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Crispin Guest is summoned to a London priory to unmask a merciless killer. Can he discover who is committing the deadliest of sins? 1399, London. A drink at the Boar’s Tusk takes an unexpected turn for Crispin Guest, Tracker of London, and his apprentice, Jack Tucker, when a messenger claims the prioress at St. Frideswide wants to hire him to investigate murders at the pri Crispin Guest is summoned to a London priory to unmask a merciless killer. Can he discover who is committing the deadliest of sins? 1399, London. A drink at the Boar’s Tusk takes an unexpected turn for Crispin Guest, Tracker of London, and his apprentice, Jack Tucker, when a messenger claims the prioress at St. Frideswide wants to hire him to investigate murders at the priory. Two of Prioress Drueta’s nuns have been killed in a way that signifies two of the Seven Deadly Sins, and she’s at her wits end. Meanwhile, trouble is brewing outside of London when the exiled Henry Bolingbroke, the new Duke of Lancaster, returns to England’s shores with an army to take back his inheritance. Crispin is caught between solving the crimes at St. Frideswide’s Priory, and making a choice once more whether to stand with King Richard or commit treason again.


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Crispin Guest is summoned to a London priory to unmask a merciless killer. Can he discover who is committing the deadliest of sins? 1399, London. A drink at the Boar’s Tusk takes an unexpected turn for Crispin Guest, Tracker of London, and his apprentice, Jack Tucker, when a messenger claims the prioress at St. Frideswide wants to hire him to investigate murders at the pri Crispin Guest is summoned to a London priory to unmask a merciless killer. Can he discover who is committing the deadliest of sins? 1399, London. A drink at the Boar’s Tusk takes an unexpected turn for Crispin Guest, Tracker of London, and his apprentice, Jack Tucker, when a messenger claims the prioress at St. Frideswide wants to hire him to investigate murders at the priory. Two of Prioress Drueta’s nuns have been killed in a way that signifies two of the Seven Deadly Sins, and she’s at her wits end. Meanwhile, trouble is brewing outside of London when the exiled Henry Bolingbroke, the new Duke of Lancaster, returns to England’s shores with an army to take back his inheritance. Crispin is caught between solving the crimes at St. Frideswide’s Priory, and making a choice once more whether to stand with King Richard or commit treason again.

51 review for The Deadliest Sin

  1. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Many thanks to NetGalley and Severn House for this Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review The Deadliest Sin. All opinions and comments are my own. The fifteenth -- and last -- Crispin Guest book finds Crispin at the bedside of the dying Duke of Lancaster. It has been twenty-two years since he was banished from court, losing everything. But now he is satisfied with his “job” as The Tracker, solving crimes, finding bad people, even murderers. Will things change, though? There are rumors Many thanks to NetGalley and Severn House for this Advanced Reader Copy and the opportunity to review The Deadliest Sin. All opinions and comments are my own. The fifteenth -- and last -- Crispin Guest book finds Crispin at the bedside of the dying Duke of Lancaster. It has been twenty-two years since he was banished from court, losing everything. But now he is satisfied with his “job” as The Tracker, solving crimes, finding bad people, even murderers. Will things change, though? There are rumors that the exiled Henry, son of the duke, is making his way back to England. But before that, Crispin has a job; find the killer of two nuns at a local priory, dispatched in ways that mirror elements of the seven deadly sins. Is the murderer the ghost that’s been sighted? Crispin isn’t falling for that, but there are odd occurrences that will keep him on his toes for the length of The Deadliest Sin. Our secondary story concerns his ongoing relationship with Philippa Walcote, the mother of his son (unacknowledged, of course). Her husband is a well-respected mercer in town, and although she and Crispin cast covetous looks at each other, that’s as far as it can go. Philippa goes “undercover” to see if she can find anything out about the murders. This doesn’t last long when another nun is killed. Crispin soon finds out the priest of the priory has his secrets and sins, too. He learns that the priory is supplying potions for miscarriages. There are those that are not happy with a place that would be doing something like that. Could this be a motive for murder? Underneath all this investigation is the rumors going about on what Henry is doing. Will he become King now, and what will King Richard do? And how will all this affect Crispin? (History records that this is exactly what happened, and that Henry will soon become Henry IV, the new King of England.) Crispin decides to do some digging – literally, and surprise! Something awaits them in the churchyard. Crispin and Jack, his assistant need to do more thinking about what is really going on here. Who’s really taking revenge, and why? It’s all figured out, of course. For there’s a new power in town that must be greeted. So, Henry comes, and Richard goes. And rewards are offered, and received. An Afterword explains the “stranger than fiction” nun’s tale that the author, Jeri Westerson used in her story, the fall of Richard, and medieval science’s views on ending pregnancy. She also includes her thoughts on her last book and her thanks to her readers. I for one will definitely miss The Tracker and his world. But then again, reading that Afterword… in any event, The Deadliest Sin offers up a solid story, with excellent, engaging characters and an entertaining plotline.

