micromanaged to the n-th degree, how she finds time to solve a murder without actually letting on that she has done so, that she that the credit has to go to the police/detectives/palace security - the professionals is quite entertaining in itself. Such a diplomat. Perfect for the job. All that training from birth has made her the most discrete, observant and deliberately charming person you could hope to meet. The story opens in Buck Pal, with the discovery of the body of a long time Palace employee lying beside the indoor swimming pool. A murder in the Palace! The Queen has a terrific secretary called Rosie, a young woman with a defence background, smart, resourceful and, best of all, trusted by the Queen. Together these two work around the rules and very tight Palace protocols, careful not to tread on all those toes planting themselves in their way, to find out what is really going on below stairs at the Palace. At the same time the Queen notices, quite by chance, that a favourite painting of the royal yacht Britannia is no longer hanging outside her bedroom. Where has it gone? This is a clever story, witty dialogue, lots of intrigues, gossip, rumour, distrust and paranoia lurking everywhere. And all that protocol and etiquette to have to deal with! It is clear the author adores the Queen and everything she stands for, and how refreshing to see the royal family portrayed in a glowing, personable and delightful way. This is a delight to read, I loved it, lots of fun. Looking forward to number 3 in the series!

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