  2. 4 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Medieval noir series brought to a close! I’ve been putting off reading this last Crispin Guest tale for weeks. Why? I can’t bear the fact that this is his last hooray. I first met Crispin in 2013 in “Veil of Lies” and hunted down the previous series titles published fervently. I have waited breathlessly each subsequent year for the next stage in Crispin’s life, the next mysterious relic that will find its way to him for resolution. The next involvement that will prove dangerous and test the Track Medieval noir series brought to a close! I’ve been putting off reading this last Crispin Guest tale for weeks. Why? I can’t bear the fact that this is his last hooray. I first met Crispin in 2013 in “Veil of Lies” and hunted down the previous series titles published fervently. I have waited breathlessly each subsequent year for the next stage in Crispin’s life, the next mysterious relic that will find its way to him for resolution. The next involvement that will prove dangerous and test the Tracker and his right hand assistant’s fortitude. Ive seen Crispin grow and strengthen despite his weaknesses. And don’t let me get started on Jack Tucker. An amazing character and a great foil to Crispin’s shortcomings. As a youngster to watch him grow was a pleasure. As a father and the Tracker’s assistant he’s a pleasure. Now he provides for Crispin balance and family—belonging. In some ways he’s been the squire that Crispin could never have. The Crispin now is much more complicated. He’s lived with the general populace. He understands integrity is not a class prerogative. In this 1399 story, murders in a priory are investigated by Crispin, relics are present, jealousy and love encircle the matter. Jack of course becomes involved, as does Philippa Walcote and Crispin’s son Christopher, whom he can’t acknowledge. On the political front John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and Crispin’s mentor is dying. Richard the Second’s power and popularity is waning, and Henry of Lancaster’s star is rising. Fraught times, with Crispin finding himself thrust into the melėe that Kings, and would be Kingship, brings about. (Once again Westerton’s Afterward is enlightening). I am content with the way we leave Crispin and the future that stretches before him. He’s a character who’s endured much, grown amazingly despite his many flaws, and is by many of his fellow actors, and by me. Adieu Crispin Guest aka The Tracker, a colorful character, a medieval detective, who sits squarely and fabulously into the Medieval Noir genre. A Canongate-Severn ARC via NetGalley (Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lesa

    Jeri Westerson brings the story of Crispin Guest, London’s Tracker, to a close in a medieval historical novel that brought tears to my eyes. Anyone who has followed Crispin’s story will be filled with regret, but will also cheer as the story culminates in The Deadliest Sin. For fifteen books, Westerson has told the story of the disgraced knight forced to live by his wits on the streets of London. By February 1399, Crispin is in his mid-forties. He lives with Jack Tucker, his apprentice, and Jack’ Jeri Westerson brings the story of Crispin Guest, London’s Tracker, to a close in a medieval historical novel that brought tears to my eyes. Anyone who has followed Crispin’s story will be filled with regret, but will also cheer as the story culminates in The Deadliest Sin. For fifteen books, Westerson has told the story of the disgraced knight forced to live by his wits on the streets of London. By February 1399, Crispin is in his mid-forties. He lives with Jack Tucker, his apprentice, and Jack’s growing family in the Shambles. The pair continue to investigate murders and crimes in London, so the Lady Prioress at St. Frideswide Prirory hires them to investigate the murders of two nuns. It’s not an easy case because the Prioress Drueta Rowebern won’t allow the men in the nuns’ dormitory. Crispin is appalled to learn the state of the murders. One nun was found near the pigsty with food stuffed down her throat. The second one was smothered, wrapped in blankets from all the others. But, when screams send him running to the church, and he sees the condition of the third body, he begins to understand. This nun has coins coming out of her mouth. And, all three bodies are reflections of the painting in the church that depicts the Seven Deadly Sins. As Crispin and Jack investigate, they learn the deaths are connected to an earlier death, that of the nun responsible for the apothecary. But, everyone says Dame Audrey died of a fever. When Crispin’s former lover, Philippa, and her son volunteer to help in the case, and Philippa is attacked, Crispin starts to suspect there’s more to this case than anger. Gravedigging, confrontational nuns, and additional crimes help Crispin and Jack wrap up the case. However, The Deadliest Sin also represents the conclusion to the historical storyline of the mystery series. Crispin Guest is a disgraced knight, stripped of his rank, his lands, his honor, for plotting against Richard II. Guest was always a Lancaster man. In February, 1399, John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster, is dying, and Guest is allowed at his bedside. Lancaster was Guest’s mentor, the man who raised him from the age of seven, although he was forced to deny him because of Crispin’s treason. In fact, Richard II has banished Lancaster’s son, Henry. By the time Crispin and Jack have concluded their case, Henry is in London after marching through England. How will Crispin Guest be treated if there is a new Lancaster king on the throne? Westerson skillfully wraps up the series with the elements that have been essential in these mysteries, Guest’s life as London’s Tracker, an interesting case involving the religious life and even missing relics, and the historical elements. It’s sad to leave Crispin Guest behind, but there are triumphant moments for London’s Tracker.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    The Deadliest Sin Earns 5+/5 Religious Relics…Compelling, Clever Favorite! It’s August, 1399. Crispin Guest, the well-known Tracker of London, opines that the summer’s heat that aggravates the heat of emotions, will soon bring about a client who wishes to engage him to investigate a crime that has led to murder. [Enter a young messenger.] “You’re that Tracker they talk of, aren’t you?” The Lady Prioress of Saint Frideswide Priory is distressed by the recent deaths at the priory. First, the apothe The Deadliest Sin Earns 5+/5 Religious Relics…Compelling, Clever Favorite! It’s August, 1399. Crispin Guest, the well-known Tracker of London, opines that the summer’s heat that aggravates the heat of emotions, will soon bring about a client who wishes to engage him to investigate a crime that has led to murder. [Enter a young messenger.] “You’re that Tracker they talk of, aren’t you?” The Lady Prioress of Saint Frideswide Priory is distressed by the recent deaths at the priory. First, the apothecary died suddenly of fever, then, days later, two nuns died under gruesome circumstances. While at the priory reviewing the details and under their noses, a theft is discovered as well as a third victim. Crispin is intrigued by the murders eerily appearing to reference a mural at the priory depicting the seven deadly sins. Motive is difficult to identify, but more worrisome is the killer may be inside the priory. Crispin’s attentions, however, are not fully on the task for which he’s been hired; with each new day reports arrive of the disgruntled Henry Bolingbroke’s march on London to regain, by force if needed, his inheritance taken by the crown, but it is his former squire, Edward Grafton, now held in high esteem at court, who may be the greater disappointment. Jeri Westerson has done Crispin Guest proud, and left me in tears, with a brilliant final book in this medieval noir mystery. She’s linked multiple murders to the “Seven Deadly Sins” and resolved well storylines shared throughout the series. Her engaging narrative describes a fascinating history behind the priory itself, the meaning of the relics housed there, use of herbal remedies, and even rumors of a centuries-old ghost. Crispin’s dogged methods of investigation uncovers varied theories and motives and impediments from the strong-willed prioress, guarded witnesses and suspects, and uncooperative priest. It is his wit and cleverness, his apprentice’s eagerness and budding expertise, and an undercover scheme, however, that prove Crispin’s worth as a medieval detective. The endearing father/son dynamic twice over, a gripping mystery, shocking conclusion, historical details, and references to class and gender struggles makes this a top favorite for 2021! The medieval era with which many, like me, are not very familiar, Jeri has included a valuable “Glossary,” yet Ebook readers might find it more convenient to have specific words linked to their definition or insights for real-time help…just saying. And do not overlook the “Afterword.” It is additionally informative. Disclosure: I received an ARC from Severn House thru NetGalley. My review is voluntary with honest insights and comments.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine

    3 February 1399, Leicester Castle. Jeri Westerson’s The Deadliest Sin (Crispin Guest Medieval Noir Mystery, #15) begins with John of Gaunt’s final words with Crispin at John of Gaunt’s death bed. Plus, this is the final book of Crispin Guest Medieval Noir Mysteries, and I shall miss this series extremely as I have enjoyed every single mystery. Crispen, a disgraced knight and protégée of John of Gaunt, at the beginning of this creative series, thought John of Gaunt, fourth son of Edward III, woul 3 February 1399, Leicester Castle. Jeri Westerson’s The Deadliest Sin (Crispin Guest Medieval Noir Mystery, #15) begins with John of Gaunt’s final words with Crispin at John of Gaunt’s death bed. Plus, this is the final book of Crispin Guest Medieval Noir Mysteries, and I shall miss this series extremely as I have enjoyed every single mystery. Crispen, a disgraced knight and protégée of John of Gaunt, at the beginning of this creative series, thought John of Gaunt, fourth son of Edward III, would be the best choice for king instead of Edward III’s first son, the now deceased Black Prince’s son, 10 year old Richard who becomes Richard II. All of the ‘traitors’ except Crispen were executed. Richard’s uncle, John of Gaunt pleaded for Crispen’s life. Crispen was spared, but stripped of of his title, lands - everything. Crispen, starting from scratch, became known as The Tracker of London. He solved crimes to make his living. Enter: Jack Tucker, a young person of the streets who was a petty thief. Together they solved these crimes with Jack as Crispen’s apprentence. 20 years pass, and the last crime, found in this book, concerns deaths of nuns in St. Frideswide Priory. A character states” Everything is in full circle, isn’t it?” I will not name the character as it may be a ‘spoiler’, but the author winds up this series with a ‘full circle of events.’ 4 stars for this installment, but 5+ for the entire series. I shall miss Crispen and Jack. I wish them well! “It takes a village and one village idiot to have a writing career.” This statement is written by the author in the beginning of this book. I thought that it is quite clever!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Simona

    It's a rare thing to find a good closure to a series. Recommended. It's a rare thing to find a good closure to a series. Recommended.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality Pride is one of those infamous “Seven Deadly Sins”. It’s also the one that “goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall”, at least according to Proverbs 16, verse 18 of the King James Version of the Bible. Which was still more than two centuries in the future at the close of this final book in the Crispin Guest series. Which does not make the verse any less apropos. Because this is a story about pride. The blind pride of the Prioress at St. Originally published at Reading Reality Pride is one of those infamous “Seven Deadly Sins”. It’s also the one that “goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall”, at least according to Proverbs 16, verse 18 of the King James Version of the Bible. Which was still more than two centuries in the future at the close of this final book in the Crispin Guest series. Which does not make the verse any less apropos. Because this is a story about pride. The blind pride of the Prioress at St. Frideswide’s Priory, the ambitious pride of Henry of Bolingbroke, the long-ago pride and puissance of the late John of Gaunt, the privileged but unearned pride of Richard of Bordeaux, and last but not least the battered pride of Crispin Guest, once lord, former knight, convicted traitor to the king that is about to be deposed, but loyal to the death to the king that is about to be. But while all this pride is swirling in the air and down the length and breadth of England, someone is killing the Holy Sisters of St. Frideswide’s Priory and staging their bodies in a gruesome parody of the mural of the Seven Deadly Sins that serves as a chilling backdrop to the reliquary of St. Frideswide’s relics. Even if some of those relics have been stolen. After all, greed is also one of those seven deadly sins. Crispin Guest has been reluctantly (very reluctantly) called to the Priory to investigate a string of murders. It’s what he does as the infamous “Tracker of London”. The Prioress’ grudging cooperation and high-handed stonewalling isn’t enough to keep him from figuring out who committed the crimes, but his distraction over the changes sweeping the country and the monarchy make the solution more elusive than it should be. On every side. Escape Rating A-: Not every historical mystery series involves itself as much with the politics of its day along with the mystery, but from this reader’s perspective it seems like the best ones do, going all the way back to Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series along with Candace Robb’s Owen Archer and C.S. Harris’ Sebastian St. Cyr series right alongside Crispin Guest. All these series take place during one succession crisis or another in English history, and all of the detectives had some involvement, great or small, in the roiling political climate of their day. (If you’re wondering, the Cadfael series takes place during the succession war between King Stephen and Empress Maud, Owen Archer protects the city of York as the curtain goes up on the Wars of the Roses, Crispin Guest is collateral damage in that same war as it heats up and royal heads start rolling, while St. Cyr is operating during the Regency, which was itself an inventive solution to the succession crisis that followed in the wake of George III losing the American Colonies and his mind.) The politics were built into this series from its beginning, all the way back in Veil of Lies, published in 2008. At that point, Crispin had lost everything except his life as part of a plot to push Richard II off the throne and put John of Gaunt on it. (The Wars of the Roses happened because Edward III had too many sons who survived to reproduce, and all of them fought over who had the right to be king in one succession crisis after another from Edward’s death in 1377 to Richard III’s death at Bosworth Field in 1487. So readers have followed along with Crispin as he learned to be a commoner, and as he honed his skills as the “Tracker of London”. By the time this story takes place in 1399, Crispin has been the Tracker for 15 years. He’s not just learned to survive, but he’s actually become mostly content with his circumstances, only for his entire life to be upended once again. Crispin’s final case is a troubling one. Someone is murdering nuns inside a closed priory and posing their bodies in horrific tableaus. The Prioress wants the murders solved, but stands in the way of Crispin’s every attempt to solve them. She has her own vision of the work and life of her priory, and doesn’t want anyone to spoil her illusions. As if three, then four dead sisters didn’t spoil it quite enough. Without forensics, Crispin is forced to rely on his wits, his memory, and on his opponent making a mistake, while he’s distracted by events in the kingdom that might serve as vindication for his long-ago trials, or that might change his life. Meanwhile, the priory that is supposed to be a haven of religious service is actually a hotbed of sin, vice and favoritism that the prioress doesn’t want Crispin to see – or expose. The situation is a mess, as so many of the situations Crispin gets himself into are. It’s also an unexpected ending. An ending that Crispin is afraid to anticipate out of fear of having his hopes dashed yet again. I was sorry to see this much-beloved series come to an end, although the end is in all ways fitting, as Crispin’s journey from disgrace to penitence to vindication has come full circle. But there’s this niggling sensation at the end that, as content as Crispin now is with his restored life and honors, he misses the intellectual challenge of being the Tracker. And that it might just be possible to lure him back. I sincerely hope so.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jean Kolinofsky

    Jeri Westerson brings her Crispin Guest series to a close with The Deadliest Sin. Known as the Tracker of London, he is called to Saint Frideswide Priory to investigate the murder of two nuns. Staged to depict two of the seven deadly sins, the prioress fears that there may be more murders to come. With his apprentice Jack Tucker, Crispen begins his investigation, only to have another nun murdered as they search for answers. Prior to the murders, another nun had supposedly died of a fever but Cri Jeri Westerson brings her Crispin Guest series to a close with The Deadliest Sin. Known as the Tracker of London, he is called to Saint Frideswide Priory to investigate the murder of two nuns. Staged to depict two of the seven deadly sins, the prioress fears that there may be more murders to come. With his apprentice Jack Tucker, Crispen begins his investigation, only to have another nun murdered as they search for answers. Prior to the murders, another nun had supposedly died of a fever but Crispin suspects she may have been the first victim. Faced with little information from the remaining nuns and hostility from the caretaker and Father Holbrook, Crispin and Jack are forced to accept assistance from lady Walcote and her son Christopher. They enter the Priory as a visiting nun and an assistant to the caretaker to observe and learn what they can. What Crispin discovers is that the Priory is the scene of more than murder. There is also blackmail, deception and questionable practices by the apothecary. Crispin Guest was once a knight before being branded a traitor for siding with the Duke of Lancaster against King Richard. Lancaster is now dead but his son Henry is returning from exile to dethrone Richard. Crispin lost his title and lands, but the arrival of Henry now puts everything that he now has in jeopardy. Jack and his wife and children provide the family that he never had. His son with Lady Walcote, who was raised as the son of Clarence Walcote, is now aware of his true parentage and looks up to Crispin. Westerson gives Crispin a well-deserved ending that leaves you with warm feelings for Crispin and Jack. At the same time it was saddening to realize that this is the last adventure. I have enjoyed every book in this series and will definitely miss Crispin Guest. I would like to thank NetGalley and Severn House for providing this book for my review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Julie Carlson

    If Dashiell Hammett or Raymond Chandler decided to write a medieval mystery, then they would have Crispin Guest as the detective. Crispin is the Tracker of London during the reign of Richard II. The Deadliest Sin is the final book of the Crispin series, but since I had read a few of the books, I had no trouble with the back story. Crispin was a knight and baron for John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster. At the start of Richard II's reign, Crispin was convicted of treason against the crown, but instea If Dashiell Hammett or Raymond Chandler decided to write a medieval mystery, then they would have Crispin Guest as the detective. Crispin is the Tracker of London during the reign of Richard II. The Deadliest Sin is the final book of the Crispin series, but since I had read a few of the books, I had no trouble with the back story. Crispin was a knight and baron for John of Gaunt, duke of Lancaster. At the start of Richard II's reign, Crispin was convicted of treason against the crown, but instead of being executed, he was stripped of his title/land/possessions and banished from court. He makes his living as the Tracker (basically a private detective). He is joined by his apprentice, Jack Tucker. In this new book, Crispin is hired by the prioress at St. Frideswide to investigate the murders of two nuns. In a secondary but vital plot, John of Gaunt has died and his heir Henry Bolingbroke has been exiled from England. Now Henry is marching through England to regain his inheritance. Crispin has made no secret that he remains loyal to the House of Lancaster, but will he commit treason again against Richard if called upon by Henry? This book had a very satisfying ending and was a good way to close this series. Crispin is an honorable man, even when faced with horrible circumstances. He is quite likable as a character, as is Jack. Although this series doesn't have the authentic feel of the Paul Doherty "Brother Athelstan" series, it is a solid and unique set of books. Thank you NetGalley and Canongate/Severn for this ARC. The book will be released at the end of November.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Luc

    Another rollicking and action-packed adventure with the genial Crispin Guest at the dawn of one of the most tumultuous centuries in English history. This time around, Guest, the genial Tracker of London, is called upon to untangle and try to resolve some rather unsavory goings-on taking place within the walls of a priory in London where an unscrupulous killer is wreaking havoc among the community. Nuns are gruesomely murdered and the Deadly Seven Sins are definitely invoked by the killer when it Another rollicking and action-packed adventure with the genial Crispin Guest at the dawn of one of the most tumultuous centuries in English history. This time around, Guest, the genial Tracker of London, is called upon to untangle and try to resolve some rather unsavory goings-on taking place within the walls of a priory in London where an unscrupulous killer is wreaking havoc among the community. Nuns are gruesomely murdered and the Deadly Seven Sins are definitely invoked by the killer when it comes to staging the killings...... Then it's also 1399, and England is teetering on the brink of civil war. The new Duke of Lancaster, Henry of Bolingbroke is back in town & more determined than ever to send his royal cousin Richard II packing and usurpe the crown.... Crispin, an ancient ward of Bolingbroke's late father, John of Gaunt, will have the difficult task to choose between his expected loyalty towards the current & legitimate monarch to whom he owes allegiance and his deeply rooted bonds with the Lancastrian clan.... A magnificent blend of historical fiction and murder mystery, fiendishly plotted and blessed with a cast of unforgettable characters that kept me entertained and enthralled long into the night! I hope that Jeri Westerson will bring back the winsome Crispin back into my life soon🤞 Go ahead and enjoy without any moderation whatsoever and please read the previous titles available in the compelling and highly entertaining series👍👍 Many thanks to Netgalley and Canongate/Severn for this terrific ARC.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    Jeri Westerson's The Deadliest Sin is intended to be the last volume in her Crispin Guest mystery series. Set near the turn of the 14th Century, The Deadliest Sin follows two plot lines: one in which Tracker of London Crispin Guest is called to investigate a series of murders at Saint Frideswide's Priory, some of which seem connected to the seven deadly sins, and the triumph of Henry IV over Richard II. Guest, formerly a noble, lost his hereditary title and property when he supported an earlier Jeri Westerson's The Deadliest Sin is intended to be the last volume in her Crispin Guest mystery series. Set near the turn of the 14th Century, The Deadliest Sin follows two plot lines: one in which Tracker of London Crispin Guest is called to investigate a series of murders at Saint Frideswide's Priory, some of which seem connected to the seven deadly sins, and the triumph of Henry IV over Richard II. Guest, formerly a noble, lost his hereditary title and property when he supported an earlier bchallenge to the rule of Richard II. He's rebuilt his life as a Tracker (essentially a private detective), and the return of Henry raises the threat of the charges of treason that he barely escaped previously. With its dual plot lines, the novel is a bit like a quilt: alternating pieces of one fabric, then another. The mystery at the novel's center is "messy," with the relationship among the ongoing murders unclear. Ultimately all is resolved, both at St. Frideswide and in the English Court—and in the private life of Guest as well. This novel provides pleasant enough fare for lovers of historical mysteries—neither completely predictable nor high literature. If you enjoy the genre, particularly when it involves crucial historical moments and issues of social class, you'll find The Deadliest Sin an entertaining read. I received a free electronic review copy of this title from the publisher via NetGalley; the opinions are my own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    Don't be deterred from reading this if you haven't read the earlier books because, even though it's the last one, it's still a cracking good story that mixes historical fiction with an intriguing mystery. Crispin, a disgraced knight who now works as a detective, along with his apprentice Jack, is investigating the gruesome murders of nuns who have been killed in a way that invokes the seven deadly sins (no spoilers on how that's done). Who would do such a thing? Equally important, however, is th Don't be deterred from reading this if you haven't read the earlier books because, even though it's the last one, it's still a cracking good story that mixes historical fiction with an intriguing mystery. Crispin, a disgraced knight who now works as a detective, along with his apprentice Jack, is investigating the gruesome murders of nuns who have been killed in a way that invokes the seven deadly sins (no spoilers on how that's done). Who would do such a thing? Equally important, however, is the return to England of Henry Bolingbrooke, who wants to take back the crown. I'm a little hazy on events during this period and found myself doing a little side research after finishing the book- which packs a lot into a slim volume. This one will pull you in and keep you guessing. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. Great read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Angie Taylor

    I first came to this series of books with little hope: there had been too many disappointing characters who either had no depth or no development and too many more who could have gone so much further had their creators allowed it. However, in Crispin Guest, I found depth and charm and I saw early evidence of his growth so I stayed with the series and it was certainly one of my better decisions. Now the series has ended and, while I’ll not spoil the ending, I will say the final book has held me s I first came to this series of books with little hope: there had been too many disappointing characters who either had no depth or no development and too many more who could have gone so much further had their creators allowed it. However, in Crispin Guest, I found depth and charm and I saw early evidence of his growth so I stayed with the series and it was certainly one of my better decisions. Now the series has ended and, while I’ll not spoil the ending, I will say the final book has held me spellbound all day. There is much I could or should have accomplished today but, alas, Crispin’s final journey held sway and I regret not one moment of it. An excellent book, an excellent series and an excellent way to spend a Sunday. Thank you Jeri Westerson, for the pleasure you have given this reader. I await your next venture with genuine hope.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Full review is on My Blog I'm also on Twitter and Instagram The mystery in this novel was a fun and twisty one, full of murder and theft and nuns! With! Secrets! It would have been a great read on its own, but I was so focused on all the stuff with Henry Bolingbroke and Richard II that the mystery sort of fell to the wayside with me on this one. Not because it wasn’t good or anything. I just wanted to know how it would all end! After the mystery was solved, I found myself covering up any part o Full review is on My Blog I'm also on Twitter and Instagram The mystery in this novel was a fun and twisty one, full of murder and theft and nuns! With! Secrets! It would have been a great read on its own, but I was so focused on all the stuff with Henry Bolingbroke and Richard II that the mystery sort of fell to the wayside with me on this one. Not because it wasn’t good or anything. I just wanted to know how it would all end! After the mystery was solved, I found myself covering up any part of the page I hadn’t read yet so that I wouldn’t accidentally read too far ahead and spoil myself. I think that is a mark of a terrific story.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rekha O'Sullivan

    Thanks to Netgalley, Severn House and the author for an ARC of this book. I am leaving this review voluntarily. This is the end of a wonderful series and I am sorry to see it reach its close. I first picked up a 'Tracker' book about three years ago and, whilst I had read a lot of historical mysteries, found something absolutely unique about this character. In this last instalment Crispin and Jack have to figure out who is killing nuns in the style of the Seven Deadly Sins while political tensions Thanks to Netgalley, Severn House and the author for an ARC of this book. I am leaving this review voluntarily. This is the end of a wonderful series and I am sorry to see it reach its close. I first picked up a 'Tracker' book about three years ago and, whilst I had read a lot of historical mysteries, found something absolutely unique about this character. In this last instalment Crispin and Jack have to figure out who is killing nuns in the style of the Seven Deadly Sins while political tensions rise and he continues to fight his attraction to his married lover. It's all wrapped up very nicely and I closed the book with a smile on my face but I can't say anymore because it will spoil things for you. Just read it. And then do what I am going to do and go back to the beginning and read them all again.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Booknblues

    So after reading several first of a series books in November it seems only fitting that I should read a book which is last of the series,The Deadliest Sin by Jeri Westerson, which I have given 5 stars not for individual merit, but based on my love of the series. Crispin Guest, The Tracker of London has starred in 15 books and in this last one set in 1399, he solves and intricate mystery of deaths in a nunnery. Besides for the mystery we are given a resolution for poor Crispin whose saga began in So after reading several first of a series books in November it seems only fitting that I should read a book which is last of the series,The Deadliest Sin by Jeri Westerson, which I have given 5 stars not for individual merit, but based on my love of the series. Crispin Guest, The Tracker of London has starred in 15 books and in this last one set in 1399, he solves and intricate mystery of deaths in a nunnery. Besides for the mystery we are given a resolution for poor Crispin whose saga began in 1383 and has continued through 1399. For historians who may recognize the significance of the latter date, it also has to do with the final resolution, which was quite satisfying after all this time of reading.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    The last instalment in one of my favorite historical mystery series! I was sad to let the Trucker and Jack go but happy to read the epilogue. This is a dark, twisty and gripping mystery but it's also an excellent historical novel as the mystery is solved quite soon in the book. It was as compelling and entertaining as usual. I read it slowly because I had to say goodbye to a series I loved. An excellent story, highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions The last instalment in one of my favorite historical mystery series! I was sad to let the Trucker and Jack go but happy to read the epilogue. This is a dark, twisty and gripping mystery but it's also an excellent historical novel as the mystery is solved quite soon in the book. It was as compelling and entertaining as usual. I read it slowly because I had to say goodbye to a series I loved. An excellent story, highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christianne Swearson

    This book wraps up the series in such a satisfying and moving way. Crispin Guest has been an intriguing character and a wonderful window into all aspects of medieval life. Jeri Westerson added so many fun and interesting details about daily life and the way of thinking and behaving in all levels of society. I may have to go back and reread some of the early ones! A fond farewell to a charming character.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Ms. Westerson has warned us for the past few books that the end of the series was drawing near, and The Deadliest Sin wraps up the story of Crispin Guest, from attainted former knight to Tracker of London, and his loyal apprentice, Jack Tucker. Crispin has been called to investigate the murder of nuns at a local priory, each in the manner of a Deadly Sin, as depicted in the priory church. Meanwhile, Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster, has arrived in England and is advancing on London to take b Ms. Westerson has warned us for the past few books that the end of the series was drawing near, and The Deadliest Sin wraps up the story of Crispin Guest, from attainted former knight to Tracker of London, and his loyal apprentice, Jack Tucker. Crispin has been called to investigate the murder of nuns at a local priory, each in the manner of a Deadly Sin, as depicted in the priory church. Meanwhile, Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster, has arrived in England and is advancing on London to take back his inheritance, and Crispin must decide whether his loyalty is to King Richard II or to the family he served as a knight. A very satisfying ending to the Crispin Guest tale.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Barbara S.

    Great end to the series This story tied up all loose ends in a most satisfactory way. Perhaps Christopher will become the next Tracker, or little Crispen. We can only hope. Thanks, Jeri, for many hours of enjoyment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Wahlstrom

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It was a great way to end the series and tie up the loose ends. So glad that Crispin wasn't killed off! It was a great way to end the series and tie up the loose ends. So glad that Crispin wasn't killed off!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Started 2022 by finishing the 15th and final Crispin Guest novel. In spite of a rather abrupt moral 180 I felt the character took towards the end of this tale, I still enjoyed it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    You're a good man Sir Crispin. Thank you, Jeri Westerson, for introducing us. You're a good man Sir Crispin. Thank you, Jeri Westerson, for introducing us.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    I will miss this series! A perfect ending to a perfect series. I am sorry it has come to an end though. I will miss Crispin Guest and all his friends!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Priest

    An amazing ending book to an excellent series. Even though I am sad the Crispin Guest series has ended, I enjoyed the way the author wrapped up the series. Thank you to the author for this series. I'm looking forward to your other books / series. An amazing ending book to an excellent series. Even though I am sad the Crispin Guest series has ended, I enjoyed the way the author wrapped up the series. Thank you to the author for this series. I'm looking forward to your other books / series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Tican

    London 1399. London's Tracker Crispin and his apprentice housemate friend Jack Tucker were called to Frideswide Priory (a fictional entity assigned by the author) because of two nuns' murders. It must be mentioned here that Frideswide Priory was one that housed a saint whose relics represented her victory against the 7 Deadly Sins. Crispin was summoned because the Lady Prioress was adamant that the deaths were Church's business not the Crown's... thus the sheriffs and the coroner were not even i London 1399. London's Tracker Crispin and his apprentice housemate friend Jack Tucker were called to Frideswide Priory (a fictional entity assigned by the author) because of two nuns' murders. It must be mentioned here that Frideswide Priory was one that housed a saint whose relics represented her victory against the 7 Deadly Sins. Crispin was summoned because the Lady Prioress was adamant that the deaths were Church's business not the Crown's... thus the sheriffs and the coroner were not even informed. Because Crispin as well as any other man was forbidden access to the nuns' dorter... Phillipa Walcote (Crispin's long ago lover and the mother of his bastard son, Christopher) insisted on helping. With the consent of the Prioress, she would pose as a visiting nun and Christopher would come as a gardener so he could watch over his mother. While Crispin and company were investigating the murders, Henry of Lancaster was marching towards the capital collecting supporters along the way as he was welcomed instead of fazed with opposition for the most part of his historic trek to regain what was his by right. As this would be the final book in the beloved series... Crispin Guest would finally get his reward for his steadfast loyalty to the House of Lancaster. He would also have his last moments with one of his charges... for he had taught and held affection for both cousins ~ Richard and the younger Henry ~ when he was a Lancastrian household knight; also there was a poignant mortified moment in one this series' books* when King Richard admitted to Crispin that he had loved him. But as history and reality would have it, the kingdom could not have both a deposed king and a reigning one... and so Richard had to die (he was starved to death or he refused sustenance until he expired of hunger). Another tragic event in a long checkered line covering England's history of Kings. *maybe in Shadow Of The Alchemist ~ Book 6 of the series p.s. ~ FREE from ibookpile.in

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  28. 4 out of 5

    Linda Barbee

  29. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  30. 5 out of 5

    g

  31. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  32. 4 out of 5

    Denise McLean

  33. 5 out of 5

    Vivian

  34. 4 out of 5

    Grace Freeman

  35. 5 out of 5

    Juli

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Buck

  37. 5 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

  38. 4 out of 5

    Sue

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  40. 4 out of 5

    Pastel

  41. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  42. 4 out of 5

    Rose

  43. 5 out of 5

    Jeffner

  44. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Mrenna

  45. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  46. 5 out of 5

    Joan

  47. 5 out of 5

    DM

  48. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  49. 5 out of 5

    Robert East

  50. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  51. 4 out of 5

    Jean Kolinofsky

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